Posts Tagged ‘IABM’

The IABM and Devoncroft Partners Announce Market Research Joint Venture

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Sep 13 2013

Press Release issued at IBC 2013

The IABM and Devoncroft Partners Announce Market Research Joint Venture

Two Leading Market Intelligence Providers Will Jointly Develop and Deliver Data-Driven Products and Services for Broadcast and Digital Media Clients 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE, U.K. and CORONADO, Calif. — Sept. 13, 2013 — The IABM (International Association of Broadcasting Manufacturers) and Devoncroft Partners today announced the launch of IABM DC, a joint venture of the two organizations that will develop and deliver a series of market intelligence products and services for broadcast and digital media clients.

IABMDC’s first product will be the latest edition of the IABM Global Market Valuation and Strategy Report, which will then be published on an annual basis. First created in 2006, this report is the result of a collaborative industrywide project that provides market sizing data for the broadcast industry as a whole, and for more than 100 individual product categories.

“The IABM Global Market Valuation and Strategy Report has been and remains the definitive valuation report for the broadcast and media technology supply market, with detailed regional splits, product and segment analysis, and trends forecasts,” said IABM Director General Peter White. “By teaming up with Devoncroft, we gain access to a wealth of valuable new data and expertise that not only strengthens the report’s modelling and forecasts, but also gives us the ability to go on and customize reports for those seeking further forecasting and analysis. Through IABMDC, we will build on the solid foundation that we have created to provide a range of digital media market intelligence going forward.”

“By partnering with the IABM, we have created a joint organization with deep industry domain expertise, sophisticated analytical capabilities, and significant market reach,” said Joe Zaller, founder and principal of Devoncroft. “We believe that IABM DC will quickly become a trusted provider of broadcast and digital media technology market sizing data to suppliers and purchasers of media technology worldwide, as well as to others seeking high-quality information about this sector.”

The Global Market Valuation and Strategy Report is unique because it is based on actual sales and shipment data provided by a range of partners, including many of the major players in the broadcast and media technology supply market, who invest in the project.

Further information about Devoncroft Partners is available at www.devoncroft.com. Information about the IABM is available at www.theiabm.org.

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2013. All Rights Reserved.

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Tracking Changes in the Commercial Importance of Broadcast Industry Trends, 2012 – 2013

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jun 26 2013

This is the second in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

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In a previous article, we published the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which shows how a global sample of nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals ranked a set of broadcast industry trends in terms of the commercial importance of each one to their business.

This article compares how the relative commercial importance of these trends has changed over time, and looks specifically at what trends were ranked higher or lower in terms of commercial importance in 2013 versus 2012 by our global panel of research participants.

 

Why Tracking Movement of Trends is Important

Understanding changes in how technology buyers rank the relative commercial importance of industry trends provides important insight into what might be next for the industry.

Whereas it’s tempting to use historical sales data to try to determine what factors will drive industry CapEx in the future, it’s actually quite difficult to use the relative performance of a technology vendor in the past as predictor of the behavior of technology buyers in the future.

Broadcast industry CapEx tends to be project-based. Expenditure is typically contemplated based on business needs, and then deployed according to available resources. And yet, technology buyers must always be cognizant of a wide variety of factors, including technology evolution, business risk/reward, and even government intervention.

Changes to end-user rankings of the commercial importance of trends can be used to predict where technology expenditure may be headed in the future.

This is because industry trends drive capital projects, which in turn drives technology budgets, which in turn drives product purchase.  In other words, what technology buyers say is commercially important to their business in the future (i.e. trends) will likely turn into what they are budgeting for tomorrow (i.e. projects).

Therefore it’s useful to review how the relative importance of broadcast industry trends has changed over time, because it provides a preview of where technology purchases will be made in the future.

 

  • In 2009, the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index was dominated by the “transition to HDTV operations.”  “Multi-platform content delivery” was ranked #4 on this list.

 

  • The following year, in 2010, “multi-platform content delivery” had become the most important industry trend, narrowly eclipsing “file-based/tapeless workflows” (which were combined in the 2010 index) and the “transition to HDTV operations.”

 

  • By 2011, multi-platform content delivery began to dominant trend in the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, ranking significantly higher than all other industry trends.  Analog-switch-off was added to the Index in 2011.

 

  •  Last year (2012) multi-platform content delivery continued to dominate the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, and file-based workflows surpassed transition to HDTV operations for the first time.  Cloud computing/cloud-based services was added to the Index in 2012.

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The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

To create the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, we presented BBS respondents with a list of 16 industry trends and asked them to tell us which one trend they consider to be “most important” to their business, which one trend they consider to be “second most important” to their business, and which other trends (plural) they consider to be “also very important.”

We then apply a statistical weighting to these results, based on how research participants ranked the commercial importance of each trend, and use this information to create the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which is shown below.

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

 

In 2013, “multi-platform content delivery” was ranked by research participants as being the most important industry trend – by an order of magnitude versus other trends included in the 2013 Index.  More information about the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index can be found here.

In the context of this article, it should be noted that trends included in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index have not changed from the previous year.

The composition of the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index is reviewed each year in conjunction with Devoncroft clients, broadcast technology end-users, and a variety of domain experts.  New trends are added to the Index when BBS stakeholders believe that the value of this additional trend information outweighs the resulting distortion of the year-over-year comparisons.

Based on this input, it was decided not to make any changes to the composition of the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index. The benefit of this is that it’s easy to make a 1:1 comparison of how trends were ranked in 2013 versus 2012.  The downside is that some emerging trends such as 4K, bonded cellular, HEVC encoding, social TV etc., were not included in the 2013 Index.   However, these issues (and more) were included in other parts of the 2013 BBS, and there is a significant amount of available data on these subjects within various 2013 BBS reports.

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Comparing the Commercial Importance of Broadcast Industry Trends in 2013 Versus 2012 

The chart below shows a comparison of the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index from 2012 and 2013.  It measures changes in how end-users ranked the commercial importance of industry trends on a year-over-year basis.

 2013 BBS -- Comparison of 2012 and 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index (white background)

 

MPCD, file-based/tapeless workflows, IP networking & content delivery, and the transition to HD operations have occupied the top four positions in the BBS Global Trend Index since its inception in 2009, although it is interesting to note there has been considerable movement in their position in the actual rankings.

While multi-platform content delivery (MPCD), was once again the top-ranked trend in 2013, it did decline slightly on a year-on-year basis versus the rest of the Index. Nevertheless, MPCD was ranked considerably higher in 2013 than any other trend, which was also the case in 2012.

 

Leaving aside the numerical rankings for the moment, other observable changes in the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends between 2012 and 2013 include:

  • Y-Y increases in the relative importance of “IP networking & content delivery,” “improvements in video compression efficiency,” “cloud computing/cloud-based services,” “move to automated workflows,”  “centralized operations,” “transition to 5.1 channel audio,” “outsourced operations,” and “green initiatives.”

 

  • Y-Y decreases in the relative importance “multi-platform content delivery,” “file-based/tapeless workflows,” “transition to HDTV operations,” “video on demand,” “targeted advertising,” “analog switch-off,” and “3D-TV”

 

Some of these changes are subtle, and do not necessarily imply that the relative importance of the trends have changed over time.  However, other movements in the Index do indeed impact the actual numerical position of each trend within the ranking.

 

 

Changes in Numerical Ranking in the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

As shown below, there were some interesting changes in the numerical ranking of the trends in the 2013 Index versus the 2012 Index.

The column on the left of the table below shows the numerical rankings of trends in 2013. The number in parentheses to the right of each trend shows how it ranked in the 2012 BBS Index. Although there were no changes at the top and bottom of the 2013 Index versus the 2012 Index, there was movement in between.

2013 BBS -- Numerical Ranking Changes -  2012 and 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

 

 

Several trends were ranked more highly in 2013 than in 2012.  For example, IP networking & content delivery moved up one spot to the #3 ranking (eclipsing the transition to HDTV operations for the first time in the Index).

Other net gainers in numerical rankings include IP networking & content delivery, cloud computing/cloud-based services, centralized operations, transition to 3Gbps (1080p) operations, and transition to 5.1 channel audio; all of which show year-over year increases in the Index ranking.

Net decliners in 2013 versus 2012 include the transition to HDTV operations, video on demand, analog switch-off, and 3D-TV, which had the largest year-over-year percentage drop.

The table below provides a consolidated view of the relative movement in numerical rankings of broadcast industry trends between 2012 and 2013.

 

2013 BBS -- Chages of Relative Imporance of 2012 versus 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

 

So what does this all mean?

On a global basis, the strong showing of “file-based workflows,” coupled with a y-y decline in the commercial importance of the “transition to HDTV operations” implies that those broadcasters that have largely completed their HD transition are now focusing on introducing efficiencies that will ultimately lead to new sources of revenue.

Indeed, the continued domination of “multi-platform content delivery” and “file-based workflows,” combined with the increasing importance of “IP networking & content delivery” and “cloud computing/cloud-based services” demonstrates that in 2013 broadcast technology buyers will spend money to create operational efficiencies, while at the same time working to generate new revenue streams through multi-screen offerings.  However, it remains to be seen whether many broadcasters will be able to create sustainable profits from multi-platform offerings.

It should be noted that there may be significant regional variations in this data.  For example, the transition to HDTV operations is likely to remain a strong driver for those end-users who have not yet started, or substantially completed their migration to HD.  Likewise, although “analog switch-off” is ranked towards the bottom of the 2013 Index, it’s probably safe to assume this is a top priority in in those territories where governments have mandated a switch to digital broadcasting.

 

 

Turning Talk into Action – When do Trends Become Capital Projects?

There is a difference between recognizing that a trend is commercially important and having a business plan in place that capitalizes on that trend.  As stated previously, our view is that industry trends drive capital projects, which in turn drive technology budgets, which in turn drive product purchase.  In other words, what technology buyers say is commercially important to their business in the future (i.e. trends) will likely turn into what they are budgeting for tomorrow (i.e. projects).

The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index shows that monetizing content on multiple platforms remains the top objective for broadcast professionals in the year ahead.  However, many industry participants — on both the content and technology sides of the business — are still experimenting with their business models.

At some point these trends will drive capital projects, if they are not already doing so today.  When that happens they will become major drivers of technology spending in the broadcast industry.

In a future article, we’ll look at where money is being spent today in the broadcast industry.

 

 

The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location. Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

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Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2010 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2009 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved..

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Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jun 18 2013

This is the first in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 

Measuring the Broadcast Industry’s Most Important Trends

Each year, Devoncroft Partners conducts a large scale global study of the broadcast industry called the Big Broadcast Survey (BBS).  Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries participated in the 2013 BBS, making it the most comprehensive study ever done in the broadcast industry.

One of the key outputs from the BBS is the annual BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index. This is a ranking of the broadcast industry trends that are considered by BBS respondents to be the most commercially important to their businesses in any given year.

In order to ensure that the trends we measure each year in our research are the most relevant to the industry, we spend a considerable amount of time seeking feedback about the structure of our reports from a wide variety of industry professionals including broadcasters, broadcast service providers, technology vendors, consultants, and domain experts.

In 2013 we kept the list of trends in this Index the same as in 2012.  This enables direct year-over-year comparisons of trends across different demographics.  It also means that we decided not to include certain “new” technology trends in the 2013 Index, including 4K, Ad-ID, connected TV, DSLR cameras, HEVC, second screen applications, SOA, and social TV.  However, we have covered each of these “new” technologies separately in the 2013 BBS project, and will be making this information available to clients through our published reports.

 

The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

To create the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, we presented BBS respondents with a list of 16 industry trends and asked them to tell us which one trend they consider to be “most important” to their business, which one trend they consider to be “second most important” to their business, and which other trends (plural) they consider to be “also very important.”

We then apply a statistical weighting to these results, based on how research participants ranked the commercial importance of each trend.

Please note that our goal from this question is to help clients gain insight into the business drivers behind the respondent’s answer. Therefore, respondents were asked to rank these trends in the context of the commercial importance to their business, rather than “industry buzz,” or “cool technology,” or marketing hype.

The table below shows the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index.

Keep in mind this is a measure of what people say is important to the future of their businesses, not what they are doing now, or where they are making money today.  We’ll address some of these topics in later posts.

Please note that this chart shows a weighted index, not a measure the number of people that said which trend was most important to them.  Also, please note that this chart measures the responses of all non-vendors who participated in the 2013 BBS, regardless of company type, company size, geographic location, job title etc.  Thus the responses of any demographic group such as a particular company type or geographic location may vary widely from the results presented in this article.

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2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

 

 

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The fact that multi-platform content delivery (MPCD) is considered by respondents to be the industry trend that is most important commercially to their business jumps off the page, and is perhaps not surprising, given the rise of on demand video platforms, consumer mobility, and sales of smartphones and tablets.  Indeed, across multiple studies, research participants have repeatedly told us that multi-platform content delivery is the trend that is most commercially important to their business over the next several years.

However, our discussions with broadcasters, content owners, and technology vendors indicate that despite the obvious fact that the way content is delivered and consumed has changed forever, this has not yet translated into profitable revenue streams for end-users.  There are a number of reasons why this is the case, and these have significant implications for content owners, broadcasters, and technology vendors.  We’ll be addressing some of these in future posts on this website.

Although multi-platform content delivery is seen by far as the most important trend in 2013, there are quite a few other interesting things to consider in the above chart.

Since the first BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index was published in 2009, “multi-platform content delivery,” “file-based / tapeless workflows,” “IP networking and content delivery” and transition to HDTV operations” have been the top ranked trends.  However their relative position has shifted dramatically.  For example, in 2009, the transition to HD operations was the #1 ranked trend globally, and MPCD was ranked #4.  Today these rankings are reversed.

For a number of years the transition to HDTV operations has been a major driver of end-user technology budgets, and therefore technology product sales. The HD transition continues to be and is likely to remain one of the strongest drivers of broadcast industry revenue, particularly in emerging markets, but has this year dropped to the #4 position on a global basis.

We provide significant coverage of the global transition to HDTV operations in the 2013 BBS Global Market Report (report available for purchase). This includes a granular breakdown of the current and projected future progress that end-users have made in their transition to HD, as well as the upgrade plans for more than a dozen product categories including cameras, switchers, routers, servers, graphics, encoders, communication links, and encoders. We’ll also be publishing more information here about project-based spending and the HD transition in future articles.

At the same time, the relative importance of the transition to file-based workflows has been increasing in the market, and in 2013 is ranked #2 in the Index of Global Trends.

The “transition to file-based operations” is significant for many reasons. Over the past several years, we’ve observed a pattern whereby broadcasters, who have invested considerable time, effort, and money into transitioning their operations to HD, begin to shift their focus towards increasing the efficiency of their operations.

Over time, efficiency has become a key driver of broadcast technology purchasing.  In fact, our research shows that in many cases, increased operational efficiency and saving cost is more important than cutting-edge technology.

This is because the economics of the entire industry have changed – because of MPCD and other factors – and as a result, end-users must change their cost structure (radically in some cases) in order to generate sustained profitability into the future.

This has implications for the broadcast industry in terms of both workflows and product procurement, and as a result, the importance of both file-based workflows and “IP networking & content delivery” has increased as broadcast technology buyers continue to look for efficiencies as they transition to new technical platforms and business models.  The desire for broadcast technology buyers to gain operational efficiencies will likely continue to be a strong macro driver in 2013, as broadcasters continue to deploy new workflows.

Another key driver of broadcast technology spend is new channel launches, which have the potential to increase revenue.  New channels, and the desire for simultaneous bandwidth saving and increased image quality for MPCD services have driven an increasing interest in “improvements in compression efficiency,” which is ranked #5 in the 2013 Index.

New channel launches are being enabled by integrated playout systems (aka “channel-in-a-box”), which bring highly automated operations to channel playout and master control environments. Thus we expect to continue to see a strong interest in the “move to automated workflows” over the next several years.  Automated workflows are also seen as drivers of efficiency.

“Cloud computing / cloud based services,” which was added to the Index last year is the #6 ranked trend (up one spot from last year).  It seems that you can’t read anything about technology these days (broadcast or otherwise) without coming across some mention of “the cloud.”  So why is something so important to so many people ranked in the middle of the pack?  Our research shows that it’s still early days for cloud technology in the broadcast industry. Not only is there still a lack of widespread understanding about exactly how the cloud will impact the business models of broadcast technology buyers, there is also an inherent distrust of cloud technology by many broadcasters.  We posted some preliminary information about the planned uses of cloud technology in the broadcast industry in an earlier article called With All the Hype About Cloud, What Are Media Organizations Actually Going to Deploy?

Nevertheless, cloud technology is seen as increasingly important by broadcasters, as evidenced by several recently announced end-user initiatives and many discussions about creating a “virtualized broadcast infrastructure” in order to drive greater efficiencies.

So while the “hype” surrounding cloud technology in broadcast may be real, it appears that a previously much-hyped technology, 3D, is seen as increasingly less important to end users. Research participants ranked 3D at #14 in the 2013 Index.  It was #10 in 2012, and #8 in 2011.

In addition to creating greater efficiencies, end-users are also looking for ways to increase their revenue in an environment where the economic model of the industry is changing dramatically.  Thus “video-on-demand” (#7), and “targeted advertising” (#9) make strong showings in the 2013 Index.

Although it’s towards the bottom of the rankings, “analog switch-off” is very important for those regions where it’s happening today – primarily as mandated by local governments.

As with previous years, the following trends were ranked towards the low-end of the Index: “transition to 3Gbps operations”, “transition to 5.1 channel audio”, “outsourced operations” and “green initiatives”.

We’ll take a more in-depth look at the year-over-year changes in a subsequent post.

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The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

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Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2010 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2009 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

 

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2013. All Rights Reserved.

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Today: NAB 2013 Media Technology: Strategy and Valuation Conference

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 07 2013

If you are in Las Vegas to attend the 2013 NAB Show, you don’t want to miss the second annual “Media Technology: Strategy and Valuation,” conference which is being co-produced by Devoncroft, Silverwood Partners and the organizers of the NAB Show.

This event is free for all registered attendees of the 2013 NAB show.

It is being  held in room N239/241 of the Las Vegas Convention Center on Sunday April 7th from 1:45 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

This year’s conference features an intensive, information-packed series of presentations and panels that discuss the strategic trends and industry-specific factors influencing the value of media technology companies.

We’ve worked hard to put together an outstanding line-up of speakers and presenters, including top technology buyers, leading technology vendor CEOs, and private equity investors who will speak to the opportunities and challenges involved with financing the next phase of technology change in the industry.

The agenda will offer attendees the informed opinions of technology purchasers, industry executives, market research organizations, and financial professionals. The event will serve as a thought-provoking kick-off to the 2013 NAB Show.

This session is intended for senior executives from technology vendors, end-users, and investment firms in the media technology sector.

We are expecting 200+ attendees based on the latest registration numbers, so it’s a good networking opportunity as well.

 

Here’s the conference agenda:

 

1:45 pm – 1:50 pm

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION

Joe Zaller – President, Devoncroft Partners

 

 

1:50 pm – 2:20 pm

NAB SHOW SPROCKIT PRESENTATIONS

Hear from three market-ready start-ups who have been selected by the NAB’s SPROCKIT initiative.  This session will include an introduction of the SPROCKIT initiative followed by presentations from three of NAB Show’s inaugural SPROCKIT participants.

Presenter(s):

  • Hilary DeCesare, Co-Founder and CEO, Everloop
  • Heidi Messer, Co-Founder & Chairman, Collective[I]
  • John West, Founder & CEO, The Whistle

 

 

2:20 pm – 2:45 pm

THE BROADCAST & MEDIA TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY IN 2013

Joe Zaller will present a summary of key data derived from the newly published 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), the largest and most comprehensive study of the broadcast industry. Key results from the 2013 BBS will include key investments areas as well as trends of significance that are impacting these purchasing decisions.

Joe Zaller – President, Devoncroft Partners

 

 

2:45 pm – 3:10 pm

STRATEGIC INDUSTRY ANALYSIS: VALUATIONS, M&A, AND EQUITY FINANCING

Jonathan Hodson-Walker and Joshua Stinehour of Silverwood Partners will present an analysis of strategic industry trends and the specific factors that affect company valuations, including transaction activity and valuations; vendor strategic considerations; and the current M&A environment along with near-term expectations. Attendees will also learn which businesses are buyers and investors targeting and why.

Presenter(s):

  • Jonathan Hodson-Walker  – Managing Partner, Silverwood Partners
  • Joshua Stinehour – Managing Director, Silverwood Partners

 

 

3:10 pm – 3:35 pm

M&A, VALUATION PERSPECTIVES FROM INDUSTRY EXECUTIVES

Joe Zaller will moderate a panel of three recognized executives at leading vendors will offer views on the critical drivers of value (in context of M&A) in the industry, and discuss the best practices they’ve learned on how to review an acquisition opportunity and how to integrate M&A into overall growth strategies. Obstacles to further industry consolidation will also be discussed.

Moderator:

Joe Zaller – President, Devoncroft Partners

 

Panelists:

  • Dan Castle — CEO, Telestream
  • Harris Morris – CEO, Harris Broadcast
  • Denis Suggs — Executive Vice President, Belden

 

 

3:45 pm – 4:00 pm

IABM END-USER RESEARCH OVERVIEW

Yves Dupuis, Director of Market Intelligence at the IABM (trade association that represents broadcast technology suppliers) will present an overview of the latest end-user research from the IABM, including the changing requirements of broadcast technology buyers, and what this means for the supply community.

Yves Dupuis — Director of Market Intelligence, IABM

 

 

4:00 pm – 4:25 pm

THE BROADCAST TECHNOLOGY BUYER PERSPECTIVE

Joe Zaller will guide a discussion with broadcast executives responsible for technology budgets as they ponder the questions of most significance to decisions on technology purchasing: How are savvy broadcasters aligning known technology expenditures against uncertain multi-platform revenue opportunities in order to counteract the ‘consumer-broadcast disconnect’? How are these companies assessing the business risk of technology purchase decisions today given the uncertainty of future business models?

Moderator:

Joe Zaller – President, Devoncroft Partners

 

Panelists:

  • Fred Mattocks – General Manager Media Operations and Technology, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  • Steve Plunkett – Chief Technical Officer, Red Bee Media
  • Phil Braden — SVP Technology and Applications, PCCW

 

 

4:25 pm – 4:50 pm

KEYNOTE: TECHNOLOGY CHANGE, BUSINESS CHANGE

Clyde Smith, FOX Networks Engineering and Operations  will offer a broadcast executive’s perspective on the major business issues facing the industry, what major initiatives and projects have been created to solve these issues, a candid assessment of the results of these initiatives, and a discussion of what is still needed from a technology standpoint to address these issues.

Clyde Smith — SVP New Technology, FOX Networks Engineering and Operations

 

 

4:50 pm – 5:15 pm

INVESTOR PERSPECTIVES ON INDUSTRY

Joe Zaller will moderate this panel of private equity professionals who have made recent investments in the media and entertainment space will offer their unique perspectives on trends of significance for the M&E sector. They will also preview their plans for intelligence-gathering at this year’s NAB Show, the trends that are driving investment dollars in the sector, and what characteristics influence their evaluation of an investment opportunity within the M&E industry.

Moderator:

Joe Zaller – President, Devoncroft Partners

 

Panelists:

  • Dave Golob, Francisco Partners
  • Kevan Leggett, Lloyds TSB Development Capital Ltd
  • William Smales, The Carlyle Group
  • Bryce Winkle, The Gores Group

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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IABM to Host NAB 2013 Information Session on Industry Reinvention, Featuring Panel of Prominent Technology Vendor CEOs

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 03 2013

Here’s an event at the NAB 2013 Show that’s worth attending.

IABM, the trade group that represents media technology suppliers worldwide, is hosting an information session that will highlight recent industry market intelligence data, and include a moderated panel discussion on reinvention featuring CEOs of four prominent technology vendor: Avid, Digital Rapids, Nevion, and Ross Video.

Disclosure: I work with IABM and I arranged the CEO panel for this event.

When putting this panel together we wanted to have a mix of large and small companies, as well as a mix of hardware and software vendors.  I think this line-up fits that profile perfectly, and should provide some lively debate.

Best of all, it’s a free session that’s open to all registered NAB Show attendees.

 

Here’s some more information on the event.

The increasing power of IT technology, combined with the need to distribute and monetize content on multiple platforms, has driven broadcasters, pay TV operators, service providers, and other end-users of digital media technology to create and deploy new workflows strategies and business models.

This rapid shift in the commercial priorities of end-users has significant implications for the supply side of the industry.

This thought-provoking session will provide unique insight into challenges and opportunities facing vendors as the industry enters a period of transition from long-established business models to an environment where end-user increasingly demand software-based solutions, elastic provisioning, and higher levels of both efficiency and customer service.

“Traditional” broadcast technology vendors may have to re-evaluate their existing product portfolio and re-invent their business model. At the same time a plethora of new entrants are challenging the established industry norms. It’s a dynamic period to say the least.

The critical issues facing the industry in these times of change and opportunity will be discussed. How will larger companies adapt? What role will new entrants play? What will be the key drivers as the broadcast and media industry goes through this period of re-invention?

This is an excellent opportunity to gain a unique insight in to the developments that matter.

 

The event is from 7:30am – 9:00am on Monday April 8, 2013, in Room N234/236 of the Las Vegas Convention Center.

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Related Content:

The IABM – Representing the Broadcast And Media Technology Supply Industry Worldwide

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Going to NAB? Don’t Miss 2nd Annual “Media Technology: Strategy and Valuation Conference,” A Thought Provoking Kick-Off to the 2013 NAB Show

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast technology vendor financials, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, Broadcast Vendor M&A, Broadcaster Financial Results, content delivery, technology trends | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 02 2013

If you are attending the 2013 NAB show, be sure not to miss the second annual “Media Technology: Strategy and Valuation,” conference which is being co-produced by Devoncroft, Silverwood Partners and the organizers of the NAB Show.

This event is being held in room N239/241 of the Las Vegas Convention Center on Sunday April 7th from 1:45 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., and it’s free for all registered attendees of the 2013 NAB show.

This year’s conference features an intensive, information-packed series of presentations and panels that discuss the strategic trends and industry-specific factors influencing the value of media technology companies.

We’ve worked hard to put together an outstanding line-up of speakers and presenters, including top technology buyers, leading technology vendor CEOs, and private equity investors who will speak to the opportunities and challenges involved with financing the next phase of technology change in the industry.

The agenda will offer attendees the informed opinions of technology purchasers, industry executives, market research organizations, and financial professionals. The event will serve as a thought-provoking kick-off to the 2013 NAB Show.

This session is intended for senior executives from technology vendors, end-users, and investment firms in the media technology sector.

 

Here’s the current lineup of presenters:

 

1:45 pm – 1:50 pm

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION

Joe Zaller – President, Devoncroft Partners

 

 

1:50 pm – 2:20 pm

NAB SHOW SPROCKIT PRESENTATIONS

Hear from three market-ready start-ups who have been selected by the NAB’s SPROCKIT initiative.  This session will include an introduction of the SPROCKIT initiative followed by presentations from three of NAB Show’s inaugural SPROCKIT participants.

Presenter(s):

  • Hilary DeCesare, Co-Founder and CEO, Everloop
  • Heidi Messer, Co-Founder & Chairman, Collective[I]
  • John West, Founder & CEO, The Whistle

 

 

2:20 pm – 2:45 pm

THE BROADCAST & MEDIA TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY IN 2013

Joe Zaller will present a summary of key data derived from the newly published 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), the largest and most comprehensive study of the broadcast industry. Key results from the 2013 BBS will include key investments areas as well as trends of significance that are impacting these purchasing decisions.

Joe Zaller – President, Devoncroft Partners

 

 

2:45 pm – 3:10 pm

STRATEGIC INDUSTRY ANALYSIS: VALUATIONS, M&A, AND EQUITY FINANCING

Jonathan Hodson-Walker and Joshua Stinehour of Silverwood Partners will present an analysis of strategic industry trends and the specific factors that affect company valuations, including transaction activity and valuations; vendor strategic considerations; and the current M&A environment along with near-term expectations. Attendees will also learn which businesses are buyers and investors targeting and why.

Presenter(s):

  • Jonathan Hodson-Walker  – Managing Partner, Silverwood Partners
  • Joshua Stinehour – Managing Director, Silverwood Partners

 

 

3:10 pm – 3:35 pm

M&A, VALUATION PERSPECTIVES FROM INDUSTRY EXECUTIVES

Joe Zaller will moderate a panel of three recognized executives at leading vendors will offer views on the critical drivers of value (in context of M&A) in the industry, and discuss the best practices they’ve learned on how to review an acquisition opportunity and how to integrate M&A into overall growth strategies. Obstacles to further industry consolidation will also be discussed.

Moderator:

Joe Zaller – President, Devoncroft Partners

 

Panelists:

  • Dan Castle — CEO, Telestream
  • Harris Morris – CEO, Harris Broadcast
  • Denis Suggs, Executive Vice President, Belden

 

 

3:45 pm – 4:00 pm

IABM END-USER RESEARCH OVERVIEW

Peter White, Director General IABM will present an overview of the latest end-user research from the IABM, including the changing requirements of broadcast technology buyers, and what this means for the supply community.

Peter White — Director General, IABM

 

 

4:00 pm – 4:25 pm

THE BROADCAST TECHNOLOGY BUYER PERSPECTIVE

Joe Zaller will guide a discussion with broadcast executives responsible for technology budgets as they ponder the questions of most significance to decisions on technology purchasing: How are savvy broadcasters aligning known technology expenditures against uncertain multi-platform revenue opportunities in order to counteract the ‘consumer-broadcast disconnect’? How are these companies assessing the business risk of technology purchase decisions today given the uncertainty of future business models?

Moderator:

Joe Zaller – President, Devoncroft Partners

 

Panelists:

  • Fred Mattocks – General Manager Media Operations and Technology, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  • Steve Plunkett – Chief Technical Officer, Red Bee Media
  • Phil Braden — SVP Technology and Applications, PCCW

 

 

4:25 pm – 4:50 pm

KEYNOTE: TECHNOLOGY CHANGE, BUSINESS CHANGE

Clyde Smith, FOX Networks Engineering and Operations  will offer a broadcast executive’s perspective on the major business issues facing the industry, what major initiatives and projects have been created to solve these issues, a candid assessment of the results of these initiatives, and a discussion of what is still needed from a technology standpoint to address these issues.

Clyde Smith — SVP New Technology, FOX Networks Engineering and Operations

 

 

4:50 pm – 5:15 pm

INVESTOR PERSPECTIVES ON INDUSTRY

Joe Zaller will moderate this panel of private equity professionals who have made recent investments in the media and entertainment space will offer their unique perspectives on trends of significance for the M&E sector. They will also preview their plans for intelligence-gathering at this year’s NAB Show, the trends that are driving investment dollars in the sector, and what characteristics influence their evaluation of an investment opportunity within the M&E industry.

Moderator:

Joe Zaller – President, Devoncroft Partners

 

Panelists:

  • Dave Golob, Francisco Partners
  • Kevan Leggett, Lloyds TSB Development Capital Ltd
  • William Smales, The Carlyle Group
  • Bryce Winkle, The Gores Group

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, content delivery, market research, technology trends | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 09 2012

This is the second in a series of articles about some of the findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2012 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

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In a recent post about broadcast industry trends, we published the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which shows the most important trends in the broadcast industry for 2012. 

This article looks at how trends have changed over time, and more specifically what trends became more important or less important in 2012 versus 2011.

Our view is that industry trends drive capital projects, which in turn drives technology budgets, which in turn drives product purchase.  In other words, what technology buyers say is commercially important to their business in the future (i.e. trends) will likely turn into what they are budgeting for tomorrow (i.e. projects).

Therefore it’s useful to review how the relative importance of broadcast industry trends has changed over time, because it provides a preview of where technology purchases will be made in the future. 

 

  • In 2009, the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index was dominated by the Transition to HDTV Operations, while multi-platform content delivery was fourth on the list

 

  • In 2010, multi-platform content delivery had become the most important industry trend, narrowly eclipsing file-based / tapeless workflows (which were combined in the 2010 index) and the transition to HDTV operations

 

  • In 2011 multi-platform content delivery became the dominant trend, where it remains in 2012

 


The chart below shows a comparison of the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index from 2011 and 2012. 

 

 

This chart shows that multi-platform content delivery continues to increase in overall importance relative to other trends in the broadcast industry.  Other net gainers in 2012 versus 2011 include file-based / tapeless workflows, the move to automated workflows, video-on-demand and improvements video compression efficiencies; all of which show year-over year increases in the Index ranking.

Both transition to HDTV operations and IP networking & content delivery declined in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, but stayed in the top four (where they have been since the inception of the Index in 2009).  Other notable decliners in 2012 versus 2011 were “transition to 3Gbps operations”, and “3D,” which saw the largest year-over-year decline on a percentage basis.

It should also be noted that the relatively strong showing of “cloud computing / cloud-based services” which was added to the Index in 2012, undoubtedly had a cannibalizing impact on these results.


To provide additional context on how the importance of technology trends in the broadcast industry changes over time, we have included a comparison of the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index from 2010 – 2012.

 

 

When reading this chart, please bear in mind that in each of the previous two years, one additional trend was added to the Index.  In 2011, analog switch-off was added.  In 2012 cloud computing / cloud-based services was added. 

New trends are added when appropriate (and based on stakeholder feedback), in order to keep the Index current and relevant to the needs of users.  However as discussed in a previous section, this can make it more difficult to perform year-over-year data analysis.  Thus we are providing as much information as possible in this report in order to enable readers to undertake an informed analysis.

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Changes in Numerical Ranking in the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

As shown below, there were some interesting changes in the numerical ranking of the trends covered in the 2012 Index.  The first column in the table below shows how trends were ranked in 2012. The number in parentheses to the right of each trend shows how it ranked in the 2011 BBS Index. Although there were no changes at the top and bottom of the 2012 Index versus the 2011 Index, there was movement in between.

 

 

Several trends were ranked more highly in 2012 than in 2011.  For example the transition to file-based / tapeless workflows moved up one spot to the #2 ranking (eclipsing the transition to HDTV operations for the first time in the Index), and the move to automated workflows also moved up.  

The combination of the strength of multi-platform content delivery, the strong showing of cloud computing, and the increasing importance of file-based workflows and automated operations has significant implications.  Broadcast technology buyers are clearly focused on creating efficiencies wherever possible, while at the same time working to generate new revenue streams through multi-screen offerings.

A number of trends dropped in the Index versus previous years, the most notable being 3D which had the largest year-over-year percentage drop.

Other trends remained relatively static in terms of their ranking in 2011.  For example: “transition to 3Gbps operations,” “transition to 5.1 channel audio,” “outsourced operations,” and “green initiatives” remained the bottom four trends in 2011, as they were in 2012.  However the addition of cloud computing, which ranked #7 in the Index dropped each of these trends down one position.

 

Changes in Commercial Importance of Broadcast Industry Trends

As well as changes to numerical ranking, there were also year-over-year changes to the perception of commercial importance to each trend.  This is shown in the table below:

 

 

For the most part, the trends that moved up in the rankings in 2012 were also seen as more important commercially versus the previous year. 

The common theme among the items on the left side of the above chart is that they all have to do with creating new revenue streams, or cutting costs through greater efficiencies.  Analog switch-off is perhaps the odd one out here, but given that these projects are mandated by governments, they become increasingly important where relevant until the time that these projects have ended.

The items on the right of the above chart are a mixed bag.  As a generalization it’s safe to say that that many of these trends involve spending rather than saving money.  Given that much of the industry is still recovering from recession, extra spending is not a popular choice in the current business environment.

 

Why Tracking Movement of Trends is Important

It is important to note that there is a difference between recognizing that a trend is commercially important and having a business plan in place that capitalizes on that trend.  As stated previously, our view is that industry trends drive capital projects, which in turn drive technology budgets, which in turn drive product purchase.  In other words, what technology buyers say is commercially important to their business in the future (i.e. trends) will likely turn into what they are budgeting for tomorrow (i.e. projects).

For example, the 2012 BBS Trend Index shows that monetizing content on multiple platforms is clearly a key objective for broadcast professionals in the year ahead, yet many players, particularly on the content side, are still experimenting with their business models. At some point these trends will drive capital projects.  When that happens they will become major drivers of technology spending in the broadcast industry. 

We will review what major capital projects are being planned this year in the broadcast industry in a subsequent article.

 

Keep in mind when reading this information that all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2012 BBS, regardless of organization type, organization size, job title or geographic location. Responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of the full 2012 BBS Global Market Report. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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Related Content:

The 2012 Big Broadcast Survey – Information and available reports

The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2010 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2009 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

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 © Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Largest-Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Top Industry Trends of 2012

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, market research, technology trends | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 05 2012

This is the first in a series of articles about some of the findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2012 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

 

The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

Each year, Devoncroft Partners conducts a large scale global study of the broadcast industry called the Big Broadcast Survey (BBS).  Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries participated in the 2012 BBS, making it the most comprehensive study ever done in the broadcast industry.

One of the key outputs from the BBS is the annual BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index. This is a ranking of the broadcast industry trends that are considered by BBS respondents to be the most commercially important to their businesses in any given year.

 

Changes to the Trends Measured In 2012

This is the fourth annual BBS study, and a lot has changed in the broadcast industry since we started in 2009.   In order to ensure that the trends we measure in the BBS are the most relevant to the industry we spend a consider amount of time each year seeking feedback about the structure of our reports from a wide variety of industry professionals including broadcasters, broadcast service providers, technology vendors and consultants.

Based on industry feedback, we added a 16th trend to our list this year: “cloud computing / cloud services.”  In 2011, we added “analog switch-off.”

Adding extra trends to the list we measure enables us to make sure that we are keeping our market studies up to date by tracking the most relevant issues facing the industry.

The trade-off is that by adding a new list to the trends we measure makes it more difficult to do a year-over-year comparison of these trends and how they have changed in priority over time.  Nevertheless we felt that the increasing importance of cloud-based technologies, services and business models was such that it warranted inclusion in our 2012 study.  Please note that the addition of cloud computing / cloud services likely “cannibalized” a small percentage of responses from other trends in this year’s ranking.

 

The Top Broadcast Industry Trends in 2012

To create the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, we presented BBS respondents with a list of 16 industry trends and asked them to tell us which one trend they consider to be “most important” to their business, which one trend they consider to be “second most important” to their business, and which other trends (plural) they consider to be “also very important.”

In order to create the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, we then apply a statistical weighting to these results, which is based on the commercial importance of each trend we measure.

Please note that our goal from this question is to help clients gain insight into the business drivers behind the respondent’s answer. Therefore, we asked this question in the context of commercial importance, rather than “industry buzz” or technology hype.

The table below shows the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index. Please note that this chart shows a weighted index, not measure the number of people that said which trend was most important to them.  Also please note that this chart measures the responses all non-vendors who participated in the 2012 BBS, regardless of company type, company size, geographic location, job title etc.  Thus the responses of any demographic group such as a particular company type or geographic location may vary widely from the results presented in this article.

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In 2012, multi-platform content delivery is clearly the dominant trend as broadcasters and content owners continue to refine their business models for the generation of new revenue streams through the monetization of video and audio assets. At the same time, technology vendors are continuing to develop solutions to repurpose content for optimal performance on any platform, and to run targeted ads alongside that content.

It’s interesting to note that since the first BBS was published in 2009, “multi-platform content delivery,” “transition to HDTV operations,” file-based / tapeless workflows,” and “IP networking and content delivery” have been at the top of the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trends Index.  However their relative position has shifted dramatically, with  “multi-platform content delivery” becoming increasingly important over the past four years (it was the number four trend in 2009, well behind that year’s top trend: transition to HDTV operations).

Although multi-platform content delivery is the headline in 2012, there are quite a few other interesting things to consider in the above chart.

For a number of years the transition to file-based workflows and the transition to HDTV operations have been major revenue drivers in the broadcast industry, and it appears that this will continue to be the case in 2012.  While there’s no doubt that these trends have been increasingly eclipsed by multi-platform content delivery, the key question is whether this translates into decreased capital expenditure for these projects.

We provide significant coverage of the global transition to file-based workflows and HDTV operations in the 2012 BBS Global Market Report (a paid for report). This includes a breakdown of where broadcasters are in their transition to HD, and a look at the upgrade plans for more than a dozen product categories. We’ll also be publishing more information here about project-based spending and the HD transition in future articles.

While on the topic of file-based workflows and the HD transition, it’s interesting to note that 2012 is the first year that the transition to file-based workflows has ranked higher than the transition to HDTV operations.   This is presumably due to the fact that many broadcasters have a firm grasp on their transition to HDTV – they understand what’s needed and how to achieve a smooth transition even if they have not made the move to HD yet.  This and the strong showing of “IP networking & content delivery” show that broadcast technology buyers continue to look for efficiencies as they transition to new technical platforms and business models.  The desire for broadcast technology buyers to gain operational efficiencies will likely continue to be a strong macro driver in 2012, as broadcasters continue to deploy new workflows.

The increasing importance of file-based technologies has implications for the broadcast industry in terms of both workflows and product procurement. Our previous research shows that broadcasters are moving to file-based workflows not only to achieve greater speed and efficiencies, but also to reduce cost. During the recession, technology budgets were typically prioritized towards solutions that add revenue and/or reduce cost. Now that the industry is recovering from the downturn, it’s likely that the way technology is purchased will remain focused on these commercial priorities.  For example the trend “move to automated workflows” ranked higher in 2012 than in previous years, further supporting the thesis that efficiency is an increasing priority for broadcast technology buyers.   We have recently completed several research projects for the IABM (the trade group that represents media technology suppliers worldwide), which provide more information on this topic.  These reports are available to IABM member companies through the IABM’s market intelligence portal as a benefit of IABM membership (disclaimer: I have a commercial relationship with the IABM).

As mentioned previously, “cloud computing / cloud based services” was added to the list of trends we measured in 2012.  It seems that you can’t read anything about technology these days (broadcast or otherwise) without coming across some mention of “the cloud.”  So it’s interesting to note that cloud technology is ranked #7 in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trends Index.  Why is something so important to so many people in the middle of the pack?  This is probably because there is still a lack of understanding widespread understanding about exactly how the cloud will impact the business models of broadcast technology buyers.  Nevertheless, it has made a strong showing this year, ahead of another previously much-hyped technology, 3D, which ranked #8 in 2011 and fell to #10 in 2012.

The rankings “improvements in video compression efficiency” and “video-on-demand” were static versus the previous year, while targeted advertising and 3D dropped several places each versus the previous year.

As with previous years, the bottom four trends were: “transition to 3Gbps operations”, “transition to 5.1 channel audio”, “outsourced operations” and “green initiatives”.

We’ll take a more in-depth look at the year-over-year changes in a subsequent post.

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Keep in mind when reading this information that all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2012 BBS, regardless of organization type, organization size, job title or geographic location. Responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of the full 2012 BBS Global Market Report. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

 

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Related Content:

The 2012 Big Broadcast Survey – Information and available reports

The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2010 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2009 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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My New Part-Time Role with the IABM

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 15 2011

As you may have seen from this press release, I’ve recently agreed to join the IABM on a part-time basis as the North American development officer.

After the announcement went out, I received many much-appreciated notes of congratulations. A few people also wanted to know what this means, so I thought I’d take a few minutes to explain.

For those who are not aware of the IABM, it’s the trade group that represents broadcast and media technology vendors worldwide.  I’ve been involved with the IABM for many years from when I worked for broadcast tech vendors, including a stint on the member’s board from 2006 – 2008.

I’m a fan of the IABM and I think it’s a very worthwhile organization.  It provides an array of unique services to its members as well many opportunities for networking.

When I started Devoncroft Partners one of the first things I did was form a partnership with the IABM. As a result, we offer IABM members generous discounts on our syndicated market research reports, and the IABM sells our BBS Global Market Report. In addition to this formal arrangement, we’ve remained close to the IABM and have participated in many of its activities over the past few years.

When Peter White (Director General of the IABM) asked me if I was interested in helping the IABM in the Americas I was concerned about any potential for perceived conflict of interest because both Devoncroft and the IABM produce and sell broadcast industry market intelligence.  Peter and I discussed this at length, and I also talked to many people in the broadcast industry including colleagues and clients.  The people I talked with were universally positive about the opportunity and no one thought there was any conflict of interest. Based on this positive feedback, and my belief that I can make a difference for the IABM in the Americas, I decided to sign on with them.

The aim of this role is to help the IABM increase its visibility in the Americas, and also to help them promote and sell their various research offerings.  This fits in nicely with our existing business at Devoncroft as it continues to grow, expand and take on new clients and projects. My view is that this move will benefit both Devoncroft and the IABM as we move forward.

A Look at How the Recession Affected Broadcast Technology Vendors

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast technology vendor financials | Posted by Joe Zaller
Sep 29 2010

Last week I wrote an article about how the recession impacted the technology budgets of broadcasters and other purchasers of broadcast technology products.

This showed that broadcast technology spending in EMEA held up better than in the Americas, which was hit particularly hard by the recession.  For example, 40% of respondents from the Americas reported that their budgets for 2010 were lower than in the previous year.  

So how did this reduction in spending affect the sales of vendors who supply hardware and software products to these customers?

To find out, we asked just under 800 broadcast technology vendors who participated in the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey how their company’s revenues had changed over the past year in terms of percentage growth or decline.

On an overall basis, 45% of vendors reported that their sales had either declined or stayed the same versus the previous year, and about half of respondents reported that their sales had increased – in some cases by quite a bit.

When I saw these results I wanted to know the detail behind them so that I could figure out if one type of vendor had fared better than others, and if so what were the determining factors.

For example: was company size a factor? How about location, type of products sold, or whether the vendor is a “pure-play” broadcast company or a one that operates in multiple markets including broadcast?

Based on these questions, I decided to break out the results by a variety of demographic factors, as shown in the chart below:

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When the results are viewed this way it appears that the largest companies were the most impacted by the recession. 53% of respondents from vendors with 1,000+ employees reported that their sales had either declined or stayed the same. 

Large companies were closely followed by respondents based in the Americas, and those from firms that primarily supply hardware products.  More than half of these respondents reported that their sales had either declined or stayed the same versus the previous year.

In terms of pure-play versus non-pure-play broadcast vendors, respondents from firms that sell more than 80%+ of their products into the broadcast industry fared slightly worse than those who sell 20% or less of their products into the industry.

So which vendors reported the most growth?  The short answer is small companies, software vendors and VC funded private firms (many of whom are undoubtedly small providers of software products).  

In terms of overall growth 50% of vendors reported that their revenues had increased versus the previous year. However when you consider companies who provide primarily software products, this number jumps to 62% of respondents.

What about the respondents who said their company’s revenues increased the most? Again, software companies lead the way.  21% of respondents from vendors that sell primarily software products, and 18% of privately held VC-backed companies, reported that their revenue grew by more than 30% versus the previous year. And 18% of small companies (those with 50 employees or less) also reported that their revenues had increased by 30% or more.

When reading these results it’s of course important to keep in mind that revenue growth is one thing, but profitability is another. 

This analysis does not consider the profitability of vendors, but I recently wrote about the findings of a recent IABM study in this area as part of a post on my impressions of IBC 2010.

In that post I reported that during an IBC session on the state of the industry, IABM Director General Peter White stated that about 60% of broadcast technology suppliers are now making a profit – up considerably from last year – with European companies performing better in terms of profit performance.   For more information on these results, I encourage you to contact the IABM.

If you’re interested in more information about how broadcast technology vendors responded to the 2010 Big Broadcast survey, please contact me and I’ll try to give you the information you need.

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This article is based on the findings from the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of industry trends, technology purchasing behavior and the opinion of vendor brands.  With more than 5,600 people in 120+ countries participating, the 2010 version of the BBS is the largest and most comprehensive market study ever done in the broadcast industry.

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