Posts Tagged ‘broadcast archive’

2015 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) Reports Now Available

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 04 2015

The 2015 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) Reports have now been published and are available from Devoncroft Partners.

We have been publishing the BBS Reports since 2009.  Each new edition is created through several months of research, including interviews with technology end-users, global surveys of technology decision makers, analysis of the end-user responses, and visualization of the data collected.  Now in its seventh year of publication, the BBS remains the most comprehensive annual study of technology end-users in the global broadcast and media technology industry.  Nearly 10,000 technology professionals in 100+ countries participated in the 2015 BBS, making it once again the largest market study of the media technology industry.

Based on feedback from technology vendors, media companies, and investors, we have updated the vendors, product categories, and market trends profiled in the 2015 BBS to better align with recent market developments.

These updates help ensure the BBS reports remains a critical reference for industry executives to improve strategic decision-making, customer engagement, marketing strategy, product planning, and sales execution.  In addition to technology vendor and service provider strategic planning, BBS reports are also used frequently for M&A and investment activities by both buyers and sellers.

Three types of 2015 BBS reports are available:

  • 2015 BBS Global Brand Reports: provides deep insight into how each more than 100 broadcast technology suppliers (see full list below) are perceived by market participants, along with comprehensive benchmarking of broadcast technology vendors on a wide variety of metrics

 

  • 2015 BBS Product Reports: provide detailed information from buyers, specifiers, and users of broadcast technology products in 30 separate categories (see full list below)

 

  • 2015 BBS Global Market Report: provides detailed information about industry trends, major projects being planned, products being evaluated for purchase, current and future plant infrastructure, broadcast technology budgets, and planned deployment of new technologies including 4K, HEVC compression, and IP-based technology infrastructure

 

For additional information on the 2015 BBS report, please email us.

As is Devoncroft’s custom, we will publish selected highlights from this year’s BBS reports on the Devoncroft website.  These articles are posted on a semi-regular basis, so please check back often.

To receive posts when published, please enter register with your email in the box in the upper right-hand corner of the page.

The tables below list the  technology vendor brands and product categories covered in the 2015 BBS.

 

All Brands Covered in 2015 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS)


Product Categories Covered in the 2015 Big Broadcast Survey

Technology Products & Vendor Brands Covered in the 2015 BBS, by Application Area

 

Acquisition & Production:

Camera Lenses

Angenieux, Canon, Fujinon

 

ENG Cameras

Canon, Hitachi, Ikegami, JVC, Panasonic, Sony

 

Large Format Single Sensor Cameras

ARRI, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Red Digital Cinema, Sony

 

Production Switchers

Blackmagic Design, Broadcast Pix, For-A, Grass Valley, NewTek, Panasonic, Ross Video, Snell, Sony

 

Studio/System Cameras

Grass Valley, Hitachi, Ikegami, JVC, Panasonic, Sony

 

 

Post Production:

 

Graphics & Branding

Adobe, Autodesk, Avid, ChyronHego, Evertz, Grass Valley, Imagine Communications, Orad, Pixel Power, Ross Video, Vizrt

 

Transcoding / Streaming

Dalet/AmberFin, Elemental Technologies, Envivio, Harmonic, Imagine Communications, Telestream

 

Video Editing

Adobe, Apple, Avid, EVS, Grass Valley, Imagine Communications, Sony

 

Infrastructure:

Bonded Cellular

Dejero, LiveU, Teradek, TVU, Vislink

 

Routing Switchers

Blackmagic Design, Evertz, Grass Valley, Imagine Communications, Nevion, Pesa, Ross Video, Snell, Utah Scientific

 

Signal Processing / Interfacing / Modular

Aja Video, Axon, Blackmagic Design, Evertz, For-A, Grass Valley, Imagine Communication, Ross Video, Snell

 

Video Transport

Arris, Aspera, Cisco, Ericsson, Evertz, Harmonic, Imagine Communications, Media Links, Net Insight, Nevion, Riedel, Signiant

 

 

Audio:

Audio Consoles

Avid, Calrec, Lawo, Salzbrenner Stagetec, Solid State Logic (SSL), Soundcraft, Studer, Wheatstone, Yamaha

 

Audio Processing & Monitoring

Adobe, Avid, Dolby, Linear Acoustic, RTW, TSL, Wohler

 

Intercom / Talkback

Clear-Com, Riedel, RTS Intercom Systems, Trilogy

 

Microphones

AKG, Audio-Technica, beyerdynamic, Electro Voice, Marshall Electronics, Neumann, Schoeps, Sennheiser, Shure, Sony

 

Monitors (speakers)

Adam, Avid, Focal, Genelec, JBL, KRK Systems, Mackie, Neumann, PMC,

 

 

Storage:

High Performance Shared Storage:

Avid, Harmonic, HP, IBM, Isilon Systems/EMC, NetApp, Quantum

 

Playout / Transmission Servers

Avid, EVS, Grass Valley, Harmonic, Imagine Communications, Ross Video

 

Production Servers

Avid, EVS, Grass Valley, Harmonic, Quantel

 

 

System Automation and Control:

Broadcast Business Management Systems

arvato/S4M, Imagine Communications, MediageniX, MSA Focus, SintecMedia/Pilat Media, VSN, Wide Orbit

 

Archive & Archive Management

ASG/Atempo, Masstech, Oracle/Front Porch Digital, Quantum, SGL, XenData

 

Playout Automation

Grass Valley, Imagine Communications, Pebble Beach, Playbox, Snell

 

Workflow / Asset Management

arvato/S4M, Avid, Dalet/Amberfin, EVS, Imagine Communications, Sony, Vizrt, VSN

 

 

Playout and Delivery:

Integrated Playout (Channel in a Box)

Evertz, Grass Valley, Harmonic, Imagine Communications, Pebble Beach, Playbox, Snell, Thomson Video Networks

 

On-line / Streaming Video Delivery Platforms

Brightcove, Kaltura, Ooyala, Piksel

 

Transmission Encoders

Arris, ATEME, Cisco, Elemental Technologies, Envivio, Ericsson, Harmonic, Imagine Communications, Thomson Video Networks

 

Transmitters

GatesAir, Hitachi, NEC, Plisch, Rohde & Schwarz, Screen Service, Toshiba

 

 

Test, Quality Control and Monitoring:

 

Multiviewers

Avitech, Axon, Evertz, For-A, Grass Valley, Imagine Communications

 

Test & Measurement

Imagine Communications, IneoQuest, Leader, Phabrix, Rohde & Schwarz, Tektronix

.

.

 

© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2015. All Rights Reserved.

.

.

 

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Oracle to Acquire Front Porch Digital

Broadcast Vendor M&A | Posted by Joe Zaller
Sep 14 2014

Oracle announced that it has signed an agreement to acquire library and archive management provider Front Porch Digital.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

According to Oracle, Front Porch Digital’s management team and employees are expected to join Oracle and continue in their current capacity

On the face of it, this is a deal that makes sense. Thanks to the widespread use of digital acquisition technology, the industry has seen huge growth in the amount of digital content being created, with shooting ratios expanding to up to 200:1 At the same time content owners are increasingly looking to find additional value in their media assets, and must find a way to efficiently manage and monetize them, either on-premise or in the cloud.

Oracle’s media and entertainment storage platforms come primarily through the its acquisition of Sun Microsystems in 2010.  Sun had previously acquired LTO library provider StorageTek.  After acquiring Sun, Oracle put renewed emphasis on its media storage products, just as digital content creation exploded, and archive management became an increasingly important requirement.

By combining Oracle’s disk-based and LTO storage platforms, with FPD’s storage management solutions, Oracle now has the capability to sell both the storage hardware and the crucial software management layer that supports it, and do so at scale.

 

Oracle buys FPD -- benefits of combination

 

Oracle says the acquisition of Front Porch Digital “will create a comprehensive, high-performance cloud or on-premise digital content storage management solution that empowers customers to modernize and simplify content management, increase efficiencies, optimize resources, and increase their bottom line.

Of course this combination also raises competitive issues, since Front Porch Digital’s partner ecosystem includes a wide variety of other storage vendors, who may in future shy away from working with a management platform owned by a competitor.

To counter this issue, Oracle says it “is committed to maintaining Front Porch Digital’s open integration platform with third-party systems and applications, and plans to further augment Front Porch Digital solutions with Oracle technologies to deliver enhanced features and functionalities.”

“Organizations need a modern, integrated content storage management solution to manage and monetize their valuable rich media assets,” said John Fowler, Executive Vice President of Oracle Systems. “We will continue to build on Front Porch Digital’s success and unique capabilities, which complement Oracle’s existing high performance and scalable engineered storage solutions.”

“Front Porch Digital has developed industry leading solutions that help companies manage large-scale digital content,” said Mike Knaisch, CEO, Front Porch Digital. “We are thrilled to be joining Oracle to continue our long-standing partnership. This combination will enable us to better serve and support our customers at a global scale.”

The proposed transaction is subject to customary closing conditions. Until the transaction closes, each company will continue to operate independently, and it is business as usual.

.

.

 

Related Content:

Press Release: Oracle Buys Front Porch Digital

Oracle Acquires Front Porch Digital — General Presentation

Oracle Buys Front Porch Digital — FAQ

Customer and Partner Letter | Oracle and Front Porch Digital

.

.

© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014.  All Rights Reserved.

.

.

2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) Reports Now Available

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, market research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 15 2014

After months of data collection, analysis, and visualization, we have now completed work on the 2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS). Reports from this study have now been published and are available from Devoncroft Partners.

If you’re not familiar with the BBS, it’s the most comprehensive annual study of technology end-users in the global broadcast industry. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries participated in the 2014 BBS, making it once again the largest market study of the broadcast industry.

BBS reports have been designed to help readers improve their strategic decision-making, customer engagement, marketing strategy, product planning, and sales execution.  BBS reports are also used frequently for M&A-related activities by both buyers and sellers.

.

Three types of 2014 BBS reports are available:

  • 2014 BBS Global Brand Reports:  provides deep insight into how each more than 100 broadcast technology suppliers (see full list below) are perceived by market participants, along with comprehensive benchmarking of broadcast technology vendors on a wide variety of metrics.

 

  • 2014 BBS Product Reports:  provide detailed information from buyers, specifiers, and users of broadcast technology products in 31 separate categories (see full list below)

 

  • 2014 BBS Global Market Report: provides detailed information about industry trends, major projects being planned, products being evaluated for purchase, current and future plant infrastructure, broadcast technology CapEx budgets, and planned deployment of new technologies including 4K, Connected TV, and Social TV.

.

 

If you would like information about these reports and how they can help your business, please get in touch.

 

In addition to these paid-for reports, we will also be publishing highlights from the 2014 BBS on the Devoncroft website.  These articles will be posted on a semi-regular basis, so please check back often.

To receive posts when they are published, just enter your email in the box in the upper right-hand corner of the page.

 

The tables below show the product categories and broadcast technology vendor brands covered in the 2014 BBS.

 

 Product Categories Covered in the 2014 BBS:

2014 BBS -- Product Categories Covered in the 2014 Big Broadcast Survey

 

 

Broadcast Technology Brands Covered in the 2014 BBS:

 

2014 BBS -- All Brands included in 2014 BBS

.

.© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

.

 

.

 

 

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, Quarterly Results | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 03 2013

This is the fourth in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 

Previous articles about the 2013 BBS discussed the most important broadcast industry trends, how the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends have changed over time, and where money is currently being spent in the broadcast industry.

This article expands on the findings of the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index by drilling down into the specific product categories that are being evaluated for purchase this year by our global sample of nearly 10,000 broadcast technology end-users in 100+ countries.

We presented research participant with a list of relevant product categories and asked to indicate which ones they are currently evaluating for purchase.

The results are shown in the chart below.

 

2013 BBS -- Product Being Evaluated for Purchase

 

In 2013 it is likely that production technology – such as video editing systems, camera-related products, and audio technology – will be in demand as broadcast professionals continue to upgrade their facilities to HDTV operations.

The new studios, OB vans, and channels that broadcasters have planned and budgeted for will drive the evaluation and purchase of a wide variety of equipment including studio cameras, production switchers, multiviewers, automation, storage, and transmission encoders. As always, test & measurement products will be required for these new facilities.

Strong interest in multi-platform content delivery is driving interest in products and services such as ingest/ streaming/ transcoding and online video delivery platforms.

The ongoing transition to file-based/tapeless workflows will drive the evaluation and purchase of products such as near-line/off-line/archival storage, production servers, and playout automation.

All of the above will likely benefit software-oriented systems such as workflow / asset management, library/storage management, and broadcast business management systems. These products help broadcast technology increase their operational efficiency by facilitating content storage & search; linear and multi-platform playout & distribution; and of course monetization.

 

The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

.

.

Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

.

.

© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

.

.

 

 

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 01 2013

This is the third in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 

In a previous article, we published the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which shows how a global sample of nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals ranked a set of broadcast industry trends in terms of the commercial importance of each one to their business.

This was followed by a post called Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013, which examined how the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends have changed over time.

Rather than looking at industry trends, which are often an indicator of what might happen in the future, this article examines what technology products and services are actually being purchased today by broadcasters and media companies globally.

.

 

The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index (which can be found here) showed that the top-ranked broadcast industry trend in 2013 is “multi-platform content delivery.”  Other important trends include “file-based workflows,” “IP networking and content delivery,” and the “transition to HDTV operations.”

The 2013 BBS Trend Index includes a mix of current and future commercial priorities, some of which have already been widely deployed, on a wide scale, some of which are currently being trialed, and others which have not yet been widely implemented. Industry trends evolve and change over time, so tracking this evolution is helpful to better understand what customers are discussing and thinking about implementing in the future.

However, a top ranking in an industry trend Index does not necessarily translate into where broadcast technology buyers are actually spending their budgets in 2013 and 2014. Therefore, it’s important to make a clear distinction between what broadcast customers are thinking and talking about doing in the future (trends), and where they are spending their technology budgets today (projects).

Technology spending in the broadcast industry is typically project-based. Real (budgeted) projects are where broadcast technology budgets are being spent today, not just what people are talking about doing in the future.

Capital projects come in many forms.  They might include international elections, sporting championships, new services designed to attract incremental revenue, and the long-term planned capital upgrades of broadcast infrastructure and facilities.

In order to better understand this dynamic, we presented 2013 BBS participants with a list of 18 projects (determined based on feedback of BBS stakeholders), and asked them to indicate which of these projects they are currently in the process of implementing or have budgeted to implement within the next year.

Unlike industry trend data, which highlights what respondents are thinking/talking about doing in the future, this information provides direct feedback about what major capital projects are being implemented by broadcast technology end-users around the world, and provides useful insight into the capital expenditure plans of the industry.

Taken together, information about trends and projects collected in the 2013 BBS can be used to understand the difference between “trend and spend,” and/or hype and reality.

 

The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index, shown below, measures the number of projects that research participants are currently implementing or have budgeted to implement.

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

 

Comparing the above chart with the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index illustrates the difference between what end-users are thinking and talking about (trends), and where they are actually planning to spend their budgets today (projects).

While “multi-platform content delivery” was this year’s top-ranked trend, when it comes to where money is actually being spent in 2013, more broadcast technology buyers said that they have budgeted for “upgrading infrastructure for HD/ 3Gbps operations” than any other project.

This finding is consistent with our previous research. Upgrading infrastructure for HD / 3Gbps operations has consistently been the top driver of broadcast technology spending for the past several years, and this is once again the case in 2013.

This year’s top project correlates directly with “transition to HDTV operations,” which was ranked #4 in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index.

The projects ranked #3, #4, #5, #7, #9, and #12 in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index – “upgrading cameras,” “upgrading transmission & distribution capabilities;” “building new studios / OB vans;” “launching new channels;” and “upgrading newsroom operations” – are also related to the transition to HDTV operations. These new cameras, transmission upgrades, new studios, new channels, and upgraded news environments will almost certainly be at least HD capable, if not fully HD.

In some cases, industry trends and budgeted projects line up nicely. In others however, there are significant differences.

A good example of the latter is “multi-platform content delivery,” which has been the top-ranked trend in the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index since 2010, and dominated the Index this year.  However, the corresponding project measured in the chart above, “distribute and monetize content on multiple distribution platforms,” ranked #10 out of 18 in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index, significantly below items ranked much lower in the BBS Trend Index.

These findings are consistent with previous BBS studies, as well as our other research in the professional broadcast technology marketplace.

Despite strong interest in multi-platform content delivery, it appears that creating a sustainable (and profitable) business model for distributing and monetizing content on multiple digital distribution platforms has proven elusive to date for both end-users and technology vendors.

We have conducted numerous projects about multi-platform business models that involved interviewing senior executives from broadcasters and media companies. Although these executives immediately agree that getting to “multi-platform nirvana” is strategically important to their organizations, many readily admit that they have yet to find the right business model.

Many broadcasters and content owners believe that in order to achieve increased revenue and profitability in a multi-platform world, they must first dramatically increase their efficiency through the implementation of new workflows and technical systems, some of which do not yet exist.

This implies that there are likely to be significant opportunities in the future for broadcast technology vendors that are able to solve the technical, operational, and business challenges facing end-users who see multi-platform distribution and monetization as a critical part of their business strategy.

It also helps explain why “file-based/tapeless workflows” was ranked #2 in the 2013 BBS Trend Index, with many research participants saying it is the industry trend that is most important commercially to their businesses over the next few years.

Indeed, a number of capital projects are being implemented in 2013-14 are directly related to “file-based/tapeless workflows” trend. Examples of this are “cloud technology/cloud services,” “workflow / asset-management,” “archive-related projects,’ and “automating workflows.”

In particular, the #2 ranked project in 2013 — “install or enhance workflow / asset management system” – is an area where there has been a great deal of recent activity. Although it may seem that MAM has been set to become “the next big thing” for the past decade or so, it now appears that broadcasters are increasingly focusing on MAM deployments.

One reason for this could be that many end-users believe that in order to be profitable in a multi-platform world, they must significantly increase the efficiency of their operations, and broader use of MAM is seen as one part of solution.

Indeed, in a recent Devoncroft project, more than half of the senior executives from broadcasters and media companies we interviewed cited multi-platform content distribution as the factor that will drive the most change in their organizations over the next few years; and because of this, more than two-thirds predicted their spending on MAM and workflow tools will increase over the next two years.

The remainder of the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index offers a mixed picture of project activity across the world, and includes everything from upgrading audio and newsrooms to migrating infrastructure from copper to fiber.

And as seen in the 2013 BBS Trend Index, some projects are being planned as the direct result of government or corporate mandates. “Prepare for analog switch-off” is the best example of this.  In the territories where governments have mandated a switch to digital broadcasting, tremendous planning and focus is being devoted to these projects, resulting in strong revenue for transmission and distribution-related products and services.

Interestingly, despite the fact that they may have the potential to deliver increased efficiencies and new revenue streams, some very large projects appear towards the bottom of this list. For example, “consolidate operations in regional hubs (centralcasting),” and “outsourced operations (playout),” are the bottom ranked projects in 2013. This is because although these are high value projects, they will be undertaken by a relatively small number of organizations — i.e. large broadcasters.  This highlights that the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index is a graphic representation of the number of all planned projects across all respondents, regardless of organization type, size, or location.  It does not measure size, value, or relative commercial importance of planned projects.  Please keep this in mind when reading this information and interpreting these findings.

.

The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

.

.

Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

Previous Year: The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

.

.

© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

.

.

 

 

Analyzing Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, technology trends | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 08 2012

This is the third in a series of articles about some of the findings from the 2012 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2012 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

 

In a previous post, I discussed The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which shows which industry trends are most commercially important to the global sample of 2012 BBS respondents. 

Like any list of trends, this list includes a mix of current and future commercial priorities, some of which are being done today on a wide scale, some of which are in a trial phase, and others which have not yet been widely implemented.

By a wide margin, the top trend in the 2012 Trend Index is “multi-platform content delivery.”  Other important trends include the transition to file-based workflows, the transition to HDTV operations, and IP networking and content delivery.

Tracking broadcast industry trends and their evolution is useful because this shows what customers are discussing and thinking about implementing in the future.  However, a high ranking in an industry trend Index does not necessarily mean that this is where customers are spending their technology budgets in 2012 and 2013. 

Thus, it’s important to make a clear distinction between what broadcast customers are thinking and talking about in the future (industry trends), and where they are spending their technology budgets today.

Technology spending in the broadcast industry tends to be project-based. Projects might include international elections and sporting championships, to the long-term, planned capital upgrades of broadcast infrastructure and facilities.  Thus, an understanding of the major projects being implemented by broadcaster professionals around the world provides useful insight into the capital expenditure plans of the industry.

Projects represent where broadcast technology budgets are being spent today, not just what people are talking about doing in the future. 

In order to better understand this dynamic, were presented broadcast professionals with a list of major projects and asked them to indicate which ones they are currently implementing or are planning / budgeting to implement within the next year.  Their responses were then used to create the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index, which is shown below. 

 

 

When compared to The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which can be found here, The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index illustrates where broadcast technology budgets are being spent today.

Our research shows that the difference between what people are thinking and talking about (trends), and where they are planning to spend their budgets (projects) can be quite dramatic.

For example although “multi-platform content delivery” dominated the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, the corresponding project “distribute and monetize content on multiple distribution platforms,” ranked #9 out of 17 in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index.

In terms of where money is being spent in the broadcast industry today, more broadcast technology buyers cited “upgrading infrastructure for HD/ 3Gbps operations” than any other project.  This project correlates directly with “transition to HDTV operations,” which was ranked #3 in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index.

Although the transition to HDTV operations is certainly not new, it remains one of the key drivers of broadcast technology spending in 2012 and 2013.  Even as a small number of broadcasters announce that they are close to completing their decade-long transition to HDTV, many broadcasters are still in the early stages of the move to HD.  This is especially true in emerging economies where there is still a great deal of both standard definition and analog infrastructure. 

On a global basis, the transition to HDTV has consistently been the top driver of broadcast technology spending for the past several years — it was also the top project last year in the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index – and it appears that this will be the case for the foreseeable future.

Significantly, the move to HDTV is represented in multiple places in the Project Index.  The projects ranked #3, #5, #7, and #10 – upgrading transmission & distribution capabilities; building new studios / OB vans; launching new channels; and upgrading newsroom operations – are also related to the transition to HDTV operations, as these transmission upgrades, new studios, new channels, and upgraded news environments will almost certainly be at least HD capable, if not fully HD.

Coming in as the #2 ranked project on this Index is “Install or enhance workflow / asset management system.”  It also achieved the #2 rank in 2011, but was much further behind the transition to HDTV in terms of overall importance to broadcast customers.

Although asset management is a relatively small and specialized market, it has become increasingly important over the past several years as broadcast customers move to file-based workflows and plan for multi-platform content delivery.  The take-away here appears to be that once a broadcaster has made the transition to file-based workflows, the strategic emphasis shifts to finding, deploying, and monetizing content in the most efficient way possible.  Thus asset and workflow management are likely to become increasingly important as customers move to business models focused on multi-platform content delivery, and driven by sophisticated IT-based systems.

The rest of the list offers a mixed picture of project activity across the world, and includes everything from upgrading audio and newsrooms to multi-platform distribution being chosen in large numbers. 

As mentioned earlier, multi-platform content delivery ranked #9 in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index.  It also was ranked #9 in 2011. Despite the importance to organizations of monetizing content on multiple distribution platforms, it appears many broadcast professionals have not solidified their business plans in this area.  This likely means that there will be significant opportunities in the future for broadcast technology vendors who offer a suite of products for multi-platform content delivery.  The current excitement surrounding OTT video and connected TV is evidence of this, but this is still a small proportion of the money being spent on broadcasting technology in 2012.

Interestingly, despite the fact that they may have the potential to deliver increased efficiencies and new revenue streams, there are several major projects that appear towards the bottom of this list. The two most obvious instances are the low ranking of “consolidate operations in regional hubs (centralcasting), and “outsourced operations (playout),” which are the bottom two projects on this list. This is because although these are high value projects, they will be undertaken by a relatively small number of organizations — i.e. large broadcasters.  This highlights that the 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index is a graphic representation of the number of all planned projects across all respondents, regardless of organization type, size, or location.  It does not measure size, value, or relative commercial importance of planned projects.  Please keep this in mind when reading this information and interpreting these findings.

 

All data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2012 BBS, regardless of organization type, organization size, job title or geographic location. Responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of the full 2012 BBS Global Market Report. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

 .

.

Related Content:

The 2012 Big Broadcast Survey – Information and available reports

The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry in 2011?  The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index.   

.

 © Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

.

 

 

Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry in 2011? The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index.

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, content delivery, market research, technology trends | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 07 2011

 

This is the third in a series of articles about some of the findings from the 2011 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands.  More than 8,000 people in 100+ countries took part in the 2011 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever done in the broadcast industry.

 .

In previous articles, I’ve written about the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which shows the most important trends in the broadcast industry for 2011.  As a follow-up I wrote about how the commercial importance of these trends has changed over time.

Tracking broadcast industry trends is important because it provides insight into which areas are receiving the most attention from technology buyers.  However, it’s important to note that industry trends are a reflection of what customers are thinking and talking about, not necessarily where they are spending money today.

Indeed, the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index includes a mix of current and future commercial priorities, some of which broadcasters have not yet determined how to implement. Thus, while trends are important they do not necessarily translate into where broadcast technology buyers will be spending their budgets in 2011 and 2012. 

Technology spending in the broadcast industry tends to be project-based. Projects might include international elections and sporting championships, to the long-term planned capital upgrades of broadcast infrastructure and facilities.  Thus, an understanding of the major projects being implemented by broadcaster professionals around the world provides useful insight into the capital expenditure plans of the industry.

We presented broadcast professionals with a list of major projects and asked them to indicate which ones they are currently implementing or have planned / budgeted to implement in the next year.  Their responses were then used to create the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index, which is shown below. 

.

.

One look at the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index illustrates the difference between what people are thinking and talking about (trends), and where they are planning to spend their budgets (projects). Although “multi-platform content delivery” dominated the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, the corresponding project “distribute and monetize content on multiple distribution platforms,” ranked #9 out of 15 in the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index.

By a significant margin, more broadcast technology buyers said that they are budgeting for “upgrading infrastructure for HD/ 3Gbps operations” than any other project.  Upgrading infrastructure for HD / 3Gbps operations was also the dominant planned project in the 2010 BBS. 

This project correlates directly with “transition to HDTV operations,” which was ranked #2 in the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index.

The projects ranked 3rd, 5th and 6th – upgrading transmission & distribution capabilities; building new studios / OB vans; and launching new channels – are also related to the transition to HDTV operations, as these transmission upgrades, new studios, and new channels will almost certainly be at least HD capable, if not fully HD.

Many of the other top ranked projects are related to the file-based / tapeless workflow, which ranked #3 in the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index. For example, many respondents indicated that they planning workflow / asset-management; archive-related; and automation projects.

The rest of the list offers a mixed picture of project activity across the world, and includes everything from upgrading audio and newsrooms to multi-platform distribution being chosen in large numbers. 

As mentioned earlier, multi-platform content delivery ranked #9 in the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index.  Despite the importance to organizations of monetizing content on multiple distribution platforms, it appears many broadcast professionals have not solidified their business plans in this area.  This likely means that there will be significant opportunities in the future for broadcast technology vendors who offer a suite of products for multi-platform content delivery.  The current excitement surrounding OTT video, connected TV, and mobile DTV is evidence of this, but these initiatives represent a relatively small proportion of the money being spent on broadcasting technology in 2011.

Interestingly, despite the fact that they may have the potential to deliver increased efficiencies and new revenue streams, there are several major projects that appear towards the bottom of this list. The two most obvious instances are the low ranking of “consolidate operations in regional hubs (centralcasting), and “outsourced operations (playout),” which are the bottom two projects on this list. This is because although these are high value projects, they will be undertaken by a relatively small number of organizations — i.e. large broadcasters.  This highlights that the 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index is a graphic representation of the number of all planned projects across all respondents, regardless of organization type, size, or location.  It does not measure size, value, or relative commercial importance of planned projects.  Please keep this in mind when reading this information and interpreting these findings.

.

.

Keep in mind when reading this information that all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2011 BBS, regardless of organization type, organization size, job title or geographic location.  Responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different than those shown in this high level overview.  Granular analysis of these results is available as part of the full 2011 BBS Global Market Report. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

.

.

Related Content:

You can find out about the 2011 Big Broadcast Survey here.

The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index is here.

The 2010 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index is here.

The 2009 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index is here.

.

.

This article is based on the findings from the 2011 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of industry trends, technology purchasing behavior and the opinion of vendor brands.  With more than 8,000 people in 100+ countries participating, the 2011 BBS is the largest and most comprehensive market study ever done in the broadcast industry.

Devoncroft Partners has published a variety of reports from 2011 BBS data.  For more information, please get in touch.

.

.

©Devoncroft Partners 2009-2011

Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry? — A Review of Major Projects Being Planned

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Mar 25 2010

This is the second in a series of articles about the findings from the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of industry trends, technology purchasing behavior and the opinion of vendor brands.  With more than 5,600 people in 120+ countries participating, the 2010 version of the BBS is the largest and most comprehensive market study ever done in the broadcast industry.

In the current environment, everyone in the broadcast business wants to know what parts of the industry are doing well, where money is being spent, and what is driving this spending.  While there is no absolute answer to these questions, the findings from the 2010 BBS go a long way towards answering them.

Much of the technology purchasing in the broadcast industry is driven by major projects ranging from international events such as elections and sporting championships, to the long-term, planned capital upgrades of broadcast infrastructure and facilities.  Thus an understanding of which major projects are being implemented by broadcaster professionals around the world provides insight the capital expenditure plans of the industry.

Major Projects Planned for this Year

As part of our 2010 broadcast industry market study, more than 3,000 broadcast processionals – including radio and TV broadcasters, cable/satellite/IPTV operators, playout centers, post production facilities, and cable programmers — were asked to provide information about the projects they are currently implementing or are planning to implement in the next 12 months.  

Respondents were presented with a list of major projects and asked to indicate up to five choices that they are currently implementing or have planned / budgeted to implement in the next year.  The chart below shows the percentage of respondents who indicated they are planning to implement each project.  Respondents were also asked to provide budget details for each project.  This budget information along with a granular breakdown of planned projects is available in the 2010 BBS Global Market Report from Devoncroft Partners.

Which technology projects are you currently implementing or planning to implement in the next 12 months?

 

 

By a wide margin, more respondents selected “upgrading infrastructure for HD/ 3Gbps operations” than any other type of project.  It’s interesting to note that last year, in our 2009 broadcast industry market study, that the transition to HDTV operations was ranked by respondents as the technology trend most important technology to their business – and by a similarly wide margin.  In the time since the 2009 BBS was published, broadcast professionals have apparently translated top-ranked trend this into action through real-world projects that are either currently being implemented or planned for the current year. (For reference, you can read about the 2009 industry trends here).

In addition to upgrading infrastructure for HD/3Gbps operations, respondents also indicated that they plan to upgrade their transmission and distribution capabilities – presumably to support their transition to HDTV and to prepare for analog switch-off.

As shown in a previous post about the broadcast industry’s most important technology trends for 2010, the transition to HDTV operations was one of the top-ranked technology trends this year as well.  Indeed there is a strong correlation between how respondents ranked which trends are most important to their business, and the major projects they are planning or implementing. 

The major projects ranking 3rd and 4th in terms of how many respondents plan to implement them were “installing or enhancing a workflow / asset management system”,  and “archive-related projects.”  The high percentage of broadcast professionals planning to implement these projects highlights the fact that the industry is striving for ways to become more efficient and to monetize content in more ways.  It’s also good news for asset management, storage and library management vendors.   

The top four-ranked projects are closely aligned with 2010’s most important trends in the broadcast industry (link), which show that the priorities for the industry are to continue the transition to HDTV operations, while at the same time find ways of being more efficient (through automated and file-based / tapeless workflows), and generating new revenue streams (through multi-platform content distribution).

These results also show that the industry will continue to push ahead with new content creation and delivery projects.  Ranking 5th and 6th on the list of planned projects are “build new studios / OB vans,” and “launch new channels.”  Undoubtedly the vast majority of new studios and OB vans will be HD capable; as will many of the new channels.  It’s also clear from these findings that many of the new channels will undoubtedly have a strong automation component (the #7 project on this list), regardless of whether they are HD or SD.

The rest of project list which was selected by at least 10% of respondents includes offers an interesting picture of project activity across the world, with everything from upgrading audio and newsrooms, to multi-platform content distribution.

It’s worth pointing out here that in the 2010 ranking of the broadcast industry’s most important trends, that multi-platform content distribution was ranked #1 in terms of being “most important” to respondents businesses in the future.  Time will tell whether this will translate into the #1 planned project as was the case with the transition to HDTV operations after it was rank as the most important trend last year.

Finally, let’s examine the four planned projects that appear at the bottom of this list: “install or revamp business management system,” “consolidate operations in regional hubs,” “work with management consultants on business /technology transformation,” and “outsource operations e.g. playout.”

These are all very large projects that will most likely be done by only the largest broadcast professionals.  Keep in mind that the planned project chart in this article shows the responses of all global participants in the 2010 BBS broadcast industry study, regardless of organization type, size or location. Thus it measures the number of planned projects, but does not measure their size, value or relative commercial importance.  The 2010 BBS Global Market Report from Devoncroft Partners provides granular analysis of planned projects, broken down by organization type, size and location.

 

 

 

Published by Devoncroft Partners, the annual Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) is the largest and most comprehensive studies of broadcast industry trends, technology budgets and projects, and technology vendor brands.  The BBS provides insight into market trends and the perceptions of leading broadcast industry vendor brands by a wide variety of broadcast professionals across the world.  It also delivers vendor brand ranking “league tables” in a variety of product categories; all of which can be segmented by geography and customer type.  More than 5,600 people in 120+ countries participated in the 2010 BBS project. Information about the 2010 BBS can be found at www.devoncroft.com

%d bloggers like this: