Posts Tagged ‘Grass Valley’

2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) Reports Now Available

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, market research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 15 2014

After months of data collection, analysis, and visualization, we have now completed work on the 2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS). Reports from this study have now been published and are available from Devoncroft Partners.

If you’re not familiar with the BBS, it’s the most comprehensive annual study of technology end-users in the global broadcast industry. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries participated in the 2014 BBS, making it once again the largest market study of the broadcast industry.

BBS reports have been designed to help readers improve their strategic decision-making, customer engagement, marketing strategy, product planning, and sales execution.  BBS reports are also used frequently for M&A-related activities by both buyers and sellers.

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Three types of 2014 BBS reports are available:

  • 2014 BBS Global Brand Reports:  provides deep insight into how each more than 100 broadcast technology suppliers (see full list below) are perceived by market participants, along with comprehensive benchmarking of broadcast technology vendors on a wide variety of metrics.

 

  • 2014 BBS Product Reports:  provide detailed information from buyers, specifiers, and users of broadcast technology products in 31 separate categories (see full list below)

 

  • 2014 BBS Global Market Report: provides detailed information about industry trends, major projects being planned, products being evaluated for purchase, current and future plant infrastructure, broadcast technology CapEx budgets, and planned deployment of new technologies including 4K, Connected TV, and Social TV.

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If you would like information about these reports and how they can help your business, please get in touch.

 

In addition to these paid-for reports, we will also be publishing highlights from the 2014 BBS on the Devoncroft website.  These articles will be posted on a semi-regular basis, so please check back often.

To receive posts when they are published, just enter your email in the box in the upper right-hand corner of the page.

 

The tables below show the product categories and broadcast technology vendor brands covered in the 2014 BBS.

 

 Product Categories Covered in the 2014 BBS:

2014 BBS -- Product Categories Covered in the 2014 Big Broadcast Survey

 

 

Broadcast Technology Brands Covered in the 2014 BBS:

 

2014 BBS -- All Brands included in 2014 BBS

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.© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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Belden Makes it Official – Combination of Grass Valley and Miranda to be Called Grass Valley

broadcast industry trends, Broadcast Vendor M&A | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 02 2014

One day after Belden completed its $220m acquisition of Grass Valley, the company has officially revealed that the combined company will be called Grass Valley.

The company branding combines Grass Valley’s “GV” script and Miranda’s trademark, purple ellipse.

If you want to hear what’s next for the new Grass Valley, be sure to attend the annual IABM Annual NAB State of the Industry Breakfast at the 2014 NAB Show, where Grass Valley Marco Lopez will be featured on a panel of technology vendor CEOs that also includes Brian Cram from Dejero Labs, Charlie Vogt from Imagine Communications (formerly Harris Broadcast), and Carl Dempsey from Wohler Technologies.

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Combined GV-Miranda Logo

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Related Content:

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Completes Acquisition of Grass Valley, Will Invest $25 Million in Integration of Combined Business

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Buys Grass Valley for $220 Million

2014 NAB Show Session Details – IABM Annual NAB State of the Industry Breakfast

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Completes Acquisition of Grass Valley, Will Invest $25 Million in Integration of Combined Business

Broadcast technology vendor financials, Broadcast Vendor M&A | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 01 2014

Belden announced that it has completed the acquisition of the previously announced offer to purchase Grass Valley. When the deal was announced in February 2014, Benden CFO Henk Derksen told equity analysts that the $220m deal would be funded with existing cash.

Grass Valley had approximately $290 million in revenue according to Belden’ press release, so the deal values Grass Valley at 0.75 revenue.

It is believed that the enlarged company will be branded Grass Valley.

According to Belden, the value of the combination of the two companies is clear for both customers and shareholders is clear. The company says that by aligning both resources and strategies, the business will have a broader offering, while realizing the benefits of scale.

Belden also says the combined company “will be able to deliver the ability to simplify the purchasing and management of highly complex infrastructures.”

Belden says acquisition of Grass Valley will be immediately accretive to adjusted earnings per share with an estimated impact of approximately $0.20 in 2014 and $0.50 in 2015.

Much of the increased profitability of the new company is likely to come through synergy savings.

One of the hallmarks and core competencies of the Belden team is the efficient integration of acquired companies into the Belden family, and the associated inculcation with the “Belden Business System, including LEAN enterprise techniques and the Market Delivery System.”

There are many examples of Belden buying underperforming companies and subsequently using its internal processes to achieve strong financial performance and operating return.

Indeed, the company says “there is a significant opportunity in the application of the Belden Business System” in the case of Grass Valley

Derksen told analysts at the time of the announcement that Belden plans “to invest approximately $25 million during the first 12 months of integration largely through restructuring efforts to capture the value of the combined company. The strategic actions will include cost actualization, manufacturing footprint and leveraging a combined sales and marketing function and the implementation of lean principles.”

At same time Belden CEO John Stroup said “the result of the integration is unlikely to include meaningful reductions in R&D investment. However, I think there’s going to be an opportunity for Miranda to throttle back on some investments where Grass Valley’s stronger and for Grass Valley to throttle back on opportunities where Miranda’s stronger. Manufacturing is a clear opportunity. Today, Grass Valley outsources a lot of their manufacturing. We think there’s an opportunity for us to leverage our existing fixed cost structure, absorb that manufacturing. So that’s a clear opportunity to create value in the combined business and there’s clearly an opportunity to leverage our global sales force. Both of us at 200 and 300 million respectively, have created a global sales force calling on the same customers and we see a clear opportunity to improve our efficiency there. So the assumptions that we have in place include manufacturing cost synergies as well as the opportunity to leverage the combined sales organization, both in terms of cost and revenue.”

 

The following slides show the strategic rationale for the Miranda – Grass Valley merger, as explained by Belden in February 2014.

 

Belden Buys Grass - 1

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Belden Buys Grass - 2.

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Belden Buys Grass - 3

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Belden Buys Grass - 4

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Belden Buys Grass - 5

 

 

Given that it is believed that the combined company will be branded as Grass Valley, the deal marks a new beginning rather than the end of the road for the formidable broadcast brand.

Prior to officially becoming part of Belden, what is now Grass Valley has been through a number of strategic changes in the last 10-15 years.

This started in December 2000 when Thomson purchased Philips Professional, which at that time had revenue of approximately 250m Euros, and employed 1,050 people. Philips products, which included cameras, film imaging, signal processing, media networking & control, and systems integration services, became part of Thomson Multimedia.

After the Philips acquisition, the combined company, which was renamed Thomson Multimedia, had combined revenue of approximately 366m Euros.

In 2001, Thomson bought Grass Valley in 2001 for $172m.  At that time, Grass Valley had revenues of about $200m.

Technicolor then went on a buying spree, acquiring multiple companies that were ultimately folded into the Grass Valley brand.

Thomson added to its Grass Valley holdings with the 2005 acquisition Canopus for more than $100m.

By the late 2000s Thomson – which had by this time changed its name to Technicolor – put Grass Valley on the block, initially with what has been described as a very high price tag.

After several rumored bids, and more than a year on the block Technicolor sold what is now Grass Valley to Francisco Partners, a San Francisco – based private equity firm.

Technicolor retained other parts of the business, including transmitters and head-end equipment, and later sold-off these assets in two separate transactions.

Technicolor sold the Grass Valley transmission business to PARTER Capital Group.

The Grass Valley head-end business was sold to FCDE in March 2011.

Grass Valley is one of the industry’s great companies and I am sure that the people there are happy to finally have resolved their fate.  Let’s hope they can now focus on making great products – and of course money for their new owners.

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Related Content:

Press Release: Belden Announces Successful Completion of Grass Valley Acquisition

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Buys Grass Valley for $220 Million

Press Release: Technicolor to sell its Broadcast Services activity to Ericsson

Belden Q3 2012 Revenue Declines 6 Percent, Miranda “Off to a Slow Start”

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Miranda Buys Softel

Belden Closes Deal to Acquire Miranda

More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Buys Miranda for $350 Million in All-Cash Deal

More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Technicolor Closes Deal to Dispose of Grass Valley Transmission Business

Technicolor Receives Binding Offer for Video Head-End Business

Technicolor decides not to sell digital signage provider PRN

Technicolor completes sale of Grass Valley to Francisco Partners

 

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Buys Grass Valley for $220 Million

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Feb 06 2014

Belden has submitted a binding offer to purchase privately held Grass Valley, a leader within the broadcast market, for $220 million.

The binding offer is subject to consultation with Grass Valley’s foreign labor works council, after which we will enter into a definitive agreement. Grass Valley provides innovative technologies including production switchers, cameras, servers, and editing solutions within the mission critical applications of broadcast customers. When combined with Miranda, the resulting end-to-end solution will be the most complete and compelling in the industry.

Grass Valley had approximately $290 million in revenue according to Belden’ press release, so the deal values Grass Valley at 0.75 revenue.

Even so, it’s probably not a bad deal for Grass Valley’s owner, PE firm Francisco Partners, which  purchased Grass Valley from Technicolor in 2011 (closed in January 2011), for no money down, and an $80 million promissory not payable five years from the date of the deal.

Part of Francisco Partner’s deal to buy Grass Valley included an undisclosed additional pay-out if Francisco Partners sold Grass Valley for a partner in the future.  Since these numbers are unknown, it’s difficult to know if the payments were triggered.

“The great thing about this overlap is the limited overlap,” said Belden CEO John Stroup.

“We are extremely excited to have Grass Valley join the Belden family. By combining Grass Valley and Miranda, we will create the broadcast industry’s largest and most complete portfolio,” said Mr. Stroup.

 

Here’s info on the deal and the rationale for it:

 

Belden Buys Grass - 1

Belden Buys Grass - 2

Belden Buys Grass - 3

 

Belden Buys Grass - 4

 

 

Belden Buys Grass - 5


Belden Buys Grass - 6


Related Content:

Press Release: Belden Reports Solid Results in Fourth Quarter 2013 and Announces Binding Offer to Acquire Privately Held Grass Valley for $220 Million

Press Release: Technicolor to sell its Broadcast Services activity to Ericsson

Belden Q3 2012 Revenue Declines 6 Percent, Miranda “Off to a Slow Start”

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Miranda Buys Softel

Belden Closes Deal to Acquire Miranda

More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Belden Buys Miranda for $350 Million in All-Cash Deal

More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Technicolor Closes Deal to Dispose of Grass Valley Transmission Business

Technicolor Receives Binding Offer for Video Head-End Business

Technicolor decides not to sell digital signage provider PRN

Technicolor completes sale of Grass Valley to Francisco Partners

 

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 2 – The 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, market research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 05 2013

This is the sixth in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 

Previous articles about the 2013 BBS discussed the most important broadcast industry trends, how the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends have changed over time, where money is currently being spent in the broadcast industry, broadcast technology products being evaluated for purchase in 2013 and 2014, and the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table.

 

This is the second in a series of posts about how broadcast technology vendors were ranked and benchmarked on a variety of metrics by the respondents to the 2013 BBS.

The first post in this series described the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, which shows how 2013 BBS respondents ranked broadcast vendor brands.

This post looks at how the global sample of broadcast professionals who participated in the 2013 BBS ranked their Net Change of Overall Opinion of the 151 broadcast technology vendors we covered in the study.

 

Net Change of Overall Opinion

While it’s good news for any vendor to achieve a good “overall opinion” ranking, this metric is somewhat one-sided because it relies solely on the positive opinions of respondents.

In order to get a better understanding of how broadcast technology vendor brands are perceived, it is necessary to look at both the positive and negative opinions of brands. It is also necessary to take into account how these opinions have changed over time.

Once this information has been collected, we use it to create the Net Change of Overall Opinion Ranking, a metric that demonstrates which brands are perceived as getting better, and which are in decline, on an overall basis. Net Change in Overall Opinion provides a more balanced view each brand because it takes into account both the positive and negative perceptions of brands, along with how these opinions have changed over time.

An explanation of how these results were calculated can be found at the end of this article.

The complete list of vendor brands covered in the 2013 BBS is here.

 

The Net Change in Overall Opinion findings from the 2013 BBS are shown below in two ways:

  • An overall industry “league table” that shows the 30 highest ranked vendors for the metric “Net Change of Overall Opinion.”  The data in this chart is broken out globally and regionally.

 

  • An analysis of the “frequency” of appearance of each vendor in the Net Change of Overall Opinion league table

 

The top 30 ranked brands for Net Change of Overall Opinion are shown below for both the global sample of all respondents as well as for all respondents in each of the geographic regions.

When reading these results, please keep the following in mind.

 

Both audio and video brands are included in these rankings, and all response data shown herein is from the global sample of from all 2013 BBS participants, regardless of organization type, size, geographic location, or size of budget; and that actual results in the BBS Brand report may be different.

Please note that inclusion of any brand in any cut of the data shown the tables in this article is dependent on available sample size.  The minimum sample size for inclusion in these charts is 30 respondents per cut of the data. Therefore it is possible that a highly regarded brand was excluded from these findings based on sample size.

In all cases, these results are shown in alphabetical order, NOT in the order in which they were ranked by respondents to the study.


The 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table:

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion

 

 

A total of 53 broadcast technology vendor brands are included in this table (versus 59 in 2012 and 51 in 2011), illustrating the geographic variation of opinion. Analysis of these results shows that are some clear market leaders on a global basis, while others are strong on a regional basis.

It’s useful to understand how often each brand appears in the 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table.

This is shown below, along with the equivalent data from both 2012 and 2011 for comparison.

 

Frequency of appearance of brands in the 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 10 brands appear four times (compared to 9 brands in 2012 and 13 brands in 2011), meaning they were ranked in the top 30 globally and in each geographic region

 

  • 13 brands appear three times (compared to 13 brands in 2012 and 10 brands in 2011)

 

  • 11 brands appear two times (compared to 11 brands in 2012 and 9 brands in 2011)

 

  • 19 brands appear one time (compared to 26 brands in 2102 and 19 brands in 2011).  This illustrates a fragmentation of opinion  about many brands based on geography

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Brands appearing four times in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

 

  • 2013 BBS: Adobe, Aja Video, Autodesk, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Evertz, Panasonic, Riedel, Rohde & Schwarz, Sennheiser

 

  • 2012 BBS: Adobe, Avid, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Harmonic, Panasonic, Riedel, Sennheiser, Sony

 

  • 2011 BBS: Adobe, Aja Video, Apple, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Cisco, Genelec, Omneon, Panasonic, Riedel, Sennheiser, Sony, Tektronix

 

 

Brands appearing three times in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 2013 BBS: AmberFin, Angenieux, ateme, Cisco, Elemental Technologies, EVS, Harmonic, NewTek, Ross Video, Sony, Telestream, Vizrt, Wide Orbit

 

  • 2012 BBS: Aja Video, Apple, Autodesk, Digital Rapids, EVS, Front Porch Digital, NewTek, Omneon, Phabrix, Rhozet, Ross Video, Vizrt

 

  • 2011 BBS: Ateme,  Evertz, EVS, Harmonic, Net Insight, Rhozet, Rohde & Schwarz, Ross Video, Shure, Vizrt

 

 

Brands appearing two times in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

 

  • 2013 BBS: Adam, Ensemble, Front Porch Digital, Lawo, Net Insight, Neumann, Nevion, Phabrix, Screen Service, Snell, Solid State Logic

 

  • 2012 BBS: AmberFin, ateme, brightcove, Cisco, Gigawave, Net Insight, Rohde & Schwarz, Screen Service, Tektronix, Telecast, Wohler

 

  • 2011 BBS: AKG, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Ensemble,  Front Porch Digital, Lawo, Telestream, TVIPS, Wohler

 

 

Brands appearing once in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 2013 BBS: arvato / S4M, Avid, Axon, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Fujinon, Linear Acoustic, On-Air (Oasys), Ooyala, RTW, Shure, Soundcraft, Studer, Tektronix, Telecast, TVIPS, Wheatstone, Xen Data, Yamaha

 

  • 2012 BBS: Aspera, Axon, Calrec, Clear-Com, Dolby, Elemental Technologies, Ensemble, Envivio, Evertz, Genelec, Harris, Isilon Systems / EMC, Kaltura, Kit Digital, Lawo, Neumann, PubliTronic / Grass Valley, RTW, Schoeps, Shure, Snell, Telestream, Wheatstone, Wide Orbit, Wowza, Yamaha

 

  • 2011 BBS: AmberFin, Audio-Technica, Avid, Fujinon, Grass Valley, Harris, Inlet Technologies, Linear, Linear Acoustic, Miranda, MSA Focus, Nevion, Playbox, PubliTronic, Schoeps, Screen Service, Solid State Logic, Telecast, Yamaha

 

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Frequency Analysis of the Brands in the in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:  

In order to provide a better understanding of which brands were most highly ranked in each geographic region, the data has been provided in the table below, which shows the global and regional performance for each brand in the top 30 ranking of overall opinion.

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2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion -- Frequency Analysis

 

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This frequency analysis chart shows that there are some interesting geographic variations in the data. Here’s a closer look at how brands appeared by geography:

 

Appearing only in the global ranking of the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

Four brands achieved a top 30 ranking in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion league table, despite not being listed in the top 30 of any of the three geographic regions.  This may be a function of sample size.  As discussed above, there is a minimum sample size requirement for inclusion in each cut of the data presented in these chart, and the global ranking, by definition, has the largest overall sample.

  • Ensemble, On-Air Systems, Ooyala, Xen Data

 

Appearing only in one region of the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

The following  brands appear in one regional category of the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table, but do not appear in the global ranking:

  • Arvato/S4m, Avid, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Fujinon, Linear Acoustic, RTW, Shure, Soundcraft, Studer, Tektronix, Telecast, T-VIPS, Yamaha

 

Appearing only in the EMEA region in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Arvato/S4m, Axon, RTW

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Appearing only in the Asia-Pacific region in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Avid, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Fujinon, Shure, Soundcraft, Studer, Tektronix, Yamaha

 

Appearing only in the Americas region in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Telecast, T-VIPS, Wheatstone

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How These Results Were Calculated

No company is perfect, and the brands we measured in the 2013 BBS are no different.  All brands in the 2013 BBS had both positive (got better) and negative (got worse) connotations associated with them.  There were also are significant percentage of respondents who said their opinion of a brand had “stayed the same.”

2013 BBS participants were asked to rank their opinion of broadcast technology vendor brands on a scale of 1-10 — with 10 being best in the market, and 1 being worst in the market.

We then asked respondents whether their opinion of these brands has changed over the last few years – specifically whether they feel their opinion of each brand has “improved,” “declined” or “stayed the same.”

The Net Change in Overall Opinion for each brand was then calculated by subtracting the percentage of respondents who said a brand “got worse” from the percentage of respondents who said their opinion of a brand had “got better,” while ignoring the “stayed the same” responses.

This “change of opinion data” provides a more comprehensive view of how each brand is perceived by the market because it takes into account positive and negative perceptions.

 

 

Please note that inclusion of any brand in the tables in this article is dependent on available sample size.  The minimum sample size for inclusion in the tables shown herein is 30 respondents per cut of the data. Therefore it is possible that a highly regarded brand may have been excluded from any or all of the tables in this article due to insufficient sample size.

Also, please keep in mind when reviewing this information that all data these charts are presented in alphabetical order, NOT in the order brands were ranked by respondents to the 2013 BBS.

 

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The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Previous Year:  The 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 10 2013

This is the fifth in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

Previous articles about the 2013 BBS discussed the most important broadcast industry trends, how the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends have changed over time, where money is currently being spent in the broadcast industry, and broadcast technology products being evaluated for purchase in 2013 and 2014.

 

How 2013 BBS Participants Ranked Broadcast Technology Vendors

This is the first in a series of posts about how broadcast technology vendors were ranked and benchmarked on a variety of metrics by the respondents to the 2013 BBS.

Each year, as part of the Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), we ask a global sample of broadcast professionals to rank a variety of technology vendor brands on a wide range of metrics.

We use this information to create a series of reports, which through benchmarking and industry “league tables” provides a view as to how each vendor is positioned in the market relative to the industry as a whole, as well as against their direct competitors.

This post looks at how the global sample of broadcast professionals who participated in the 2013 BBS ranked their overall opinion of the 151 broadcast technology vendors we covered in the study.

An explanation of how these results were calculated can be found at the end of this article. The complete list of vendor brands covered in the 2013 BBS is here.

 

Research findings are displayed in two ways in this article:

  • An overall industry “league table” that shows the 30 highest ranked vendors for the metric “overall opinion.”  The data in this chart is broken out globally and regionally

 

  • An analysis of the “frequency” of appearance in the “overall opinion league table”

 

The top 30 ranked brands for overall opinion are shown below for both the global sample of all respondents as well as for all respondents in each of the geographic regions.

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Please note that in all cases, these results are shown in alphabetical order, NOT in the order in which they were ranked by 2103 BBS participants.      

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2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table (smaller)

 

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A total of 46 broadcast technology vendor brands are included in this table, (versus 48 in 2012 and 43 in 2011), illustrating the geographic variation of opinion, which will be discussed later.

In terms of frequency of appearance in the above ranking:

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  • 17 brands appear four times, meaning they were ranked in the top 30 globally and in each of the three geographic regions.  For comparison, in the 2012 BBS (when we covered 152 brands) there were 15 brands that appeared in the top 30 globally and in each of the 3 regions.

 

  •  9 brands appear three times, versus 10 brands that appeared three times last year.

 

  • 5 brands appear two times, versus 7 brands that appeared two times last year. 

 

  • 15 brands appear one time, which demonstrates that some brands are strongest in one geographic area. In the 2012 BBS, 16 brands appeared one time.

 

Analysis of the data shows that are some clear market leaders on a global basis, while others are strong on a regional basis.

A breakdown of how many times each company appears in the ranking shows how many times each brand appears in the chart above.

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Brands appearing four times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table: 

The following brands are listed four times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, meaning that research participants ranked them in the top 30 for overall opinion globally, as well as in each of the three geographic regions:

  • Adobe, Aja Video, AKG, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Cisco, Dolby, Genelec, Neumann, Panasonic, Rohde & Schwarz, Sennheiser, Shure, Solid State Logic, Sony, Studer, and Tektronix

 

Although many of these brands also appeared four times in the BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table last year, there are also several changes to the composition of this list.

The following brands that appear in all four categories (global, EMEA, APAC, Americas) in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table were listed fewer than four times in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table. The numbers shown in parentheses show the number of times each brand was listed in the BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table last year, and the year-over year change:

  • Aja Video (2x, +2), Blackmagic Design (1x, +3), Rohde & Schwarz (3x, +1), Solid State Logic (2x, +2), Studer (2x, +2)

 

The following brands were listed in all four categories in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and appear fewer than four times in 2013:

  • Apple, Avid, Schoeps

 

 

Brands appearing three times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table: 

The following brands are listed three times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table.

The numbers shown in parentheses show the number of times each brand was listed in the BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table last year, and the year-over year change:

  • Angenieux (3x, no change), Avid (4x, -1), Clear-Com (3x, no change), EVS (1x, +2), Fujinon (3x, no change), JBL (3x, no change), Schoeps (4x, -1), Snell (2x, +1), Yamaha (3x, no change)

 

The following brands were listed in three categories in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and appear fewer than three times in 2013:

  • Autodesk, beyerdynamic, Ikegami, Wohler

 

 

Brands appearing two times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table:

The following brands are listed two times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table.

The numbers shown in parentheses show the number of times each brand was listed in the BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table last year, and the year-over year change:

  • Apple (4x -2), Autodesk (3x, -1), beyerdynamic (3x, -1), Mackie (+2), Soundcraft (+2)

 

The following brands were listed in two categories in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and appear fewer than two times in 2013:

  • Electro Voice, Grass Valley, RTW

 

 

Brands appearing one time in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table:

The following brands are listed one time in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table.

The numbers shown in parentheses show the number of times each brand was listed in the BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table last year, and the year-over year change:

  • Adam (no change), Audio-Technica (+1), Barco (+1), Evertz (no change), Grass Valley (2x, -1), HP (no change), Ikegami (3x, -2), Lawo (no change), Leader (+1), NEC (no change), Riedel (no change), RTS Intercom Systems (no change), RTW (2x, -1), Wheatstone (+1), Wohler (3x, -2)

 

The following brands were listed in one category in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and are not listed in 2013:

  • DK Technologies, Harmonic, Harris, Omneon (not covered in 2013 BBS), Salzbrenner Stagetec, Telex, Thomson

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Frequency Analysis of the Brands in the in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table:  

The table below, which shows the global and regional performance for each brand in the top 30 ranking of overall opinion, provides a better understanding of where each brand was highly ranked for overall opinion.

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2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table Frequency Analysis (smaller)

 

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The frequency chart shows some interesting geographic variations in the data, which is detailed below.

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Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking globally + one region

Three brands achieved a top 30 ranking globally, despite being in the top 30 of only one out of the three geographic regions.

  • Apple, Autodesk, beyerdynamic

 

Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking in one region

The following 15 brands did not make the top 30 in the global league table of overall opinion, but they did appear in the top 30 overall opinion ranking in one of the geographic regions:

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Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking only in EMEA

  • Barco, Lawo, Riedel, RTW

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Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking only in Asia-Pacific

  • Audio-Technica, Evertz, HP, Leader, NEC

 

Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking only in the Americas

  • Adam, Grass Valley, Ikegami, RTS Intercom Systems, Wheatstone, Wohler

 

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How These Results Were Calculated

2013 BBS participants were asked to rank their opinion of broadcast technology vendor brands on a scale of 1-10 — with 10 being best in the market, and 1 being worst in the market.

This data was then aggregated and averaged in order to generate the global score for each brand based on these responses. In order to create the regional scores, this data was broken out geographically based on the location of the respondent.

The top 30 brands for each of the four ranking lists (global, EMEA, Asia-Pacific, Americas) was sorted by alphabetical order to create the tables shown in this article.

Please note that inclusion of any brand in the tables in this article is dependent on available sample size.  The minimum sample size for inclusion in the tables shown herein is 30 respondents per cut of the data. Therefore it is possible that a highly regarded brand may have been excluded from any or all of the tables in this article due to insufficient sample size.

Also, please keep in mind when reviewing this information that all data these charts are presented in alphabetical order, NOT in the order brands were ranked by respondents to the 2013 BBS.

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The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

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Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

Previous Year: The 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Screen Service Targeted in €30.5m Takeover Bid

Broadcast technology vendor financials, Broadcast Vendor M&A | Posted by Joe Zaller
Oct 22 2012

Italian broadcast transmitter vendor Screen Service became the target of a €30.5m takeover bid launched by Monte Bianco, according to a filing with the Milan Stock Exchange.

The bid values Screen Service, which for the first half of its financial year posted a loss of €3.67 on revenue of €25.1m, at a 35% premium over its previous stock price.

Monte Bianco, which is backed by French PE firm HLD, said it had not previously discussed the proposed deal with any of the shareholders of Screen Service, including Opera who own about 30% of the company.

Monte Bianco, who currently has an holds about 1.2% of Screen Service’s shares, said the proposed deal will increase the competitiveness of Screen Service, and ensure its medium and long term growth.

Screen Service is based in Brescia, Italy also has operations in the US and Brazil.  In July 2012, the company paid €1.1m to up its stake in its Brazilian subsidiary to 75% from 60%.

This is the second PE-backed deal for a broadcast transmitter in the last two years.  In April 2011, Technicolor announced that it had sold the Grass Valley transmission business to PARTER Capital Group for a “non-material” amount.  At that time Technicolor said that the Grass Valley transmission business has 291 employees and posted a loss in 2009 of revenues of approximately €43m.

The Harris broadcast communications division (BCD), which supplies broadcast transmitters along with a wide variety of other products, is currently being divested by its parent company, Harris Corporation.  It is believed that Harris BCD posted revenue of approximately $500m in its last fiscal year, but transmitter revenues were not broken out.

Although many in the broadcast industry may perceive transmitter as “old technology,” Harris BCD president Harris Morris said at the IBC 2012 exhibition that the company’s transmitter business are the “tip of the spear” into high growth emerging markets.  According to Morris, when countries in emerging markets make the transition to digital broadcasting one of the first things they buy is a transmitter, so  Harris BCD is able to sell through its additional elements of its product line on the back of these deals.

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Related Content:

Reuters Article: French group launches bid for Italy’s Screen Service

More Broadcast Vendor M&A: Technicolor Closes Deal to Dispose of Grass Valley Transmission Business

Analyzing the Sale of the Harris Broadcast Division

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Impressions of IBC 2012: M&A, Cloud, Multi-Platform, 4K, Efficient Operations, CiaB, and the “Return of Grass Valley”

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, content delivery, market research, technology trends | Posted by Joe Zaller
Sep 20 2012

A previous version of this article appeared in the “Tech Thursday” Spotlight Section of TVNewsCheck

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Against the backdrop of the ongoing European debt crisis and the afterglow of the 2012 Olympics, nearly 51,000 visitors made their way to Amsterdam for the annual IBC trade show. Major themes of the five-day broadcast technology jamboree included vendor consolidation, buzz about new technologies for multi-screen content delivery and social TV, futuristic technology demonstrations, and several important new product introductions.

The broadcast vendor community got a little less fragmented on the first morning of IBC, with a merger announcement by two Norway-based video transport technology providers — Nevion and T-VIPS

Although no additional deals were unveiled at the show, vendor consolidation was one of the most discussed themes at IBC, and according to statements made by some of the leading vendors, there is potentially a lot more consolidation on the way.   

Newly acquired Miranda technologies made its debut as a “Belden brand” at IBC, and Belden EVP Denis Suggs was on hand at the show to meet customers and explain his company’s vision for the broadcast industry, and why they decided to buy Miranda in one of the largest broadcast technology M&A deals in recent years. 

In a nutshell, Belden saw the opportunity to acquire a cash-generating company with a top-class management team that’s growing faster than the overall market and jumped at it. Including Miranda, Belden now generates approximately $450 million a year in broadcast-related revenue, making it one of the industry’s largest players, and it appears they are not done doing deals in this space. 

Suggs said Belden views Miranda as a platform from which is can further expand its broadcast industry operations, and that it intends to support Miranda’s existing plan for further acquisitions.

Grass Valley CEO Alain Andreoli echoed a similar sentiment at his company’s press conference. He said that Francisco Partners, the private equity firm that owns Grass Valley, has a $3 billion fund behind it and will support Grass Valley’s efforts to become an industry consolidators.

When the dust settles, he said, Grass Valley may not be the largest player, but it will certainly be in the top three. Last year, Grass Valley bought PubliTronic, a provider of channel-in-a-box (CiaB) technology, to gain a larger foothold in the playout market. Expect to see Grass Valley and other players making additional strategic moves that help them enter attractive new market spaces.

But most IBC M&A talk centered on Harris Broadcast, which is currently being divested by its parent company. Although rumors were flying at the show about who might buy the division, its executives were tight-lipped. Harris Broadcast President Harris Morris would only say that the deal is progressing according to plan, and is on track to be completed as soon as the end of 2012.

New products and services based on cloud technology, multi-platform content delivery and social TV services dominated many demonstration and hallway conversations at IBC, particularly in the “Connected World” pavilion, where dozens of new and established firms displayed a host of products aimed at securing a place in this emerging ecosystem.

Despite the enthusiasm of vendors, many buyers publicly and privately expressed caution about the technology.

Critics of cloud technology cited immature technology, bandwidth limitations, security, and an unproven business case as barriers to its adoption. Likewise, broadcasters and content owners expressed concern over the “disconnect” between the desire of end-users to receive and consume video content on an ever-increasing number personal devices, and the ability of broadcasters to create sustainable and profitable multi-platform business models.

Cloud-based discussions at IBC ranged from real-world case studies of how EVS helped broadcasters set up private clouds to facilitate remote production of the Euro 2012 soccer championships and London Olympics, to practical solutions from Signiant and Aspera for managing the delivery of file-based content over IP-enabled and cloud-based infrastructure, to new solutions for cloud-based video production.

Cloud-based production is an emerging trend, but initiatives such as the ‘Adobe Anywhere’ initiative will prove to be a catalyst in this area. Taking cloud-based production to the “next level” are new firms like VC-backed start-up A-Frame, which is building from the ground-up a complete cloud-based video production environment that marries the experience of broadcast and post-production experts with forward-thinking IT-based software experts. 

On the multi-screen front, Ericsson introduced its first encoder based on HEVC/H.265 compression technology. The company says that its HEVC implementation offers the potential for users to reduce bandwidth by up to 50%, thereby enabling more efficient delivery of content over multiple platforms, including mobile networks.

Harmonic unveiled a new version of its ProMedia transcoder, aimed at enabling its customers to deliver an integrated multi-screen experience to their subscribers. Harmonic also introduced new members of its senior management team: CMO Peter Alexander, and CTO Krish Padmanabhan, who recently joined the company from Cisco and NetApp, respectively.

Noticeable by their absence on the Harmonic booth at IBC were the familiar Omneon and Rhozet brand names, which have now been absorbed into Harmonic. “Harmonic is a branded house, not a house of brands, and our singular focus is delivering excellent video quality to consumers everywhere,” said Alexander.

The Sony/SES Astra demonstration of live delivery of 4K images over satellite drew a lot of attention.

For many years, 4K images have been trade show “eye candy” for visitors, but at IBC 2012 Sony and SES showed that technology exists today to transmit high quality 4K images over satellite at a manageable 50mbit/s using h.264 compression technology.  The stunning live video images were delivered via an SES satellite to an 84-inch Sony Bravia 4K display.

The demo prompted speculation that 4K will be the “next HD” in terms of consumer adoption and broadcast infrastructure upgrades. Other observers took a more practical approach, saying that the industry might see 4K being used as a high-end production format in near to mid term, but that it will be a long time before broadcasters who have already spent millions on the transition to HDTV decide to upgrade again to 4K.

Indeed, when it comes to broadcast infrastructure upgrades it is operational efficiency, not higher resolution, which appears to be the primary demand of broadcasters. Thus, many vendors at IBC were promoting solutions designed to help broadcasters transition their operations to file-based and IT-oriented workflows. 

One of the ongoing initiatives in this area has been the development by a large number of vendors of integrated IT-based playout technologies, more commonly known as channel-in-a-box (CiaB).  These systems offer the promise of increased operational efficiency and significant cost savings through the integration of previously disparate playout and master control functionality into a single IT-based platform. Over the past several years, major vendors including Grass Valley, Miranda, Snell, Harmonic, and Evertz have offered products.

At IBC 2012, Harris became the latest entrant into the market with the launch of Versio, a CiaB system based on several of the company’s existing technology platforms including the Nexio server family, ADC automation, and Inscriber graphics. 

When describing the new Versio product at the company IBC press conference, Harris Morris said the No. 1 requirement for automated IT-based playout systems is reliability, and that this is an area where Harris Broadcast excels. Morris also emphasized that CiaB platforms rely heavily on automation technology, where Harris Broadcast is an established leader, making the company a natural choice for broadcasters considering integrated IT-based playout.

Although Harris Broadcast touted the fact that their Versio platform is based on the company’s existing technology platforms, it stopped well short of saying that the new system is a direct replacement for its current products, particularly its popular Nexio server family.

Instead the company described Versio as a robust cost-effective way for broadcasters to quickly add new services and digital subchannels channels, and to provide backup in emergencies.

“Channel-in-a-box should be about opening up new possibilities rather than limiting how a broadcaster can operate across multiple on-air scenarios,” said Andrew Warman, senior product manager at Harris Broadcast. “It’s limiting to look at channel-in-a-box as a system replacement for servers, automation, and other play-to-air systems. Broadcasters need freedom to build appropriate workflows for their operations, including external components.”

However, other vendors clearly see the CiaB market differently, and have taken a very different approach than Harris Broadcast, especially those firms that do not have an existing playout server business to protect. 

Snell Chief Architect Neil Maycock said that his company’s ICE platform is not only “ready for prime-time,” it is on the air today delivering high value content for major broadcasters.  Maycock also said that ICE has a unique architecture that enables it to scale from a single channel implementation, through a multi-location centralcasting model, to a large multi-channel playout environment.

PlayBox CEO Vassil Lefterov said he has built his entire business on disrupting the traditional server-based playout market. “We believe our singular focus on this application is a key advantage,” he said.  “Playbox has thousands of live channels on the air today and is working to re-define playout operations for many of our customers.”

Grass Valley, which like Harris has a significant video server business, took a more pragmatic approach.  SVP and CMO Graham Sharp said that “it’s likely CiaB and other IT-based playout systems may ultimately impact everyone’s server business, so we’ve taken the decision to cannibalize our own products where necessary by embracing IT technology, because if we don’t do it to ourselves someone else will.” 

Grass Valley was among the vendors with significant new products. Introductions included a new LDX camera platform that scales from a basic model to a high-end super-slow motion system; a new video server family, and brand new electronics for the Kayenne and Karrera production switchers.  Grass Valley said all its new products feature native 1080p processing, and provide straightforward upgrades via software.

Grass Valley also made bold claims about its future product plans, stating that by 2014 it will have replaced its entire portfolio with all new 1080p, IT-focused products. 

GV’s Sharp also hinted at a major NAB 2013 announcement from Grass Valley: “Next year we will introduce a completely new integrated IP-based platform that is totally format agnostic.” he said.  “We believe this new platform will enable a new way of working that we call non-linear production….”

All Grass Valley products, including those launched at IBC 2012, will be compatible with the new architecture, he said.

Sharp concluded GV press conference by saying: “If there is one take-away from this presentation about Grass Valley, it’s this: We’re back.”

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Evertz Beats Expectations in Q1 Fiscal 2013 as Profits Jump 41 Percent

Broadcast technology vendor financials, Quarterly Results | Posted by Joe Zaller
Sep 14 2012

Evertz announced that its revenue for the first quarter of its 2013 fiscal year was C$96m, an increase of 28% versus the same period a year ago, and up 26% versus the previous quarter.

Net earnings for the quarter were C$24.8m (C$0.34 per share), up 41% versus the same quarter last year, and up 87% versus the previous quarter.

The results for the quarter were well above the expectations of equity analysts, who on average were looking for revenue of C$84.9m and EPS of C$0.25.

Revenue in the US/Canada region was C$59.4, or 62% of total revenue, up 31% versus the same period a year ago, and up 62% versus the previous quarter.

International revenue was C$36.6m, an increase of 23% versus the same period last year, and down 8% versus the previous quarter. International sales were 38% of total revenue, down from 40% last year.

Evertz EVP Brian Campbell attributed the revenue growth to the ongoing transition to HD, a growing demand globally for high quality video, traction in the company’s workflow solutions from its purchase of Pharos, and several large projects that were recognized during the quarter.

The company had 76 orders in the quarter that were greater than C$200,000, and the top ten customers provided for 41% of revenue (C$39.4m), so Evertz clearly closed some big deals close during the quarter.

Significantly, one customer accounted for 15% of total revenue, or C$14.4m, during the quarter. C$14.4m is a huge order for any broadcast vendor, and this means that the company’s revenue during the quarter was significantly more concentrated than in the past.  For comparison, during the previous quarter no customer accounted for more than 5% of total revenue, or C$3.82m. In response to questions about the “15% customer” from Canacord Genuity analyst Robert Young, Brian Campbell pointed out that the 15% number relates to all product shipped to a single customer during the quarter, not necessarily a single order for one project.  Campbell also said that although this order was indeed large, the company has had large orders in the past.  What appears to make this order unusual is that it appears to have happened during a single quarter as opposed to delivery over multiple quarters, which Campbell said is more common.  Campbell declined to state who the customer was, or its geographic location, but given the rise in US/Canada sales, and the q/q decline in international revenue, it’s easy to speculate.

The strong results follow on from the previous quarter when Evertz announced that its order backlog had reached a record C$57m, and said that most of this backlog would ship during the current quarter. This appears to have happened, as the company’s order backlog at the end of the first quarter of its 2013 fiscal year was C$40m, or 30% lower than three months ago.

Gross margins in the quarter were 58%, up from 57% last year and up from 56% last quarter.  The company attributed its margin expansion in the quarter to higher revenue and traction in new product areas. Company CFO Anthony Gridley said that gross margins were within the company’s targeted range of 56% to 62%, and that the company is “comfortable” with that range.  Campbell added that this margin range allows Evertz to make money while remaining price-competitive in the market.

R&D expenses in the quarter were C$11.8m, an increase of 14% versus the same period last year, and down 8% versus the previous quarter when the company accelerated the purchase of materials and prototypes in order to take advantage of government tax incentives before the end of its fiscal year.  Gridley said the company is constantly adding R&D staff, so any reported decline in R&D spending is typically the result of an increase in prototypes in previous quarters.  Campbell said that the company will continue to invest in R&D as the company sees its engineering strength as a key market differentiator, and Evertz intends to “continue to extend this lead.”

SG&A expenses for the quarter were C$12.4m, an increase of 19% versus last year, and essentially flat with the previous quarter. Selling and administrative expenses represented approximately 13% of revenue in the quarter versus 14% of revenue during the same period last year, and 16% of revenue last quarter.

The company’s purchase order backlog at the end of August 2012 was in excess of C$40m, up 90% versus the same period last year, and down 30% versus the previous quarter.

Commenting on the recent IBC trade show, Campbell said that Evertz saw increasing awareness of some of its recent large R&D investments.  He specifically cited video transport, IT-based playout, asset management, and compressed domain products as areas where the company is seeing interest.

When asked by an analyst about the pick-up in broadcast technology M&A activity such as the recent purchase of Miranda by Belden, and the decision by Harris to divest its broadcast business, Campbell responded by saying that Grass Valley should be added to this list because it is also has been going through changes since being acquired by Francisco Partners.  Campbell implied that the distractions facing competitors was a net positive for Evertz.  “Customers look to Evertz as a very stable entity with very little disruption, so we’ve been able to capture market share” he said.

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Related Content:

Press Release: Evertz Technologies Reports Results for the First Quarter Ended July 31, 2012

Previous Quarter: Evertz Q4 FY 2012 Revenue Rises 11 Percent, Order Backlog at Record Level

Previous Year: Evertz Beats Expectations in Q1 2012 as Domestic Revenue Increases Six Percent

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Sales & Marketing Power Shift at “Profitable, Independent” Grass Valley

Uncategorized | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 20 2012

Grass Valley announced a reorganization of its sales and marketing leadership today, appointing three regional presidents and a chief marketing officer.

The company also slipped into the announcement the statement that it “is now a profitable independent company,” but did not provide any further details or financial metrics.

Grass Valley, which was acquired from Technicolor by private equity firm Francisco Partners in January 2011, says it has now completed the first phase of its corporate transformation by unifying its product line, modernizing its service offering, and improving supply chain management. The company says that the executive re-alignment signifies the next phase of its strategic plan, and will focus the company on better serving its customer base.

 

The following appointments were announced today.

 

  • Mike Oldham, who was the CEO of automation and channel-in-a-box provider OmniBus prior to its sale to Miranda in September 2010, has joined Grass Valley as region president, Americas

 

  • Alan Wright has been promoted to region president, EMEA

 

  • Andrew Sedek has been promoted to region president Asia Pacific

 

 

All four will report to Grass Valley president and CEO Alain Andreoli.

Grass Valley also said that longtime executive Jeff Rosica, the current EVP and chief sales & marketing officer, will leave the company near the end of the year.  Rosica, who ran Grass Valley when it was owned by Technicolor and oversaw the sale of Grass Valley to Francisco Partners, will serve as a strategic advisor to Andreoli until late November.

“Having re-aligned our product groups and streamlined our operations it’s now all about getting closer to our customers, becoming their trusted advisors and delighting them with the Grass Valley experience,” said Andreoli. “We are creating more strength in our regions and will now have three regional presidents reporting directly to me, as well as a newly created chief marketing officer role, bringing an even stronger voice of the customer to the executive team. Grass Valley is a strong global brand, with a balanced worldwide presence. We understand that customers in each region have unique needs and we want them to have a strong presence at the executive table.”

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Related Content:

Press Release: Grass Valley Re-Organizes its Sales and Marketing Organization

Press Release: Grass Valley Names Graham Sharp to Guide Corporate Development

Grass Valley Names New CEO, Management Team

Technicolor Completes Sale of Grass Valley

More Broadcast M&A – Miranda Buys OmniBus for C$48.7m

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© Devoncroft Partners.  All Rights Reserved.

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