Posts Tagged ‘broadcast workflow’

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, Quarterly Results | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 03 2013

This is the fourth in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 

Previous articles about the 2013 BBS discussed the most important broadcast industry trends, how the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends have changed over time, and where money is currently being spent in the broadcast industry.

This article expands on the findings of the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index by drilling down into the specific product categories that are being evaluated for purchase this year by our global sample of nearly 10,000 broadcast technology end-users in 100+ countries.

We presented research participant with a list of relevant product categories and asked to indicate which ones they are currently evaluating for purchase.

The results are shown in the chart below.

 

2013 BBS -- Product Being Evaluated for Purchase

 

In 2013 it is likely that production technology – such as video editing systems, camera-related products, and audio technology – will be in demand as broadcast professionals continue to upgrade their facilities to HDTV operations.

The new studios, OB vans, and channels that broadcasters have planned and budgeted for will drive the evaluation and purchase of a wide variety of equipment including studio cameras, production switchers, multiviewers, automation, storage, and transmission encoders. As always, test & measurement products will be required for these new facilities.

Strong interest in multi-platform content delivery is driving interest in products and services such as ingest/ streaming/ transcoding and online video delivery platforms.

The ongoing transition to file-based/tapeless workflows will drive the evaluation and purchase of products such as near-line/off-line/archival storage, production servers, and playout automation.

All of the above will likely benefit software-oriented systems such as workflow / asset management, library/storage management, and broadcast business management systems. These products help broadcast technology increase their operational efficiency by facilitating content storage & search; linear and multi-platform playout & distribution; and of course monetization.

 

The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

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Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 01 2013

This is the third in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 

In a previous article, we published the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which shows how a global sample of nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals ranked a set of broadcast industry trends in terms of the commercial importance of each one to their business.

This was followed by a post called Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013, which examined how the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends have changed over time.

Rather than looking at industry trends, which are often an indicator of what might happen in the future, this article examines what technology products and services are actually being purchased today by broadcasters and media companies globally.

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The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index (which can be found here) showed that the top-ranked broadcast industry trend in 2013 is “multi-platform content delivery.”  Other important trends include “file-based workflows,” “IP networking and content delivery,” and the “transition to HDTV operations.”

The 2013 BBS Trend Index includes a mix of current and future commercial priorities, some of which have already been widely deployed, on a wide scale, some of which are currently being trialed, and others which have not yet been widely implemented. Industry trends evolve and change over time, so tracking this evolution is helpful to better understand what customers are discussing and thinking about implementing in the future.

However, a top ranking in an industry trend Index does not necessarily translate into where broadcast technology buyers are actually spending their budgets in 2013 and 2014. Therefore, it’s important to make a clear distinction between what broadcast customers are thinking and talking about doing in the future (trends), and where they are spending their technology budgets today (projects).

Technology spending in the broadcast industry is typically project-based. Real (budgeted) projects are where broadcast technology budgets are being spent today, not just what people are talking about doing in the future.

Capital projects come in many forms.  They might include international elections, sporting championships, new services designed to attract incremental revenue, and the long-term planned capital upgrades of broadcast infrastructure and facilities.

In order to better understand this dynamic, we presented 2013 BBS participants with a list of 18 projects (determined based on feedback of BBS stakeholders), and asked them to indicate which of these projects they are currently in the process of implementing or have budgeted to implement within the next year.

Unlike industry trend data, which highlights what respondents are thinking/talking about doing in the future, this information provides direct feedback about what major capital projects are being implemented by broadcast technology end-users around the world, and provides useful insight into the capital expenditure plans of the industry.

Taken together, information about trends and projects collected in the 2013 BBS can be used to understand the difference between “trend and spend,” and/or hype and reality.

 

The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index, shown below, measures the number of projects that research participants are currently implementing or have budgeted to implement.

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

 

Comparing the above chart with the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index illustrates the difference between what end-users are thinking and talking about (trends), and where they are actually planning to spend their budgets today (projects).

While “multi-platform content delivery” was this year’s top-ranked trend, when it comes to where money is actually being spent in 2013, more broadcast technology buyers said that they have budgeted for “upgrading infrastructure for HD/ 3Gbps operations” than any other project.

This finding is consistent with our previous research. Upgrading infrastructure for HD / 3Gbps operations has consistently been the top driver of broadcast technology spending for the past several years, and this is once again the case in 2013.

This year’s top project correlates directly with “transition to HDTV operations,” which was ranked #4 in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index.

The projects ranked #3, #4, #5, #7, #9, and #12 in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index – “upgrading cameras,” “upgrading transmission & distribution capabilities;” “building new studios / OB vans;” “launching new channels;” and “upgrading newsroom operations” – are also related to the transition to HDTV operations. These new cameras, transmission upgrades, new studios, new channels, and upgraded news environments will almost certainly be at least HD capable, if not fully HD.

In some cases, industry trends and budgeted projects line up nicely. In others however, there are significant differences.

A good example of the latter is “multi-platform content delivery,” which has been the top-ranked trend in the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index since 2010, and dominated the Index this year.  However, the corresponding project measured in the chart above, “distribute and monetize content on multiple distribution platforms,” ranked #10 out of 18 in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index, significantly below items ranked much lower in the BBS Trend Index.

These findings are consistent with previous BBS studies, as well as our other research in the professional broadcast technology marketplace.

Despite strong interest in multi-platform content delivery, it appears that creating a sustainable (and profitable) business model for distributing and monetizing content on multiple digital distribution platforms has proven elusive to date for both end-users and technology vendors.

We have conducted numerous projects about multi-platform business models that involved interviewing senior executives from broadcasters and media companies. Although these executives immediately agree that getting to “multi-platform nirvana” is strategically important to their organizations, many readily admit that they have yet to find the right business model.

Many broadcasters and content owners believe that in order to achieve increased revenue and profitability in a multi-platform world, they must first dramatically increase their efficiency through the implementation of new workflows and technical systems, some of which do not yet exist.

This implies that there are likely to be significant opportunities in the future for broadcast technology vendors that are able to solve the technical, operational, and business challenges facing end-users who see multi-platform distribution and monetization as a critical part of their business strategy.

It also helps explain why “file-based/tapeless workflows” was ranked #2 in the 2013 BBS Trend Index, with many research participants saying it is the industry trend that is most important commercially to their businesses over the next few years.

Indeed, a number of capital projects are being implemented in 2013-14 are directly related to “file-based/tapeless workflows” trend. Examples of this are “cloud technology/cloud services,” “workflow / asset-management,” “archive-related projects,’ and “automating workflows.”

In particular, the #2 ranked project in 2013 — “install or enhance workflow / asset management system” – is an area where there has been a great deal of recent activity. Although it may seem that MAM has been set to become “the next big thing” for the past decade or so, it now appears that broadcasters are increasingly focusing on MAM deployments.

One reason for this could be that many end-users believe that in order to be profitable in a multi-platform world, they must significantly increase the efficiency of their operations, and broader use of MAM is seen as one part of solution.

Indeed, in a recent Devoncroft project, more than half of the senior executives from broadcasters and media companies we interviewed cited multi-platform content distribution as the factor that will drive the most change in their organizations over the next few years; and because of this, more than two-thirds predicted their spending on MAM and workflow tools will increase over the next two years.

The remainder of the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index offers a mixed picture of project activity across the world, and includes everything from upgrading audio and newsrooms to migrating infrastructure from copper to fiber.

And as seen in the 2013 BBS Trend Index, some projects are being planned as the direct result of government or corporate mandates. “Prepare for analog switch-off” is the best example of this.  In the territories where governments have mandated a switch to digital broadcasting, tremendous planning and focus is being devoted to these projects, resulting in strong revenue for transmission and distribution-related products and services.

Interestingly, despite the fact that they may have the potential to deliver increased efficiencies and new revenue streams, some very large projects appear towards the bottom of this list. For example, “consolidate operations in regional hubs (centralcasting),” and “outsourced operations (playout),” are the bottom ranked projects in 2013. This is because although these are high value projects, they will be undertaken by a relatively small number of organizations — i.e. large broadcasters.  This highlights that the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index is a graphic representation of the number of all planned projects across all respondents, regardless of organization type, size, or location.  It does not measure size, value, or relative commercial importance of planned projects.  Please keep this in mind when reading this information and interpreting these findings.

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The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

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Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

Previous Year: The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

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© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

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Two Investment Banks Offer Post-NAB Thoughts, Insight on Broadcast Industry

broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast technology vendor financials | Posted by Joe Zaller
May 18 2010

Two boutique investment banks, Silverwood Partners and Pharus Advisors have recently published notes to clients detailing their impressions of the NAB 2010 show.  Both companies gave me permission to re-publish them here.

 

Silverwood has been involved in a number of broadcast M&A deals including Blackmagic / DaVinci and Avid / Euphonix. Prior to the 2010 NAB show the company published a 40 page report about the broadcast industry for their investment banking clients, which is worth reading to get their full perspective on the broadcast market.  

Pharus has also been involved in a number of industry transactions including Neural Audio / DTS and Virgin Media / Two Way Media. The company published their post-NAB thoughts in their industry newsletter, which also includes a summary of recent M&A transactions in the digital media space, and a comparison of publicly traded companies.

 

 

Silverwood NAB Perspectives:

Revenue Flow versus Work Flow.  Broadcast and media customers are principally focused on sustaining advertising revenue from traditional outlets and driving incremental revenue over emerging outlets. The focus over recent years on cost containment through automation and technology efficiencies has been eclipsed by the need to adapt technology infrastructure to a changing business model.  The Newspaper industry provides an instructive lesson on the need to be responsive to external challenges to traditional business norms.  Technology vendors are faced with customers that have shifting purchasing priorities and that are scrutinizing expenditures on conventional broadcast infrastructure.

 

3D will not Reverse Industry Revenue Decline.  While 3D may drive some additional short term revenue, widespread adoption is still in question because certain content will never lend itself to the 3D medium.  Furthermore, with the exception of large screen environments showing purpose produced content (Avatar, Alice in Wonderland), the current 3D experience requires additional improvement.  There are no clear standards for end user devices (TVs and glasses) so mass end-consumer device adoption – if it is to occur – will take time.  Consider that the ongoing HD transition began with the first HDTV broadcast in 1998 and is still only 40% complete in the US market.  Lastly, production methods themselves must also adapt to the creation of 3D content – there is no consistency in the content acquisition process, much of which is based on trial and error and research.  3D requires a new approach in the creative production process as fast switching and cuts can prove to be nauseating to the viewer.  There are also concerns that poorly produced 3D will lead to negative customer perceptions in the near term which will slow adoption and the long term success of the medium.

 

Pricing is Collapsing.  Years of substantial profitability for media and broadcast customers masked poor cost discipline in the sourcing of technology.   Recent weakness in the advertising market and the broader economic disruption has caused customers to focus on capital budgets and look for more cost effective solutions.  Compounding this challenge, inexpensive general purpose IT infrastructure continues to replace purpose built hardware solutions, creating good enough solutions at attractive prices for many use cases.  This is putting pressure on margins for many traditional Broadcast technology vendors who organized their cost structures for the high price, ‘boom’ years and cannot adapt quickly enough to the changed industry circumstances.

 

Value Separation: Software, Hardware, Connectivity.  Historically, broadcast and post-production customers purchased purpose built solutions where the discrete software, hardware and connectivity components were blended within a hardware solution.  As the hardware portion becomes increasingly standardized, vendors will need to focus on defensible segments of the value chain, particularly within the software layer.  In many cases specialized hardware vendors are effectively software companies burdened with a legacy hardware orientation.  It is expected that vendors will need transformative change rather than evolutionary adaptation to address the fundamental changes in the media technology industry. 

 

Growing Software Opportunity.  It is expected that software companies will continue to be a growing presence in the media technology industry.  Differentiation from IT solutions for incumbent vendors resides in the software layer.  Well-positioned companies have software solutions that extend and leverage basic IT functionality, which will continue to improve in speed and capability.  From a product perspective, technology vendors should examine their product portfolios to identify and extract the unique software functionality that is truly differentiating their offerings.  In addition, the increasing use of standardized IT platform technology is creating a growing market for software vendors that can use the standardization to scale efficiently. 

 

Commercial Opportunity: Customer Diversification.  Well-positioned companies are diversifying and selling to a broader customer base, particularly customers outside the traditional broadcast market.   Targeting other industry verticals is not feasible with a customized hardware solution and an industry focused direct sales model.  In contrast, software solutions that extend standardized hardware and that are deployed through VARs and channel partners can be more easily adapted to large, adjacent industry verticals (Medical, Military, Enterprise).

 

Business Model Disruption.   For NAB exhibitors there remains fundamental weakness in the traditional broadcast technology industry.  The reduction in industry revenues will highlight one of the principal difficulties for many NAB exhibitors: sales and marketing expense is too high for revenue levels.  With pricing pressure, many vendors will need to change to a distribution model or become part of a larger solution that can support the fixed sales expense.   Well-positioned, well-capitalized vendors will have a unique opportunity to acquire established, respected brands with large user bases over the coming year.

 

Service Opportunity – Revenue Flow.  Broadcasters and media companies are faced with a proliferation of technologies and monetization possibilities, and an accelerating rate of technology change.  Historically, broadcasting challenges were solved by buying incremental technologies to plug into an existing well-understood technology infrastructure.  Current business challenges require business model innovation coupled with technology platform innovation to drive revenues across a growing range of end-point devices and outlets.  Given the lack of clarity on the optimal revenue model and the rapid pace of technology change, broadcasters and media customers are reluctant to invest in standalone technology purchases.  This is creating an attractive service opportunity driven by the ability to provide incremental revenue growth with a low barrier to entry, a receptive customer and an attractive ROI.

 

 

 

 

PHARUS ADVISORS

PUBLIC MARKET AND M&A UPDATE ON MEDIA AND BROADCAST TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY

NAB OVERVIEW

We recently attended the NAB 2010 conference in Las Vegas. We came out of the conference feeling the media and broadcast technology market is experiencing a healthy recovery from 2009. The recurring comment echoed by many industry players was that the deals in the customer pipeline that were stalled in 2009 are now morphing into real opportunities. The RFP activity is showing decent improvement, however, the sales‐cycle continues to be long and spending not completely flowing.

Even though the network spending in North America, which was driven by conversion to HDTV over last few years, is slowing, other factors like changes in customer preferences, and pressure to generate new sources of revenues and reduce costs are expected to continue to drive technology capital expenditure for networks. These new developments are adding new dynamism to the sector, which can be witnessed by the plethora of vendors and solutions.

Here are some of prominent themes that we witnessed at the NAB show this year.

  • Emergence of 3D television broadcasting: As expected, this was the major theme at NAB similar to what was the case at CES earlier this year. TV manufacturers continue to be enthusiastic about this trend. CES expects 4.3 million 3D TV sets to be sold in 2010, with about 25% of total TVs sold in 2013 to be 3D‐enabled. Even though some major players (like DIRECTV, Discovery, IMAX, and etc.) have made announcements over last few months about launching 3D content, a lot of the content producers and broadcasters are still not sure about how quickly this market opportunity will grow in the near term. As a result, they tend to be reticent to make investment in this area at this point.

 

  • Development of multi‐platform content distribution (broadcast, web and mobile) capability: The spending on TV advertising is gradually declining. According to Yankee Group, the TV ad market declined 21.2%, from $52 billion to $41 billion, between 2008 and 2009. During this same period spending on Internet advertising grew as a result of consumers spending more time online and less time watching TV. With more and more eyeballs consuming video content on Web and mobile devices, broadcasters are investing in technologies which enable delivery of content over multitude of platforms.

 

  • Adoption of file‐based workflows: One of the important areas of investment for broadcasters remains implementation of file‐based workflow infrastructure. This is viewed as important by broadcasters to augment flexibility in day‐to‐day operations, facilitate reduction in operational costs, and enable efficient multi‐platform content distribution.

 

Emergence of Over‐the‐Top (OTT) Video and convergence of TV and Internet: The other recurring trend at the show was the focus on growing convergence between broadcast TV and Web video. Internet users are increasingly interested in streaming full length video directly onto their TVs and as a result variety of models are appearing to provide consumers with this capability. According to report by Tender Research from October 2009, about 7% of households will forgo Pay TV subscriptions by 2012 in favor of OTT services and free over‐the‐air television. OTT market is moving very fast with proliferation of enabling devices like Roku, Xbox, and a range of new HDTV models and growth of online video sites such as Hulu, Netflix,

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