Posts Tagged ‘Miranda’

2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) Reports Now Available

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, market research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 15 2014

After months of data collection, analysis, and visualization, we have now completed work on the 2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS). Reports from this study have now been published and are available from Devoncroft Partners.

If you’re not familiar with the BBS, it’s the most comprehensive annual study of technology end-users in the global broadcast industry. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries participated in the 2014 BBS, making it once again the largest market study of the broadcast industry.

BBS reports have been designed to help readers improve their strategic decision-making, customer engagement, marketing strategy, product planning, and sales execution.  BBS reports are also used frequently for M&A-related activities by both buyers and sellers.

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Three types of 2014 BBS reports are available:

  • 2014 BBS Global Brand Reports:  provides deep insight into how each more than 100 broadcast technology suppliers (see full list below) are perceived by market participants, along with comprehensive benchmarking of broadcast technology vendors on a wide variety of metrics.

 

  • 2014 BBS Product Reports:  provide detailed information from buyers, specifiers, and users of broadcast technology products in 31 separate categories (see full list below)

 

  • 2014 BBS Global Market Report: provides detailed information about industry trends, major projects being planned, products being evaluated for purchase, current and future plant infrastructure, broadcast technology CapEx budgets, and planned deployment of new technologies including 4K, Connected TV, and Social TV.

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If you would like information about these reports and how they can help your business, please get in touch.

 

In addition to these paid-for reports, we will also be publishing highlights from the 2014 BBS on the Devoncroft website.  These articles will be posted on a semi-regular basis, so please check back often.

To receive posts when they are published, just enter your email in the box in the upper right-hand corner of the page.

 

The tables below show the product categories and broadcast technology vendor brands covered in the 2014 BBS.

 

 Product Categories Covered in the 2014 BBS:

2014 BBS -- Product Categories Covered in the 2014 Big Broadcast Survey

 

 

Broadcast Technology Brands Covered in the 2014 BBS:

 

2014 BBS -- All Brands included in 2014 BBS

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.© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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Belden Makes it Official – Combination of Grass Valley and Miranda to be Called Grass Valley

broadcast industry trends, Broadcast Vendor M&A | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 02 2014

One day after Belden completed its $220m acquisition of Grass Valley, the company has officially revealed that the combined company will be called Grass Valley.

The company branding combines Grass Valley’s “GV” script and Miranda’s trademark, purple ellipse.

If you want to hear what’s next for the new Grass Valley, be sure to attend the annual IABM Annual NAB State of the Industry Breakfast at the 2014 NAB Show, where Grass Valley Marco Lopez will be featured on a panel of technology vendor CEOs that also includes Brian Cram from Dejero Labs, Charlie Vogt from Imagine Communications (formerly Harris Broadcast), and Carl Dempsey from Wohler Technologies.

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Combined GV-Miranda Logo

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Related Content:

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Completes Acquisition of Grass Valley, Will Invest $25 Million in Integration of Combined Business

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Buys Grass Valley for $220 Million

2014 NAB Show Session Details – IABM Annual NAB State of the Industry Breakfast

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Completes Acquisition of Grass Valley, Will Invest $25 Million in Integration of Combined Business

Broadcast technology vendor financials, Broadcast Vendor M&A | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 01 2014

Belden announced that it has completed the acquisition of the previously announced offer to purchase Grass Valley. When the deal was announced in February 2014, Benden CFO Henk Derksen told equity analysts that the $220m deal would be funded with existing cash.

Grass Valley had approximately $290 million in revenue according to Belden’ press release, so the deal values Grass Valley at 0.75 revenue.

It is believed that the enlarged company will be branded Grass Valley.

According to Belden, the value of the combination of the two companies is clear for both customers and shareholders is clear. The company says that by aligning both resources and strategies, the business will have a broader offering, while realizing the benefits of scale.

Belden also says the combined company “will be able to deliver the ability to simplify the purchasing and management of highly complex infrastructures.”

Belden says acquisition of Grass Valley will be immediately accretive to adjusted earnings per share with an estimated impact of approximately $0.20 in 2014 and $0.50 in 2015.

Much of the increased profitability of the new company is likely to come through synergy savings.

One of the hallmarks and core competencies of the Belden team is the efficient integration of acquired companies into the Belden family, and the associated inculcation with the “Belden Business System, including LEAN enterprise techniques and the Market Delivery System.”

There are many examples of Belden buying underperforming companies and subsequently using its internal processes to achieve strong financial performance and operating return.

Indeed, the company says “there is a significant opportunity in the application of the Belden Business System” in the case of Grass Valley

Derksen told analysts at the time of the announcement that Belden plans “to invest approximately $25 million during the first 12 months of integration largely through restructuring efforts to capture the value of the combined company. The strategic actions will include cost actualization, manufacturing footprint and leveraging a combined sales and marketing function and the implementation of lean principles.”

At same time Belden CEO John Stroup said “the result of the integration is unlikely to include meaningful reductions in R&D investment. However, I think there’s going to be an opportunity for Miranda to throttle back on some investments where Grass Valley’s stronger and for Grass Valley to throttle back on opportunities where Miranda’s stronger. Manufacturing is a clear opportunity. Today, Grass Valley outsources a lot of their manufacturing. We think there’s an opportunity for us to leverage our existing fixed cost structure, absorb that manufacturing. So that’s a clear opportunity to create value in the combined business and there’s clearly an opportunity to leverage our global sales force. Both of us at 200 and 300 million respectively, have created a global sales force calling on the same customers and we see a clear opportunity to improve our efficiency there. So the assumptions that we have in place include manufacturing cost synergies as well as the opportunity to leverage the combined sales organization, both in terms of cost and revenue.”

 

The following slides show the strategic rationale for the Miranda – Grass Valley merger, as explained by Belden in February 2014.

 

Belden Buys Grass - 1

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Belden Buys Grass - 2.

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Belden Buys Grass - 3

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Belden Buys Grass - 4

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Belden Buys Grass - 5

 

 

Given that it is believed that the combined company will be branded as Grass Valley, the deal marks a new beginning rather than the end of the road for the formidable broadcast brand.

Prior to officially becoming part of Belden, what is now Grass Valley has been through a number of strategic changes in the last 10-15 years.

This started in December 2000 when Thomson purchased Philips Professional, which at that time had revenue of approximately 250m Euros, and employed 1,050 people. Philips products, which included cameras, film imaging, signal processing, media networking & control, and systems integration services, became part of Thomson Multimedia.

After the Philips acquisition, the combined company, which was renamed Thomson Multimedia, had combined revenue of approximately 366m Euros.

In 2001, Thomson bought Grass Valley in 2001 for $172m.  At that time, Grass Valley had revenues of about $200m.

Technicolor then went on a buying spree, acquiring multiple companies that were ultimately folded into the Grass Valley brand.

Thomson added to its Grass Valley holdings with the 2005 acquisition Canopus for more than $100m.

By the late 2000s Thomson – which had by this time changed its name to Technicolor – put Grass Valley on the block, initially with what has been described as a very high price tag.

After several rumored bids, and more than a year on the block Technicolor sold what is now Grass Valley to Francisco Partners, a San Francisco – based private equity firm.

Technicolor retained other parts of the business, including transmitters and head-end equipment, and later sold-off these assets in two separate transactions.

Technicolor sold the Grass Valley transmission business to PARTER Capital Group.

The Grass Valley head-end business was sold to FCDE in March 2011.

Grass Valley is one of the industry’s great companies and I am sure that the people there are happy to finally have resolved their fate.  Let’s hope they can now focus on making great products – and of course money for their new owners.

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Related Content:

Press Release: Belden Announces Successful Completion of Grass Valley Acquisition

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Buys Grass Valley for $220 Million

Press Release: Technicolor to sell its Broadcast Services activity to Ericsson

Belden Q3 2012 Revenue Declines 6 Percent, Miranda “Off to a Slow Start”

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Miranda Buys Softel

Belden Closes Deal to Acquire Miranda

More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Buys Miranda for $350 Million in All-Cash Deal

More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Technicolor Closes Deal to Dispose of Grass Valley Transmission Business

Technicolor Receives Binding Offer for Video Head-End Business

Technicolor decides not to sell digital signage provider PRN

Technicolor completes sale of Grass Valley to Francisco Partners

 

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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Broadcast Vendor M&A: Barco Buys X2O Media for C$21 Million as Part of Plan to Diversify Beyond Display and Projection

Broadcast technology vendor financials, Broadcast Vendor M&A | Posted by Joe Zaller
Mar 19 2014

Digital signage provider X2O Media has been acquired by Barco for C$21m. The deal values Montreal-based X2O at a healthy 4X its 2013 revenue.

Barco says “X2O Media will be integrated in the Barco organization as a business venture, allowing it to continue the development of its platform technology, while leveraging its business growth from Barco’s worldwide sales and service presence.”

X2O Media was founded by serial entrepreneur David Wilkins who sold his previous company, VertigoXmedia, to Miranda Technologies for C$11 million in 2006.  The deal with Miranda excluded the digital signage business of VertigoX, which Wilkins re-launched as X2O Media.  Since that time, the company grew from 10 to 40 employees, and saw its revenue increase to C$5m by the end of 2013.

X2O was backed by Propulsion Ventures, which was also a backer of VertigoXMedia.

According to Barco CEO Eric Van Zele, part of the strategic rationale for X2O is to diversify Barco’s offering beyond display and projection technology.  Barco also says the X2O portfolio will allow it to better meet customer expectations regarding workflow and content management, while differentiating itself further from competition.

The deal also creates new market opportunities for X2O. According to Wilkins, X2O’s current market “is limited to North America, but benefiting from Barco’s global network we will be able to grow our activities worldwide.”

This is not Barco’s first foray into the digital signage arena, but the 4X revenue Barco is paying for X2O, is significantly more than its last deal.  In 2010, Barco acquired Belgium–based digital signage specialist dZine for what it said at that time was “less than 1 time annual sales of dZine excluding an earn-out provision over the next two and a half years.”  According to public records, dZine had revenue of €7.96m in 2010 ($10.5m based on 2010 for-x rate to Euro).  dZine posted revenue of €8.53m and €6.9m in 2011 and 2012, respectively, so it’s unclear whether the earn-out provision was ever triggered.

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Related Content:

Press Release: Barco acquires Montreal-based X2O Media, expanding its technology platform with advanced connectivity capabilities

Press Release (2012): X2O Media Raises Additional Equity Financing From Propulsion Ventures

Press Release (2010): Barco acquires digital signage specialist dZine

Press Release (2006): Miranda Technologies to Acquire VertigoXmedia

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2013. All Rights Reserved.

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Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Buys Grass Valley for $220 Million

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Feb 06 2014

Belden has submitted a binding offer to purchase privately held Grass Valley, a leader within the broadcast market, for $220 million.

The binding offer is subject to consultation with Grass Valley’s foreign labor works council, after which we will enter into a definitive agreement. Grass Valley provides innovative technologies including production switchers, cameras, servers, and editing solutions within the mission critical applications of broadcast customers. When combined with Miranda, the resulting end-to-end solution will be the most complete and compelling in the industry.

Grass Valley had approximately $290 million in revenue according to Belden’ press release, so the deal values Grass Valley at 0.75 revenue.

Even so, it’s probably not a bad deal for Grass Valley’s owner, PE firm Francisco Partners, which  purchased Grass Valley from Technicolor in 2011 (closed in January 2011), for no money down, and an $80 million promissory not payable five years from the date of the deal.

Part of Francisco Partner’s deal to buy Grass Valley included an undisclosed additional pay-out if Francisco Partners sold Grass Valley for a partner in the future.  Since these numbers are unknown, it’s difficult to know if the payments were triggered.

“The great thing about this overlap is the limited overlap,” said Belden CEO John Stroup.

“We are extremely excited to have Grass Valley join the Belden family. By combining Grass Valley and Miranda, we will create the broadcast industry’s largest and most complete portfolio,” said Mr. Stroup.

 

Here’s info on the deal and the rationale for it:

 

Belden Buys Grass - 1

Belden Buys Grass - 2

Belden Buys Grass - 3

 

Belden Buys Grass - 4

 

 

Belden Buys Grass - 5


Belden Buys Grass - 6


Related Content:

Press Release: Belden Reports Solid Results in Fourth Quarter 2013 and Announces Binding Offer to Acquire Privately Held Grass Valley for $220 Million

Press Release: Technicolor to sell its Broadcast Services activity to Ericsson

Belden Q3 2012 Revenue Declines 6 Percent, Miranda “Off to a Slow Start”

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Miranda Buys Softel

Belden Closes Deal to Acquire Miranda

More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Buys Miranda for $350 Million in All-Cash Deal

More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Technicolor Closes Deal to Dispose of Grass Valley Transmission Business

Technicolor Receives Binding Offer for Video Head-End Business

Technicolor decides not to sell digital signage provider PRN

Technicolor completes sale of Grass Valley to Francisco Partners

 

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Telestream Buys Captioning Provider CPC

broadcast industry technology trends, Broadcast Vendor M&A | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 20 2013

Transcoding and workflow vendor Telestream announced that it has acquired Computer Prompting and Captioning (CPC).

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

CPC, which has about 10 employees according to an article in the Sacramento Business Journal, provides captioning technologies for a variety of professional applications. The company was founded in 1986 by Dilip. Som and Sid Hoffman and has a long history of innovation.

Telestream says the CPC deal will bring it “deep expertise in captioning, which will benefit the company’s current and long term product strategies.”  Telestream also says that its transcoding, workflow automation, live streaming and web publishing products will all benefit from the addition of CPC’s technology.

“CPC is a recognized leader in captioning for television and the Web, whose customers include media and entertainment companies, educational institutions, and houses of worship,” said Telestream founder and CEO Dan Castles. “Our customers at all levels need tools to author and distribute captioning in a more integrated way. This is a natural extension of what we do, and we look forward to integrating CPC’s world-class technology into all of our products.”

 

Second Subtitling M&A Deal in 2013

This is the second acquisition this year of a captioning/subtitling technology provider.  In January 2013, Miranda announced that it had acquired UK-based Softel for an undisclosed amount.

So why the sudden interest in captioning and subtitling by established industry players?

Captions and subtitles have long been required by law, and the “Twenty-First Century Communications & Video Accessibility Act” in the United States took this requirement further by mandating that certain internet video content must also be subtitles.

According to the FCC’s Implementation Schedule for Captioning Internet Video Programming:

  • Live and near-live video programming must be captioned on the Internet if it is shown on TV with captions (as of March 31, 2013)

 

  • Pre-recorded video programming that is substantially edited for the Internet must be captioned if it is shown on TV with captions on or after September 30, 2013.

 

These regulations puts tremendous pressure on broadcasters, media companies, and content owners – and therefore provides opportunities for technology vendors like Telestream and Miranda who have snapped up providers of these solutions.

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Related Content:

Press Release: Telestream Acquires Captioning Leader CPC

Sacramento Business Journal: Telestream acquires Computer Prompting and Captioning Co.

CPC History: The Interesting Story of How CPC Got Started

CPC Milestones

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Miranda Buys Softel

Federal Communications Commission — Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act

Federal Communications Commission — Captioning of Internet Video Programming

More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Private Equity Firm Acquires Telestream

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2013. All Rights Reserved.

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Belden Eyes Improvement in Broadcast Business in Second Half of 2013 After “Tepid” First Six Months

Broadcast technology vendor financials, Quarterly Results | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 12 2013

Belden said its broadcast revenue for the second quarter of 2013 was $169.7m,   up 7.1% versus last quarter.  The company said the sequential growth in broadcast was “driven largely by typical seasonal patterns.”

Broadcast operating profit margins were 14.2%, up from 4.7% last year (prior to the acquisitions of Miranda and PPC), and up 90 basis points sequentially, which the company said was in line with its overall results.

Belden management said that “broadcast markets in 2012 benefited from the Olympic Games and U.S. election cycle, with an unfavorable impact to the second quarter of approximately $2 million to $4 million on a year-over-year basis.”

On the company’s conference call with equity analysts, Belden CEO John Stroup described the broadcast market as cyclical, saying “2012 had a lot of demand as a result of the Olympic Games as well as the U.S. presidential election. And as a result, I think the first half (of 2013) was a little tepid (for broadcast), and I think we’ll see improvement in the second half (of 2013).

Although Belden did not break our revenue figures for Miranda, which it acquired last year, it did say that the Miranda business performed in-line with its expectations.

 

Outlook

“The global macroeconomic environment in 2013 is generally as we anticipated, and we remain confident in our ability to deliver consistent operating results in the second half of the year,” said Stroup.  “Therefore, we are increasing the midpoint of both our revenue and earnings outlook for the full year.”

Belden says expects third quarter 2013 adjusted revenues to be in the range of $525m – $535m and adjusted income from continuing operations per diluted share to be in the range of $0.90 – $0.95. For the full year ending December 31, 2013, the Company now expects adjusted revenues to be the range of $2.09 billion – $2.12 billion and adjusted income from continuing operations per diluted share to be in the range of $3.54 – $3.69.

Previously, the company said it expected full year adjusted revenues to be in the range of $2.07 billion – $2.12 billion and adjusted income from continuing operations per diluted share to be in the range of $3.49 – $3.69.

On a GAAP basis, Belden expects third quarter 2013 revenues to be in the range of $522m – $532m and income from continuing operations per diluted share to be in the range of $0.55 – $0.60. For the full year ending December 31, 2013, the company expects revenues to be in the range of $2.08 billion – $2.11 billion and income from continuing operations per diluted share to be in the range of $2.11 – $2.26.

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Related Content:

Press Release: Belden Reports Solid Results in Second Quarter 2013

Belden Q2 2013 Earnings Call Transcript

Belden Creates Broadcast Business Unit, Discloses Broadcast Revenue and Profitability

Belden Presentation (April 25, 2013) — Explanation of New Business Unit Reporting Structure

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2013. All Rights Reserved.

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Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 2 – The 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, market research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 05 2013

This is the sixth in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 

Previous articles about the 2013 BBS discussed the most important broadcast industry trends, how the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends have changed over time, where money is currently being spent in the broadcast industry, broadcast technology products being evaluated for purchase in 2013 and 2014, and the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table.

 

This is the second in a series of posts about how broadcast technology vendors were ranked and benchmarked on a variety of metrics by the respondents to the 2013 BBS.

The first post in this series described the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, which shows how 2013 BBS respondents ranked broadcast vendor brands.

This post looks at how the global sample of broadcast professionals who participated in the 2013 BBS ranked their Net Change of Overall Opinion of the 151 broadcast technology vendors we covered in the study.

 

Net Change of Overall Opinion

While it’s good news for any vendor to achieve a good “overall opinion” ranking, this metric is somewhat one-sided because it relies solely on the positive opinions of respondents.

In order to get a better understanding of how broadcast technology vendor brands are perceived, it is necessary to look at both the positive and negative opinions of brands. It is also necessary to take into account how these opinions have changed over time.

Once this information has been collected, we use it to create the Net Change of Overall Opinion Ranking, a metric that demonstrates which brands are perceived as getting better, and which are in decline, on an overall basis. Net Change in Overall Opinion provides a more balanced view each brand because it takes into account both the positive and negative perceptions of brands, along with how these opinions have changed over time.

An explanation of how these results were calculated can be found at the end of this article.

The complete list of vendor brands covered in the 2013 BBS is here.

 

The Net Change in Overall Opinion findings from the 2013 BBS are shown below in two ways:

  • An overall industry “league table” that shows the 30 highest ranked vendors for the metric “Net Change of Overall Opinion.”  The data in this chart is broken out globally and regionally.

 

  • An analysis of the “frequency” of appearance of each vendor in the Net Change of Overall Opinion league table

 

The top 30 ranked brands for Net Change of Overall Opinion are shown below for both the global sample of all respondents as well as for all respondents in each of the geographic regions.

When reading these results, please keep the following in mind.

 

Both audio and video brands are included in these rankings, and all response data shown herein is from the global sample of from all 2013 BBS participants, regardless of organization type, size, geographic location, or size of budget; and that actual results in the BBS Brand report may be different.

Please note that inclusion of any brand in any cut of the data shown the tables in this article is dependent on available sample size.  The minimum sample size for inclusion in these charts is 30 respondents per cut of the data. Therefore it is possible that a highly regarded brand was excluded from these findings based on sample size.

In all cases, these results are shown in alphabetical order, NOT in the order in which they were ranked by respondents to the study.


The 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table:

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion

 

 

A total of 53 broadcast technology vendor brands are included in this table (versus 59 in 2012 and 51 in 2011), illustrating the geographic variation of opinion. Analysis of these results shows that are some clear market leaders on a global basis, while others are strong on a regional basis.

It’s useful to understand how often each brand appears in the 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table.

This is shown below, along with the equivalent data from both 2012 and 2011 for comparison.

 

Frequency of appearance of brands in the 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 10 brands appear four times (compared to 9 brands in 2012 and 13 brands in 2011), meaning they were ranked in the top 30 globally and in each geographic region

 

  • 13 brands appear three times (compared to 13 brands in 2012 and 10 brands in 2011)

 

  • 11 brands appear two times (compared to 11 brands in 2012 and 9 brands in 2011)

 

  • 19 brands appear one time (compared to 26 brands in 2102 and 19 brands in 2011).  This illustrates a fragmentation of opinion  about many brands based on geography

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Brands appearing four times in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

 

  • 2013 BBS: Adobe, Aja Video, Autodesk, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Evertz, Panasonic, Riedel, Rohde & Schwarz, Sennheiser

 

  • 2012 BBS: Adobe, Avid, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Harmonic, Panasonic, Riedel, Sennheiser, Sony

 

  • 2011 BBS: Adobe, Aja Video, Apple, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Cisco, Genelec, Omneon, Panasonic, Riedel, Sennheiser, Sony, Tektronix

 

 

Brands appearing three times in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 2013 BBS: AmberFin, Angenieux, ateme, Cisco, Elemental Technologies, EVS, Harmonic, NewTek, Ross Video, Sony, Telestream, Vizrt, Wide Orbit

 

  • 2012 BBS: Aja Video, Apple, Autodesk, Digital Rapids, EVS, Front Porch Digital, NewTek, Omneon, Phabrix, Rhozet, Ross Video, Vizrt

 

  • 2011 BBS: Ateme,  Evertz, EVS, Harmonic, Net Insight, Rhozet, Rohde & Schwarz, Ross Video, Shure, Vizrt

 

 

Brands appearing two times in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

 

  • 2013 BBS: Adam, Ensemble, Front Porch Digital, Lawo, Net Insight, Neumann, Nevion, Phabrix, Screen Service, Snell, Solid State Logic

 

  • 2012 BBS: AmberFin, ateme, brightcove, Cisco, Gigawave, Net Insight, Rohde & Schwarz, Screen Service, Tektronix, Telecast, Wohler

 

  • 2011 BBS: AKG, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Ensemble,  Front Porch Digital, Lawo, Telestream, TVIPS, Wohler

 

 

Brands appearing once in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 2013 BBS: arvato / S4M, Avid, Axon, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Fujinon, Linear Acoustic, On-Air (Oasys), Ooyala, RTW, Shure, Soundcraft, Studer, Tektronix, Telecast, TVIPS, Wheatstone, Xen Data, Yamaha

 

  • 2012 BBS: Aspera, Axon, Calrec, Clear-Com, Dolby, Elemental Technologies, Ensemble, Envivio, Evertz, Genelec, Harris, Isilon Systems / EMC, Kaltura, Kit Digital, Lawo, Neumann, PubliTronic / Grass Valley, RTW, Schoeps, Shure, Snell, Telestream, Wheatstone, Wide Orbit, Wowza, Yamaha

 

  • 2011 BBS: AmberFin, Audio-Technica, Avid, Fujinon, Grass Valley, Harris, Inlet Technologies, Linear, Linear Acoustic, Miranda, MSA Focus, Nevion, Playbox, PubliTronic, Schoeps, Screen Service, Solid State Logic, Telecast, Yamaha

 

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Frequency Analysis of the Brands in the in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:  

In order to provide a better understanding of which brands were most highly ranked in each geographic region, the data has been provided in the table below, which shows the global and regional performance for each brand in the top 30 ranking of overall opinion.

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2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion -- Frequency Analysis

 

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This frequency analysis chart shows that there are some interesting geographic variations in the data. Here’s a closer look at how brands appeared by geography:

 

Appearing only in the global ranking of the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

Four brands achieved a top 30 ranking in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion league table, despite not being listed in the top 30 of any of the three geographic regions.  This may be a function of sample size.  As discussed above, there is a minimum sample size requirement for inclusion in each cut of the data presented in these chart, and the global ranking, by definition, has the largest overall sample.

  • Ensemble, On-Air Systems, Ooyala, Xen Data

 

Appearing only in one region of the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

The following  brands appear in one regional category of the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table, but do not appear in the global ranking:

  • Arvato/S4m, Avid, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Fujinon, Linear Acoustic, RTW, Shure, Soundcraft, Studer, Tektronix, Telecast, T-VIPS, Yamaha

 

Appearing only in the EMEA region in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Arvato/S4m, Axon, RTW

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Appearing only in the Asia-Pacific region in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Avid, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Fujinon, Shure, Soundcraft, Studer, Tektronix, Yamaha

 

Appearing only in the Americas region in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Telecast, T-VIPS, Wheatstone

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How These Results Were Calculated

No company is perfect, and the brands we measured in the 2013 BBS are no different.  All brands in the 2013 BBS had both positive (got better) and negative (got worse) connotations associated with them.  There were also are significant percentage of respondents who said their opinion of a brand had “stayed the same.”

2013 BBS participants were asked to rank their opinion of broadcast technology vendor brands on a scale of 1-10 — with 10 being best in the market, and 1 being worst in the market.

We then asked respondents whether their opinion of these brands has changed over the last few years – specifically whether they feel their opinion of each brand has “improved,” “declined” or “stayed the same.”

The Net Change in Overall Opinion for each brand was then calculated by subtracting the percentage of respondents who said a brand “got worse” from the percentage of respondents who said their opinion of a brand had “got better,” while ignoring the “stayed the same” responses.

This “change of opinion data” provides a more comprehensive view of how each brand is perceived by the market because it takes into account positive and negative perceptions.

 

 

Please note that inclusion of any brand in the tables in this article is dependent on available sample size.  The minimum sample size for inclusion in the tables shown herein is 30 respondents per cut of the data. Therefore it is possible that a highly regarded brand may have been excluded from any or all of the tables in this article due to insufficient sample size.

Also, please keep in mind when reviewing this information that all data these charts are presented in alphabetical order, NOT in the order brands were ranked by respondents to the 2013 BBS.

 

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The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Previous Year:  The 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Revenues at Miranda Technologies Down 10 Percent in Q4 2012

Broadcast technology vendor financials, Broadcast Vendor M&A, Quarterly Results, SEC Filings | Posted by Joe Zaller
Mar 04 2013

Miranda Technologies posted Q4 2012 revenue of approximately $44.3m, down about 10% versus the same period a year ago (when the company reported record revenues for both the quarter and the full year), and down about 8% versus the previous quarter.

The results were disclosed in a regulatory filing from parent-company Belden, which stated: “Our revenues and income (loss) from continuing operations before taxes for 2012 included $73.6 million and ($11.5 million), respectively, from Miranda. Included in our income from continuing operations before taxes for 2012 are $10.6 million of cost of sales related to the adjustment of inventory to fair value and $10.9 million of amortization of intangible assets. In addition, we recognized $2.5 million of transaction costs associated with the acquisition in 2012, which are included in our selling, general, and administrative expenses.”

Miranda was acquired by Belden in July 2012 for $374.7m, and its results have been included in Belden’s consolidated financial statements since July 27, 2012.

Because of the timing of Belden’s purchase of Miranda, the company’s revenue for the full year 2012 is unknown.  This is because Miranda did not report its results for the second quarter of 2012 as it was acquired by Belden just prior to the date when it was scheduled to announce these results.

Miranda did however, disclose revenue for Q1, Q3, and Q4 2012 of $41.35 (C$42.2m), ~$48m and ~$44.3m respectively, or approximately $133.65m in aggregate for the three quarters.

Miranda’s revenue for the full year 2011 was $177.3 (C$181.9m), so unless the company had revenue in excess of $43.65m in the second quarter of 2012, its 2012 revenue will have been lower than the previous year.  Miranda’s revenue for the second quarter of 2011 was $42.1m (C$43.2m).

Please keep in mind that the above numbers are approximate due to exchange rate fluctuations between the Canadian Dollar and the US Dollar since the beginning of 2011.

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Related Content:

Belden FY 2012 10-K Filing

Belden Q4 and FY 2012 Earnings Presentation

Previous Quarter: Belden Q3 2012 Revenue Declines 6 Percent, Miranda “Off to a Slow Start”

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Miranda Buys Softel

Belden Closes Deal to Acquire Miranda

More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Buys Miranda for $350 Million in All-Cash Deal

Previous Year: Miranda Reports 27% Revenue Increase in 2011

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Broadcast Vendor M&A: Miranda Buys Softel

Broadcast Vendor M&A | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jan 25 2013

In a move that it says will bolster its playout offering, Miranda Technologies announced that it will acquire Softel, ad UK-based, provider of captioning and subtitling technology. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

This is Miranda’s first acquisition since the company was purchased by Belden in 2012.  At that time Belden executives said that they intended to use Miranda as a “platform” through which they could build a larger business in the broadcast industry through strategic M&A.  Although this initial deal is a “bolt-on” to Miranda’s existing playout business, it offers evidence that Miranda will indeed continue to be a consolidator in the broadcast technology market.

According to Miranda President Marco Lopez, captioning is one of the areas of the playout chain that is often difficult to manage. “By introducing Softel’s technology into the Miranda portfolio and directly integrating it into our iTX solution, we’ll present broadcasters with further efficiencies, not only in the purchase process, but also during deployment and in post-sale support as well. Miranda will continue to support the full Softel solutions suite and honor all Softel partner agreements.”

“We’re certain our customers will benefit from the synergies this acquisition creates,” said Sam Pemberton, Softel’s CEO. “Being aligned with Miranda in the Belden family extends our reach into potential new markets and being part of this team allows us to focus on continuous innovation.”

Integration planning will be led by a team of Miranda and Softel executives, but there will be no business disruption for Miranda or Softel during the transition. The integration is expected to be complete by this summer.

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Related Content:

Belden Q3 2012 Revenue Declines 6 Percent, Miranda “Off to a Slow Start”

Belden Closes Deal to Acquire Miranda

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2013. All Rights Reserved.

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