Posts Tagged ‘NAB 2012 Trends’

Commercial Drivers and Obstacles for the Deployment of Cloud-Based Technology in the Broadcast Industry

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, technology trends | Posted by Joe Zaller
Sep 24 2012

This is the eighth in a series of articles about some of the findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2012 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

 

Cloud computing is one of the hot topics in the broadcast industry in 2012, but our research shows that it’s still early days for deployments of this technology in the broadcast industry.  This article looks at the commercial drivers for implementing cloud technology, what potential buyers view as obstacles to deploying cloud technology, and to whom cloud technology is most important commercially in 2012.

 

About this time last year, we met with a large number of industry executives to discuss what broadcast industry trends to add, if any, to Devoncroft’s annual global study of the broadcast industry, the Big Broadcast Survey (BBS).

During our meetings with more than 50 industry executives, one trend was mentioned virtually every time – “cloud computing / cloud-based services.”  However, when we asked what specific information about cloud technology these people wanted to know, there was a wide divergence of opinion.  Some were interested in how broadcasters plan to use cloud technology, and what parts of the workflow broadcasters might migrate to the cloud first.  Others wanted to know if broadcasters would simply transfer existing workflows to the cloud, or whether cloud technology will enable entirely new workflows.  And finally there were some who confessed that they didn’t actually know what they wanted to know; they just wanted to understand more about cloud technology and its implications for the broadcast industry.  Ultimately, we added questions about cloud technology to the 2012 BBS in an attempt to answer some of these questions.

As seen in Figure 1 the nearly 10,000 respondents to the 2012 BBS who we asked to prioritize the commercial importance to their businesses of a variety of broadcast industry trends, ranked “cloud computing / cloud-based services” #7 out of 16 in our 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trends Index.

Although cloud technology ranks in the top half of our 2012 Trends Index, it is significantly below other topics such as multi-platform content delivery and other traditional drivers of spending such as the transition to HDTV, and the move to file-based workflows.

Figure 1: The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trends Index

 

Commercial Drivers and Obstacles for Cloud Technology in Broadcast

To better understand the commercial drivers behind the answers of these respondents, we asked, we asked those respondents who said that “cloud computing / cloud-based services” was the most important trend to their commercial success in the future why they feel this is the case.  The results are shown in the table below.

 

Figure 2: Commercial Drivers for Deployment of Cloud Technology in Broadcast Industry

 

The top commercial drivers cited by broadcast customers for deploying cloud technology in the broadcast industry highlight the fact “cloud technology / cloud services” are principally viewed today as way to enable new workflows and increase efficiencies.  While potential cost savings — achieved through increased efficiencies, shifting costs to OpEx, and SaaS services —  are arguably the most straightforward rationale for deploying cloud technology, these results imply that customers also see the cloud as a potential driver of revenue, particularly if it enables new workflows, drives collaboration, and increases the overall utilization of content.

While the benefits of deploying cloud technology are relatively clear, it is also useful to understand the obstacles that customers feel may prevent them from deploying this technology today.  These are shown below in Figure 3, which since we are discussing cloud, is displayed in the form of a word cloud. Keep in mind that the people describing these obstacles to deploying cloud technology / service, are in fact a representative sample of the biggest proponents of cloud technology in the broadcast industry.

Figure 3: Obstacles to Deploying Cloud Technology in Broadcast Industry

 

Even those who regard cloud technology as the most important commercial driver for their business over the next several years note a wide range of obstacles preventing them from deploying it today.  The most commonly cited factors are budget/cost, availability of bandwidth, content security, and the perception that cloud technology is too immature for broadcast applications.  Other factors cited as obstacles include lack of skilled personnel, rights issues, internal bureaucracy, and disruption to existing workflows.

Despite these obstacles, customers are seriously investigating this technology, and technology vendors are investing in the development of a wide variety of cloud technologies and services.

 

Relative Importance of Cloud Technology

Given the hype surrounding cloud technology, and the level of investment from vendors, it is perhaps not surprising to find that technology suppliers — represented in the chart below by systems integrators and vendors — see cloud technology as more important to their commercial success than do their customers.

 

Figure 4: Technology buyers versus sellers: Relative importance of cloud technology

 

 

Indeed, it turns out that those respondents who are most interested in, and have the most to gain commercially in 2012 from “cloud technology / cloud services” are the parties whose business is developing and selling cloud technology.

 

Figure 5: Commercial Importance of Cloud Technology by Respondent Type

 

This does not mean that the concept of cloud in broadcast is not important.  Our research confirms that there is considerable interest in deploying cloud technology and cloud services in the broadcast industry.

However, it appears that significant issues, including immature technology, cost, security, bandwidth, and viable business models, must be overcome before cloud technology can deliver commercial success that lives up to the hype it has generated over the past year.

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A previous version of this article appeared in the 2012 IBC Daily News.

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The information in this article is based on select  findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2012 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2012 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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Related Content:

The 2012 Big Broadcast Survey – Information and available reports

The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

Analyzing Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 2 – The 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 3 — 2012 BBS Global Brand Opinion Leaders League Table. 

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 4 — the 2012 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2012. All Rights Reserved.  No part of this article, including but not limited to charts, images, data presentation, and numerical findings may be reproduced without written permission from Devoncroft Partners.

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Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 4 — the 2012 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, market research, technology trends, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Sep 17 2012

This is the seventh in a series of articles about some of the findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2012 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

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This is the fourth post in an occasional series of articles about how broadcast technology vendors were ranked and benchmarked on a variety of metrics by the respondents to the 2012 BBS.

The previous three articles in this series described the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, the 2012 BBS Net Change in Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and the 2012 BBS Global Brand Opinion Leaders League Table.  These rankings show how the global sample of 2012 BBS respondents rated a variety of broadcast technology vendor brands in terms of their overall opinion of these vendors, and also how their opinions have changed over time.

This post looks at one of the most important metrics for any technology company – innovation.

The product side of the film & broadcast industry is driven by technology and innovation.  All vendors spend heavily on research and development in order to create advanced technologies that make their products stand out from the competition.  Thus innovation is a very important component of the brand image and reputation of vendors in this space.

To find out which broadcast technology vendors are considered to be most highly regarded in terms of innovation, respondents were asked to rank broadcast technology vendor brands for “Innovation” on a scale of 1-10 – with 10 being best in the market, and 1 being worst in the market.  The top 30 ranked brands for innovation are shown below for the global sample of all respondents.


Please note that these results are shown in alphabetical order, NOT in the order in which they were ranked in the study. 

 

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There are a wide variety of companies on this list, including large and small firms; single product and multi-product firms; global and regional players; and audio and video technology providers.

Let’s look specifically at the how these companies and their products were ranked in the 2012 BBS, beginning with products and technology.

As shown in the chart below, these companies make products in 22 of the 30 product categories that we covered in the 2012 BBS.

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2012 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table — Frequency of Product Categories:

 

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The top product categories provided by brands in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table are audio vendors – audio consoles and microphones each appear four times in this ranking. This is a change from last year, when the top product categories were microphones, video transport, and signal processing / interfacing / modular.

Does company size play a role in innovation?  Larger companies offer more products and are consequently used in more places than their smaller counterparts.  But this does not necessarily translate into innovation.

The chart below breaks down the 2012 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table by the number of product categories (as defined by the 2012 BBS segmentation) offered by each brand listed in this ranking.

 

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2012 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table – # of Product Categories Offered by Vendor

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Although the top two product categories in 2012 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table, just over one-third of the vendors in this ranking are pure-play audio vendors.

There are also many more hardware companies in the ranking versus software companies.

Interestingly, this ranking is dominated by companies that provide products in a single product category – 18 out of 30 brands in this list. This suggests that focused companies who apply their efforts to specialist product areas are often able to generate more innovation in the eyes of the market.

At the same time, larger companies are also represented on this list of the broadcast industry’s top innovators. Snell provides products in the most categories in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table, followed by Omneon and Sony – please note that 2012 is likely the last time that we will cover Omneon as a stand-alone brand as it has now been fully absorbed into Harmonic.

Of course, companies are listed here based on how many 2012 BBS product categories they produce, which is not an absolute measure of the products offered be each vendor on this list. There are some very large companies on the list above who appear in just one 2012 BBS category.

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Please keep the following in mind when reviewing this information: All data these charts are presented in alphabetical order, not in the order brands were ranked by respondents to the 2012 BBS. All data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2012 BBS, regardless of organization type, organization size, job title, geographic location, or purchasing authority — responses based on individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different from the results shown in this article.  There is a minimum sample size requirement for any brand to be included in any cut of the data presented in this article. There were a total of 152 brands covered in the 2012 BBS, for a complete list please click here. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2012 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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Devoncroft Partners has published a variety of reports from 2012 BBS data.  For more information, please get in touch.

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Related Content:

The 2012 Big Broadcast Survey – Information and available reports

The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

Analyzing Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 2 – The 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 3 — 2012 BBS Global Brand Opinion Leaders League Table. 

Last Year:  The 2011 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved. Findings May Not Be Reproduced or Quoted Without Written Permission from Devoncroft Partners.

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Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 3 – the 2012 BBS Global Brand Opinion Leaders League Table

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 28 2012

This is the sixth in a series of articles about some of the findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2012 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

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This is the third post in a series of articles about how broadcast technology vendors were ranked and benchmarked on a variety of metrics by the respondents to the 2012 BBS.

The first two posts in this series described the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and the 2012 BBS Net Change in Overall Brand Opinion League Table.  These rankings show how the global sample of 2012 BBS respondents rated a variety of broadcast technology vendor brands in terms of their overall opinion of these vendors, and also how their opinions have changed over time.

There were 48 vendors in the in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and 58 vendors in the 2012 BBS Net Change in Overall Brand Opinion League Table.

However, the brands in the Overall Opinion and Net Change of Opinion rankings were not always the same. In fact, between these two sets of league tables, a total of 76 broadcast technology vendor brands were listed.

This post looks at looks at the companies that were listed in both the Overall Opinion and Net Change in Overall Opinion Rankings. In other words, these are the companies whose brands are held in high regard today, and who are perceived to be getting better over time.

We’ve called this list the 2012 BBS Brand Opinion Leaders League Table. Out of the 76 broadcast technology vendor brands that were listed in the previous two rankings, just 30 brands (out of 152) were listed in both sets of rankings, either globally or regionally. These are shown below.

Please note that these results are shown in alphabetical order, NOT in the order in which they were ranked in the study. 

 


The 2012 BBS Brand Opinion Leaders League Table:

 

Not only do 2012 BBS respondents hold these companies in high regard, their opinion of them has improved over the past several years.

There are a wide variety of companies on this list, including large and small firms; single product and multi-product firms; global and regional players; and audio and video technology providers.

What they have in common is strong brand recognition, and a dynamism that 2012 BBS respondents feel is making them even stronger.

 

Brand Opinion Leaders by Product Categories

As shown in the chart below, the companies in the 2012 BBS Brand Opinion Leaders League Table make products in 25 of the 30 categories that we covered in the 2012 BBS.

The top products for brand leaders are Audio Processing and Monitoring, Graphics & Branding, Microphones, Signal Processing / Interfacing / Modular, Video Editing, and Video Transport.

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2012 BBS Brand Opinion Leaders League Table — Frequency of Product Categories:

 

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The chart above has a good mix of audio and video products, as well as a mix of hardware and software products.

It is also useful to look at the number of product categories provided by each vendor in the Global Brand Opinon Leader League Table.  After all, larger companies often make more products and are consequently used in more places than their smaller counterparts.

The table below shows the number of product categories that each brand in this ranking produces (as defined by the segmentation used in the 2012 BBS).

 

 

2012 BBS Brand Opinion Leaders League Table — Number of 2012 BBS Product Categories per Brand:

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While there are several brands on this list that appear in many product categories, the vast majority produce only one or two types of products.  Indeed out of the thirty brands in this table, about hale 2/3 appear only once (down from 2/3 in 2011).

Keep in mind that companies who produce only one type of product are not necessarily small.  There are some very large companies on the list above who appear in just one 201 BBS category.

It turns out that to fully understand what drives brand opinion and brand leadership, one needs to look at the factors that drive and influence these perceptions.  This includes the company’s reputation for things like innovation, reliability, quality, value and great customer service.

These metrics will be covered in future posts.

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Please keep the following in mind when reviewing this information: All data these charts are presented in alphabetical order, not in the order brands were ranked by respondents to the 2012 BBS. All data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2012 BBS, regardless of organization type, organization size, job title, geographic location, or purchasing authority — responses based on individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different from the results shown in this article.  There is a minimum sample size requirement for any brand to be included in any cut of the data presented in this article. There were a total of 152 brands covered in the 2012 BBS, for a complete list please click here. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2012 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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Devoncroft Partners has published a variety of reports from 2012 BBS data.  For more information, please get in touch.

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Related Content:

The 2012 Big Broadcast Survey – Information and available reports

The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

Analyzing Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 2 – The 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Last Year:  The 2011 BBS Global Brand Opinion Leaders League Table

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 2 – The 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, market research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 24 2012

This is the fifth in a series of articles about some of the findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2012 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

 

In previous posts, I have discussed the most important broadcast industry trends of 2012, where money is being spent in the broadcast industry in 2012, and the overall opinion rankings of broadcast technology vendors in 2012.

Each year, as part of the Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), we ask a global sample of broadcast professionals to rank a variety of technology vendor brands on a wide range of metrics. We use these responses to create a series of reports, which through benchmarking and industry “league tables,” provides a view as to how each vendor is positioned in the market relative to the industry as a whole, as well as against their direct competitors.

This is the second in a series of posts about how broadcast technology vendors were ranked and benchmarked on a variety of metrics by the respondents to the 2012 BBS.

The first post in this series described the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, which shows how 2012 BBS respondents ranked broadcast vendor brands.

While it’s positive for any vendor to achieve a good “overall opinion” ranking, this metric is somewhat one-sided because it relies solely on the positive opinions of respondents. In order to get a better understanding of how broadcast technology vendor brands are perceived, it is necessary to look at both the positive and negative opinions of brands, and to take into account how these opinions have changed over time.

This post looks at how the global sample of broadcast professionals who participated in the 2012 BBS ranked their net change of overall opinion of the 152 broadcast technology vendors we covered in the study. You can find a chart with the complete list of vendor brands covered in the 2012 BBS here.

 

How These Results Were Calculated

We first asked 2012 BBS respondents to rank their overall opinion of relevant brands (see brand opinion rankings here) on a scale of 1 -10 with 10 being the best in the market and 1 being the worst in the market.  We then asked respondents whether their opinion of these brands has changed over the last few years – specifically whether they feel their opinion of each brand has “improved,” “declined” or “stayed the same.”

This “change of opinion data” provides a more comprehensive view of how each brand is perceived by the market because it takes into account positive and negative perceptions.

No company is perfect, and the brands we measured in the 2012 BBS are no different.  All brands in the 2012 BBS study had both positive (got better) and negative (got worse) connotations associated with it, and there were also are significant percentage of respondents who said their opinion of a brand had “stayed the same.”

In order to derive a more meaningful metric, we use the “change of opinion” data to calculate the  Net Change in Overall Opinion for each brand by subtracting the percentage of respondents who said a brand “got worse” from the percentage of respondents who said their opinion of a brand had “got better,” while ignoring the “stayed the same” responses.

This metric shows the brands that are perceived as getting better, and which are in decline, on an overall basis.

The Net Change in Overall Opinion presents a more balanced view each brand because it takes into account both the positive and negative perceptions of brands, along with how these opinions have changed over time.

 

The Net Change in Overall Opinion findings from the 2012 BBS are shown below in two ways:

  • An overall industry “league table” that shows the 30 highest ranked vendors for the metric “Net Change of Overall Opinion.”  The data in this chart is broken out globally and regionally.

 

  •  An analysis of the “frequency” of appearance of each vendor in the Net Change of Overall Opinion league table

 

The top 30 ranked brands for Net Change of Overall Opinion are shown below for both the global sample of all respondents as well as for all respondents in each of the geographic regions.

Please note that inclusion of any brand in any cut of the data shown the tables in this article is dependent on available sample size.  The minimum sample size for inclusion in these charts is 30 respondents per cut of the data. Therefore it is possible that a highly regarded brand was excluded from these findings based on sample size.

 

In all cases, these results are shown in alphabetical order, NOT in the order in which they were ranked by respondents to the study.


The 2012 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table:

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A total of 58 broadcast technology vendor brands are included in this table (up from 51 in 2011), illustrating the geographic variation of opinion. Analysis of these results shows that are some clear market leaders on a global basis, while others are strong on a regional basis.

It’s useful to understand how often each brand appears in the 2012 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table.

This is shown below, along with the equivalent data from the 2011 BBS for comparison.

 

Frequency of appearance of brands in the 2012 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 9 brands appear four times (compared to 13 brands in 2011), meaning they were ranked in the top 30 globally and in each geographic region

 

  • 12 brands appear three times (compared to 10 brands in 2011)

 

  • 11 brands appear two times (compared to 9 brands in 2011)

 

  • 26 brands appeared one time (compared to 19 brands in 2011).  This illustrates a fragmentation of opinion  about many brands based on geography

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Brands appearing four times in the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

 

  • 2012 BBS: Adobe, Avid, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Harmonic, Panasonic, Riedel, Sennheiser, Sony

 

  • 2011 BBS: Adobe, Aja Video, Apple, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Cisco, Genelec, Omneon, Panasonic, Riedel, Sennheiser, Sony, Tektronix

 

 

Brands appearing three times in the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 2012 BBS: Aja Video, Apple, Autodesk, Digital Rapids, EVS, Front Porch Digital, NewTek, Omneon, Phabrix, Rhozet, Ross Video, Vizrt

 

  • 2011 BBS: Ateme,  Evertz, EVS, Harmonic, Net Insight, Rhozet, Rohde & Schwarz, Ross Video, Shure, Vizrt

 

 

Brands appearing two times in the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

 

  • 2012 BBS: AmberFin, ateme, brightcove, Cisco, Gigawave, Net Insight, Rohde & Schwarz, Screen Service, Tektronix, Telecast, Wohler

 

  • 2011 BBS: AKG, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Ensemble,  Front Porch Digital, Lawo, Telestream, TVIPS, Wohler

 

 

Brands appearing once in the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 2012 BBS: Aspera, Axon, Calrec, Clear-Com, Dolby, Elemental Technologies, Ensemble, Envivio, Evertz, Genelec, Harris, Isilon Systems / EMC, Kaltura, Kit Digital, Lawo, Neumann, PubliTronic / Grass Valley, RTW, Schoeps, Shure, Snell, Telestream, Wheatstone, Wide Orbit, Wowza, Yamaha

 

  • 2011 BBS: AmberFin, Audio-Technica, Avid, Fujinon, Grass Valley, Harris, Inlet Technologies, Linear, Linear Acoustic, Miranda, MSA Focus, Nevion, Playbox, PubliTronic, Schoeps, Screen Service, Solid State Logic, Telecast, Yamaha

 

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Frequency Analysis of the Brands in the in the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:  

In order to provide a better understanding of which brands were most highly ranked in each geographic region, the data has been provided in the table below, which shows the global and regional performance for each brand in the top 30 ranking of overall opinion.

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Frequency Analysis of Brands in the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table: 

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This frequency analysis chart shows that there are some interesting geographic variations in the data. Here’s a closer look at how brands appeared by geography:

 

Appearing only in the global ranking of the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

Seven brands achieved a top 30 ranking in the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion league table, despite not being listed in the top 30 of any of the three geographic regions.  This may be a function of sample size.  As discussed above, there is a minimum sample size requirement for inclusion in each cut of the data presented in these chart, and the global ranking, by definition, has the largest overall sample.

  • brightcove, Elemental Technologies, Kaltura, KIT Digital, Lawo, Wide Orbit, Wowza

 

Appearing only in one region of the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

The following 21 brands appear in one regional category of the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table, but do not appear in the global ranking:

  • Aspera, Axon, Calrec, Clear-Com, Dolby, Ensemble, Envivio, Evertz, Genelec, Harris, Isilon Systems / EMC, Neumann, PubliTronic / Grass Valley, RTW, Schoeps, Shure, Snell, Telestream, Wheatstone, Yamaha

 

Appearing only in the EMEA region in the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Calrec, Isilon Systems / EMC, Neumann, PubliTronic / Grass Valley, RTW, Schoeps, Snell,

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Appearing only in the Asia-Pacific region in the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Axon, Clear-Com, Dolby, Envivio, Evertz, Genelec, Harris, Shure, Yamaha

 

Appearing only in the Americas region in the 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Aspera, Ensemble, Evertz, Telestream, Wheatstone,

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Please keep the following in mind when reviewing this information: All data these charts are presented in alphabetical order, not in the order brands were ranked by respondents to the 2012 BBS. All data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2012 BBS, regardless of organization type, organization size, job title, geographic location, or purchasing authority — responses based on individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different from the results shown in this article.  There is a minimum sample size requirement for any brand to be included in any cut of the data presented in this article. There were a total of 152 brands covered in the 2012 BBS, for a complete list please click here. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2012 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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Devoncroft Partners has published a variety of reports from 2012 BBS data.  For more information, please get in touch.

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Related Content:

The 2012 Big Broadcast Survey – Information and available reports

The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

Analyzing Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Last Year’s Net Change of Overall Opinion Rankings: Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 2 – the 2011 BBS Net Change in Overall Brand Opinion League Table

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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2012 BROADCAST INDUSTRY & DIGITAL MEDIA MARKET RESEARCH FINDINGS

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, market research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 21 2012

Since we are often asked for broadcast industry market research information, we have compiled a list of the articles that have been published based on the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS).  This list will be updated when new articles are published, so please check back regularly.

If you are not familiar with the BBS, it is an annual global of the broadcast technology and digital media market.  Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries participated in the 2012 BBS, making it BBS the largest and most comprehensive study ever done in the broadcast industry.

The BBS is the definitive demand-side study of the broadcast industry and is used by a wide variety of vendors, investment banks, broadcasters, and strategy consultants.

BBS Reports deliver insight into the opinions and attitudes of key technology buyers including broadcasters, playout centers, cable/satellite/IPTV operators, radio stations, recording studios and more. This includes industry trends; purchase intent and buying behavior; major project plans; products being evaluated for purchase; and detailed opinions of vendor brands.

To find out more about the 2012 BBS, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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Selected Market Research Findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey

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The 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – Information and available reports

 

Commercial Drivers and Obstacles for the Deployment of Cloud-Based Technology in the Broadcast Industry

 

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 4 — the 2012 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table

 

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 3 – the 2012 BBS Global Brand Opinion Leaders League Table

 

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 2 – the 2012 BBS Net Change in Overall Brand Opinion League Table

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Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

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Analyzing Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

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Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

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Largest-Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Top Industry Trends of 2012

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 14 2012

This is the fourth in a series of articles about some of the findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2012 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

 

In previous posts, I have discussed the most important broadcast industry trends of 2012 and where money is being spent in the broadcast industry in 2012.

This is the first in a series of posts about how broadcast technology vendors were ranked and benchmarked on a variety of metrics by the respondents to the 2012 BBS.

Each year, as part of the Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), we ask a global sample of broadcast professionals to rank a variety of technology vendor brands on a wide range of metrics including “overall opinion,” “change of opinion,” and brand drivers including “innovation,” “quality,” “reliability,” “value for money,” and “great customer service.”

We use this information to create a series of reports, which through benchmarking and industry “league tables” provides a view as to how each vendor is positioned in the market relative to the industry as a whole, as well as against their direct competitors.

This post looks at how the global sample of broadcast professionals who participated in the 2012 BBS ranked their overall opinion of the 152 broadcast technology vendors we covered in the study. You can find a chart with the complete list of vendor brands covered in the 2012 BBS here

Please note that inclusion of any brand in the tables in this article is dependent on available sample size.  The minimum sample size for inclusion in these charts is 30 respondents per cut of the data. Therefore it is possible that a highly regarded brand was excluded from these findings based on sample size.

 

How These Results Were Calculated

Respondents were asked to rank their opinion of broadcast technology vendor brands on a scale of 1-10 — with 10 being best in the market, and 1 being worst in the market.

The top 30 ranked brands for overall opinion are shown below for both the global sample of all respondents as well as for all respondents in each of the geographic regions.

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Results are shown in two ways:

  • An overall industry “league table” that shows the 30 highest ranked vendors for the metric “overall opinion.”  The data in this chart is broken out globally and regionally.

 

  • An analysis of the “frequency” of appearance in the “overall opinion league table”

 

The top 30 ranked brands for overall opinion are shown below for both the global sample of all respondents as well as for all respondents in each of the geographic regions.

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Please note that in all cases, these results are shown in alphabetical order, NOT in the order in which they were ranked by respondents to the survey.      

 

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2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

 

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A total of 48 broadcast technology vendor brands are included in this table, (up from 43 last year), illustrating the geographic variation of opinion, which will be discussed later.

In terms of frequency of appearance in this table:

 

  • 15 brands appear four times, meaning they were ranked in the top 30 globally and in each of the three geographic regions.  For comparison, in the 2011 BBS (when we covered 118 brands) there were 19 brands that appeared in the top 30 globally and in each of the 3 regions.

 

  • 10 brands appear three times. For comparison, in the 2011 BBS (when we covered 118 brands) there were 9 brands that appeared three times.

 

  • 7 brands appear two times. For comparison, in the 2011 BBS (when we covered 118 brands) there were 2 brands that appeared twice.

 

  • 16 brands appear one time, which demonstrates that some brands are strongest in one geographic area. For comparison, in the 2011 BBS (when we covered 118 brands) there were 13 brands that appeared one time.

 

Analysis of the data shows that are some clear market leaders on a global basis, while others are strong on a regional basis.

A breakdown of how many times each company appears in the ranking shows how many times each brand appears in the chart above.

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Brands appearing four times in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table: 

  • Adobe, AKG, Apple, Avid, Canon, Cisco, Dolby, Genelec, Neumann, Panasonic, Schoeps, Sennheiser, Shure, Sony, Tektronix 

 

Brands appearing three times in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table: 

  • Angenieux, Autodesk, beyerdynamic, Clear-Com, Fujinon, Ikegami, JBL, Rohde & Schwarz, Wohler, Yamaha 

 

Brands appearing two times in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table:

  • Aja Video, Electro Voice, Grass Valley, RTW, Snell, Solid State Logic, Studer 

 

Brands appearing once in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table:

  • Adam, Blackmagic Design, DK Technologies, Evertz, EVS, Harmonic, Harris, HP, Lawo, NEC, Omneon, Riedel, RTS Intercom Systems, Salzbrenner Stagetec, Telex, Thomson 

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Frequency Analysis of the Brands in the in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table:  

The table below, which shows the global and regional performance for each brand in the top 30 ranking of overall opinion, provides a better understanding of where each brand was highly ranked for overall opinion.

 

Frequency Analysis of Brands in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

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The frequency chart shows some interesting geographic variation in the data.

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Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking globally + one region

Two brands managed to achieve a top 30 ranking globally, despite being in the top 30 of only one of the three geographic regions.

  • Aja Video, Grass Valley, Solid State Logic, RTW, Studer

  

Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking in one region

The following 13 brands did not make the top 30 in the global league table of overall opinion, but they did appear in the top 30 overall opinion ranking in one of the geographic regions:

  

Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking only in EMEA

  • Adam, DK Technologies, EVS, Harmonic, Lawo, Riedel, Salzbrenner Stagetec

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Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking only in Asia-Pacific

  • Electro-Voice, Harris, HP, NEC, Omneon, Thomson

 

 Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking  only in the Americas

  • Blackmagic Design, Evertz, RTS Intercom Systems, Telex 

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Please keep in mind when reviewing this information that all data these charts are presented in alphabetical order, not in the order brands were ranked by respondents to the 2012 BBS.  Also, the charts in this posting measure the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2012 BBS respondents, regardless of their company type, company size, geographic location, job title and budget for broadcast technology products.

In order to get full value from this data, it is necessary to evaluate these results on a granular basis.  If you would like more information, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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All data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2012 BBS, regardless of organization type, organization size, job title or geographic location. Responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of the full 2012 BBS Global Market Report. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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Devoncroft Partners has published a variety of reports from 2012 BBS data.  For more information, please get in touch.

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Related Content:

The 2012 Big Broadcast Survey – Information and available reports

The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

Analyzing Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Last Year’s Overall Opinion Rankings: Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – the 2011 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Analyzing Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, technology trends | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 08 2012

This is the third in a series of articles about some of the findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2012 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

 

In a previous post, I discussed The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which shows which industry trends are most commercially important to the global sample of 2012 BBS respondents. 

Like any list of trends, this list includes a mix of current and future commercial priorities, some of which are being done today on a wide scale, some of which are in a trial phase, and others which have not yet been widely implemented.

By a wide margin, the top trend in the 2012 Trend Index is “multi-platform content delivery.”  Other important trends include the transition to file-based workflows, the transition to HDTV operations, and IP networking and content delivery.

Tracking broadcast industry trends and their evolution is useful because this shows what customers are discussing and thinking about implementing in the future.  However, a high ranking in an industry trend Index does not necessarily mean that this is where customers are spending their technology budgets in 2012 and 2013. 

Thus, it’s important to make a clear distinction between what broadcast customers are thinking and talking about in the future (industry trends), and where they are spending their technology budgets today.

Technology spending in the broadcast industry tends to be project-based. Projects might include international elections and sporting championships, to the long-term, planned capital upgrades of broadcast infrastructure and facilities.  Thus, an understanding of the major projects being implemented by broadcaster professionals around the world provides useful insight into the capital expenditure plans of the industry.

Projects represent where broadcast technology budgets are being spent today, not just what people are talking about doing in the future. 

In order to better understand this dynamic, were presented broadcast professionals with a list of major projects and asked them to indicate which ones they are currently implementing or are planning / budgeting to implement within the next year.  Their responses were then used to create the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index, which is shown below. 

 

 

When compared to The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which can be found here, The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index illustrates where broadcast technology budgets are being spent today.

Our research shows that the difference between what people are thinking and talking about (trends), and where they are planning to spend their budgets (projects) can be quite dramatic.

For example although “multi-platform content delivery” dominated the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, the corresponding project “distribute and monetize content on multiple distribution platforms,” ranked #9 out of 17 in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index.

In terms of where money is being spent in the broadcast industry today, more broadcast technology buyers cited “upgrading infrastructure for HD/ 3Gbps operations” than any other project.  This project correlates directly with “transition to HDTV operations,” which was ranked #3 in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index.

Although the transition to HDTV operations is certainly not new, it remains one of the key drivers of broadcast technology spending in 2012 and 2013.  Even as a small number of broadcasters announce that they are close to completing their decade-long transition to HDTV, many broadcasters are still in the early stages of the move to HD.  This is especially true in emerging economies where there is still a great deal of both standard definition and analog infrastructure. 

On a global basis, the transition to HDTV has consistently been the top driver of broadcast technology spending for the past several years — it was also the top project last year in the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index – and it appears that this will be the case for the foreseeable future.

Significantly, the move to HDTV is represented in multiple places in the Project Index.  The projects ranked #3, #5, #7, and #10 – upgrading transmission & distribution capabilities; building new studios / OB vans; launching new channels; and upgrading newsroom operations – are also related to the transition to HDTV operations, as these transmission upgrades, new studios, new channels, and upgraded news environments will almost certainly be at least HD capable, if not fully HD.

Coming in as the #2 ranked project on this Index is “Install or enhance workflow / asset management system.”  It also achieved the #2 rank in 2011, but was much further behind the transition to HDTV in terms of overall importance to broadcast customers.

Although asset management is a relatively small and specialized market, it has become increasingly important over the past several years as broadcast customers move to file-based workflows and plan for multi-platform content delivery.  The take-away here appears to be that once a broadcaster has made the transition to file-based workflows, the strategic emphasis shifts to finding, deploying, and monetizing content in the most efficient way possible.  Thus asset and workflow management are likely to become increasingly important as customers move to business models focused on multi-platform content delivery, and driven by sophisticated IT-based systems.

The rest of the list offers a mixed picture of project activity across the world, and includes everything from upgrading audio and newsrooms to multi-platform distribution being chosen in large numbers. 

As mentioned earlier, multi-platform content delivery ranked #9 in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index.  It also was ranked #9 in 2011. Despite the importance to organizations of monetizing content on multiple distribution platforms, it appears many broadcast professionals have not solidified their business plans in this area.  This likely means that there will be significant opportunities in the future for broadcast technology vendors who offer a suite of products for multi-platform content delivery.  The current excitement surrounding OTT video and connected TV is evidence of this, but this is still a small proportion of the money being spent on broadcasting technology in 2012.

Interestingly, despite the fact that they may have the potential to deliver increased efficiencies and new revenue streams, there are several major projects that appear towards the bottom of this list. The two most obvious instances are the low ranking of “consolidate operations in regional hubs (centralcasting), and “outsourced operations (playout),” which are the bottom two projects on this list. This is because although these are high value projects, they will be undertaken by a relatively small number of organizations — i.e. large broadcasters.  This highlights that the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index is a graphic representation of the number of all planned projects across all respondents, regardless of organization type, size, or location.  It does not measure size, value, or relative commercial importance of planned projects.  Please keep this in mind when reading this information and interpreting these findings.

 

All data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2012 BBS, regardless of organization type, organization size, job title or geographic location. Responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of the full 2012 BBS Global Market Report. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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Related Content:

The 2012 Big Broadcast Survey – Information and available reports

The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry in 2011?  The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index.   

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 © Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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NAB 2012: Broadcast Engineering Interview

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 27 2012

During the 2012 NAB show, I sat down with Broadcast Engineering editor Mike Grotticelli to discuss broadcast industry technology trends, where money is being spent in the broadcast industry, and other findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS).

Click here to watch the video.

 

 

 

Reminder — Media Technology: Strategy & Valuation Conference at NAB 2012

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast technology vendor financials, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, Broadcast Vendor M&A, Broadcaster Financial Results, Devoncroft Digest, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 13 2012

If you are attending the 2012 NAB show you might want to consider setting aside some time to attend a new half-day conference called “Media Technology: Strategy and Valuation.

We are excited to be co-producing this event along with the NAB Show and Silverwood Partners.

This session is being held in room N237 of the Las Vegas Convention Center on Sunday April 15th from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., and it’s free for all registered attendees of the 2012 NAB show.

This conference will address industry-specific factors driving the valuations of companies including changing market dynamics, new technology, and evolving customer requirements. It is intended for industry technology executives, private equity investors, and venture capital investors in the media technology sector.

You’ll hear from experts from the financial community, broadcast industry technology buyers, leading service providers, and media technology market research analysts.

Download full agenda and speaker bios here

 

MEDIA TECHNOLOGY: STRATEGY & VALUATION

Presented by:

  

 

April 15, 2012

Las Vegas Convention Center, Room N237

 

1:30-2:00pm       Registration

 

2:00-2:25pm       Strategic Implications of Transitioning to Cloud and SaaS Platforms for the Media Industry

Presented by David Peto, CEO, Aframe

What is the reality of becoming a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) business?

  • Opportunities and challenges with the business model from the SaaS provider perspective
  • Lessons learned from providing SaaS services to large media companies
  • Key customer variables for deciding to use SaaS services

 

2:25-2:55pm       The Broadcast & Media Technology Industry in 2012

Presented by Joe Zaller, President, Devoncroft Partners

  • Summary of key data derived from the newly published 2012 Big Broadcast Survey, the largest and most comprehensive study of the broadcast industry. Overview of the latest research from the IABM will also be provided.
  • Does brand perception impact valuation? Using data from the annual Big Broadcast Survey, color commentary and market research data will be provided to show how brand perception impacts both customer loyalty and Company valuation, and what vendors can do to change their brand perception for the positive.

      

2:55-3:25pm       Strategic Industry Analysis: Valuations, M & A, and Equity Financing

Presented by Jonathan Hodson-Walker, Managing Partner and Joshua Stinehour, Senior Vice President, Silverwood Partners

Analysis of strategic industry trends and the specific factors that affect company valuations:

  • Review of transaction activity and valuations
  • Technology shifting from a supporting role to a strategic role
  • Business opportunities and models evolving rapidly
  • What businesses are buyers targeting and why?
  • Analysis of Software, SaaS vs. hardware valuation and reasons for differentials

 

3:25-3:50pm       Online Video: Threat, Opportunity, or Both?

Presented by Andrew Taylor, VP Business Development, Grab Media

  • Expert insight on the business models of new media and multiplatform distribution.
  • Commentary on developments in online video, advertising technology, and new distribution and syndication models.

 

 

3:50-4:00             Break

 

 4:00-4:20pm       Technology Transition: Software, File-based, Cloud

Presented by Bernt Kåre Johannessen, Chief Development Officer, Vizrt

  • The business implications of file-based workflows, cloud computing, and multi-platform content delivery for both broadcasters and technology vendors. 
  • Efficiencies for the customer, business model implications, business and technology implementation challenges, revenue models, and required technologies.

 

 4:20-4:40pm       Executing the Strategic Plan: Suggestions and Recommendations for Executives

Presented by Graham Sharp, Director of Media Asset Capital

  • Understanding value and differentiation of business offering to customers
  • Unlocking strategic value of business
  • Tactical implementation of the strategic plan to fully realize value

 

 4:40-5:00pm       The Broadcast Buyer Perspective

Presented by Pat Sullivan, President and CEO, Game Creek Video

  • Game Creek is one of largest Outside Broadcast Truck providers in the US with a client list that reads like the who’s who of Broadcast: ABC, CBS, ESPN, FOX, HBO, NBC, MLB, NBA, and the NFL to name a few!
  • With an annual multi-million US$ budget being spent with Broadcast Equipment vendors, what do GCV want from their suppliers and what could they do better?

 

5:00-6:00pm       Cocktail and Networking Reception

 

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, content delivery, market research, technology trends | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 09 2012

This is the second in a series of articles about some of the findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2012 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

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In a recent post about broadcast industry trends, we published the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which shows the most important trends in the broadcast industry for 2012. 

This article looks at how trends have changed over time, and more specifically what trends became more important or less important in 2012 versus 2011.

Our view is that industry trends drive capital projects, which in turn drives technology budgets, which in turn drives product purchase.  In other words, what technology buyers say is commercially important to their business in the future (i.e. trends) will likely turn into what they are budgeting for tomorrow (i.e. projects).

Therefore it’s useful to review how the relative importance of broadcast industry trends has changed over time, because it provides a preview of where technology purchases will be made in the future. 

 

  • In 2009, the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index was dominated by the Transition to HDTV Operations, while multi-platform content delivery was fourth on the list

 

  • In 2010, multi-platform content delivery had become the most important industry trend, narrowly eclipsing file-based / tapeless workflows (which were combined in the 2010 index) and the transition to HDTV operations

 

  • In 2011 multi-platform content delivery became the dominant trend, where it remains in 2012

 


The chart below shows a comparison of the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index from 2011 and 2012. 

 

 

This chart shows that multi-platform content delivery continues to increase in overall importance relative to other trends in the broadcast industry.  Other net gainers in 2012 versus 2011 include file-based / tapeless workflows, the move to automated workflows, video-on-demand and improvements video compression efficiencies; all of which show year-over year increases in the Index ranking.

Both transition to HDTV operations and IP networking & content delivery declined in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, but stayed in the top four (where they have been since the inception of the Index in 2009).  Other notable decliners in 2012 versus 2011 were “transition to 3Gbps operations”, and “3D,” which saw the largest year-over-year decline on a percentage basis.

It should also be noted that the relatively strong showing of “cloud computing / cloud-based services” which was added to the Index in 2012, undoubtedly had a cannibalizing impact on these results.


To provide additional context on how the importance of technology trends in the broadcast industry changes over time, we have included a comparison of the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index from 2010 – 2012.

 

 

When reading this chart, please bear in mind that in each of the previous two years, one additional trend was added to the Index.  In 2011, analog switch-off was added.  In 2012 cloud computing / cloud-based services was added. 

New trends are added when appropriate (and based on stakeholder feedback), in order to keep the Index current and relevant to the needs of users.  However as discussed in a previous section, this can make it more difficult to perform year-over-year data analysis.  Thus we are providing as much information as possible in this report in order to enable readers to undertake an informed analysis.

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Changes in Numerical Ranking in the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

As shown below, there were some interesting changes in the numerical ranking of the trends covered in the 2012 Index.  The first column in the table below shows how trends were ranked in 2012. The number in parentheses to the right of each trend shows how it ranked in the 2011 BBS Index. Although there were no changes at the top and bottom of the 2012 Index versus the 2011 Index, there was movement in between.

 

 

Several trends were ranked more highly in 2012 than in 2011.  For example the transition to file-based / tapeless workflows moved up one spot to the #2 ranking (eclipsing the transition to HDTV operations for the first time in the Index), and the move to automated workflows also moved up.  

The combination of the strength of multi-platform content delivery, the strong showing of cloud computing, and the increasing importance of file-based workflows and automated operations has significant implications.  Broadcast technology buyers are clearly focused on creating efficiencies wherever possible, while at the same time working to generate new revenue streams through multi-screen offerings.

A number of trends dropped in the Index versus previous years, the most notable being 3D which had the largest year-over-year percentage drop.

Other trends remained relatively static in terms of their ranking in 2011.  For example: “transition to 3Gbps operations,” “transition to 5.1 channel audio,” “outsourced operations,” and “green initiatives” remained the bottom four trends in 2011, as they were in 2012.  However the addition of cloud computing, which ranked #7 in the Index dropped each of these trends down one position.

 

Changes in Commercial Importance of Broadcast Industry Trends

As well as changes to numerical ranking, there were also year-over-year changes to the perception of commercial importance to each trend.  This is shown in the table below:

 

 

For the most part, the trends that moved up in the rankings in 2012 were also seen as more important commercially versus the previous year. 

The common theme among the items on the left side of the above chart is that they all have to do with creating new revenue streams, or cutting costs through greater efficiencies.  Analog switch-off is perhaps the odd one out here, but given that these projects are mandated by governments, they become increasingly important where relevant until the time that these projects have ended.

The items on the right of the above chart are a mixed bag.  As a generalization it’s safe to say that that many of these trends involve spending rather than saving money.  Given that much of the industry is still recovering from recession, extra spending is not a popular choice in the current business environment.

 

Why Tracking Movement of Trends is Important

It is important to note that there is a difference between recognizing that a trend is commercially important and having a business plan in place that capitalizes on that trend.  As stated previously, our view is that industry trends drive capital projects, which in turn drive technology budgets, which in turn drive product purchase.  In other words, what technology buyers say is commercially important to their business in the future (i.e. trends) will likely turn into what they are budgeting for tomorrow (i.e. projects).

For example, the 2012 BBS Trend Index shows that monetizing content on multiple platforms is clearly a key objective for broadcast professionals in the year ahead, yet many players, particularly on the content side, are still experimenting with their business models. At some point these trends will drive capital projects.  When that happens they will become major drivers of technology spending in the broadcast industry. 

We will review what major capital projects are being planned this year in the broadcast industry in a subsequent article.

 

Keep in mind when reading this information that all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2012 BBS, regardless of organization type, organization size, job title or geographic location. Responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of the full 2012 BBS Global Market Report. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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Related Content:

The 2012 Big Broadcast Survey – Information and available reports

The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2010 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2009 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

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 © Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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