Posts Tagged ‘2013 Big Broadcast Survey’

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 4 — the 2013 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 19 2013

This is the eighth in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 .

This is the fourth post in a series of articles about how broadcast technology vendors were ranked and benchmarked on a variety of metrics by the respondents to the 2013 BBS.

The first three posts in this series described the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, the 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and the 2013 BBS Global Brand Opinion Leaders League Table.

.

This post looks at one of the most important metrics for any technology company – innovation.

An explanation of how these results were calculated can be found at the end of this article.

The product side of the film & broadcast industry is driven by technology and innovation.  All vendors spend heavily on research and development in order to create advanced technologies that make their products stand out from the competition.  Thus innovation is a very important component of the brand image and reputation of vendors in this space.

 

Please note that both audio and video brands are included in these rankings, and that the table below shown brands in alphabetical order, NOT in the order in which they were ranked in the study. 

 

2013 BBS -- Innovation League Table

 

There are a wide variety of companies on this list, including large and small firms; single product and multi-product firms; global and regional players; and audio and video technology providers.

Let’s look specifically at the how these companies and their products were ranked in the 2013 BBS, beginning with products and technology.

As shown in the chart below, these companies make products in 22 of the 30 product categories that we covered in the 2013 BBS.

.

 

2013 BBS -- Innovation Rankings -- Frequency of Product Categories

 

 

The top offerings provided by brands in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table are production switchers, pro audio products, and test and measurement.

Does company size play a role in innovation?  Larger companies offer more products and are consequently used in more places than their smaller counterparts.  But this does not necessarily translate into innovation.

The chart below breaks down the 2013 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table by the number of product categories (as defined by the 2013 BBS segmentation) offered by each brand listed in this ranking.

 

2013 BBS -- Innovation Rankings -- Frequency of Brands.

.

What’s interesting about these rankings is that it includes the largest brands in the industry such as Cisco, Sony and Panasonic, alongside smaller (and relatively new) companies such as Elemental Technologies and Phabrix.

It’s also interesting to note that just under one-third of the companies listed in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table, are pure-play audio vendors.

There are also quite a few software companies including Adobe, Autodesk, Elemental, Telestream, and Vizrt.

Another thing to note is that this ranking is once again dominated by companies that provide products in a single product category – 19 out of 30 brands in this list (up from 18 in 2012). This suggests that focused companies who apply their efforts to specialist product areas are often able to generate more innovation in the eyes of the market.

At the same time, larger companies are also represented on this list of the broadcast industry’s top innovators. Sony and Snell provide products in the most categories in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table, followed by Adobe, Blackmagic, and Panasonic.

Of course, companies are listed here based on how many 2013 BBS product categories they produce, which is not an absolute measure of the products offered be each vendor on this list. There are some very large companies on the list above who appear in just one 2013 BBS category.

.

Year-Over-Year Changes to BBS Innovation Rankings

The majority of vendors in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table were also listed in this ranking last year.

 

The following new entrants to the BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table are listed in 2013 but were not listed last year:

Elemental Technologies, Leader, Telestream, Yamaha

 

The following brands were listed in the 2012 BBS Broadcast Technology Vendor Innovation League Table, but are not listed this year:

Angenieux, Mackie, Omneon, Salzbrenner Stagetec, T-VIPS

.

 

How These Results Were Calculated

2013 BBS participants were asked to provide their perception of the innovation of a variety of relevant broadcast technology vendor brands on a scale of 1-10 — with 10 being best in the market, and 1 being worst in the market.

This data was then aggregated and averaged in order to generate the global score for each brand based on these responses.

The top 30 global brands for innovation were then sorted by alphabetical order to create the tables shown in this article.

 

When reviewing this information, please note the following:

The inclusion of any brand in the tables in this article is dependent on available sample size.  The minimum sample size for inclusion in the tables shown herein is 30 respondents per cut of the data. Therefore it is possible that a highly regarded brand may have been excluded from any or all of the tables in this article due to insufficient sample size.

Both audio and video brands are included herein, whereas these brands are typically separated in actual BBS reports.

All data these charts are presented in alphabetical order, NOT in the order brands were ranked by respondents to the 2013 BBS.

 

.

The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

 

 

.

.

Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 2 – The 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 3 — The 2013 BBS Global Brand Opinion Leaders League Table

Previous Year: The 2012 BBS Innovation Leaders League Table

.

© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2013. All Rights Reserved.

Findings May Not Be Reproduced or Quoted Without Written Permission from Devoncroft Partners.

.

.

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 3 — The 2013 BBS Global Brand Opinion Leaders League Table

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, market research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 12 2013

This is the seventh in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 .

This is the third post in a series of articles about how broadcast technology vendors were ranked and benchmarked on a variety of metrics by the respondents to the 2013 BBS.

The first two posts in this series described the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and the 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Brand Opinion League Table.

These rankings show how the global sample of 2013 BBS respondents rated a variety of broadcast technology vendor brands in terms of their overall opinion of these vendors, and also how their opinions have changed over time.

A large number of brands were listed in the two previous ranking lists. Between these two sets of league tables, a total of 70 broadcast technology vendor brands were listed (out of a total of 151 brands included in the 2013 BBS (the complete list of brands included in the 2013 BBS can be found here).

There were 46 vendors in the in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table (versus 48 in 2012), and 53 vendors in the 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Brand Opinion League Table (versus 58 in 2012).

However, the brands in the Overall Opinion and Net Change of Opinion rankings were not always the same.  In fact, out of the 70 broadcast technology vendor brands that were listed in the previous two rankings, just 29 brands were listed in both sets of rankings, either globally or regionally.

We’ve called this list of the 29 brands listed in both the 2013 BBS Overall Opinion and Net Change of Opinion rankings the 2013 BBS Brand Opinion Leaders League Table. 

These vendors, shown below, are held in high regard today by broadcast technology buyers, and are also perceived to be getting better over time.

Please note that both audio and video brands are included in these rankings, and that the table below shown brands in alphabetical order, NOT in the order in which they were ranked in the study. 

.

2013 BBS -- Brand Opinion Leaders League Table

 

 

There are a wide variety of companies on this list, including large and small firms; single product and multi-product firms; global and regional players; and audio and video technology providers.

What they have in common is strong brand recognition, and a dynamism that 2013 BBS respondents feel is making them even stronger.

 

Year-over-year changes to these rankings:

Twenty-two in the 2013 BBS Brand Opinion Leaders League Table were listed in the 2012 version of these rankings:

Adobe, Aja Video, Autodesk, Avid, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Cisco, Dolby, Evertz, EVS, Lawo, Neumann, Panasonic, Riedel, Rohde & Schwarz, RTW, Sennheiser, Shure, Snell, Sony, Tektronix, Yamaha

.

The following seven companies in the 2013 BBS Brand Opinion Leaders League Table were not included in this ranking in in 2012

Adam, Angenieux, Fujinon, Solid State Logic, Soundcraft, Studer,  Wheatstone

.

The following eight companies that were listed in the 2012 BBS Brand Opinion Leaders League Table are not included in the 2013 ranking:

Apple, Clear-Com, Genelec, Harmonic, Harris, Omneon, Schoeps, Wohler

 .

Brand Opinion Leaders by Product Categories

As shown in the chart below, the companies in the 2013 BBS Brand Opinion Leaders League Table make products in 23 of the 30 categories that we covered in the 2013 BBS, down from 25 product categories in 2012.

The top products for brand leaders are Audio Mixing Cosoles, Microphones, Audio Processing  and Monitoring, Graphics & Branding, Production Switchers, Signal Processing / Interfacing / Modular, and Video Editing.

 .

 

2013 BBS -- Brand Opinion Leaders -- Frequency Analysis of Product Categories

.

The chart above has a good mix of audio and video products, as well as a mix of hardware and software products.

However, it is interesting to note that many of the most frequently cited product categories are audio-related.  Some vendors on this list, such as Adobe, Avid, Riedel, and Sony, are listed in both audio and video product categories in the 2013 BBS.  Other vendors are listed in only audio categories.  These include Adam, Dolby, Lawo, Neumann, RTW, Sennheiser, Shure, Solid State Logic, Soundcraft, Studer, Wheatstone, and Yamaha.

It is also useful to look at the number of product categories provided by each vendor in the Global Brand Opinion Leader League Table.  After all, larger companies often make more products and are consequently used in more places than their smaller counterparts.

The table below shows the number of product categories that each brand in this ranking produces (as defined by the segmentation used in the 2013 BBS).

 

2013 BBS -- Brand Opinion Leaders -- Frequency Analysis

 

 

 .

While there are several brands on this list that appear in many product categories, the vast majority produce only one or two types of products.  Indeed out of the thirty brands in this table, sixteen brands  appear only once.

Keep in mind that companies who produce only one type of product are not necessarily small.  There are some very large companies on the list above who appear in just one 201 BBS category.

It turns out that to fully understand what drives brand opinion and brand leadership, one needs to look at the factors that drive and influence these perceptions.  This includes the company’s reputation for things like innovation, reliability, quality, value and great customer service.

These metrics will be covered in future posts.

.

.

Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 2 – The 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Previous Year: The 2012 BBS Global Brand Opinion Leaders League Table

.

© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2013. All Rights Reserved.

.

.

.

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 2 – The 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, market research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 05 2013

This is the sixth in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 

Previous articles about the 2013 BBS discussed the most important broadcast industry trends, how the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends have changed over time, where money is currently being spent in the broadcast industry, broadcast technology products being evaluated for purchase in 2013 and 2014, and the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table.

 

This is the second in a series of posts about how broadcast technology vendors were ranked and benchmarked on a variety of metrics by the respondents to the 2013 BBS.

The first post in this series described the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, which shows how 2013 BBS respondents ranked broadcast vendor brands.

This post looks at how the global sample of broadcast professionals who participated in the 2013 BBS ranked their Net Change of Overall Opinion of the 151 broadcast technology vendors we covered in the study.

 

Net Change of Overall Opinion

While it’s good news for any vendor to achieve a good “overall opinion” ranking, this metric is somewhat one-sided because it relies solely on the positive opinions of respondents.

In order to get a better understanding of how broadcast technology vendor brands are perceived, it is necessary to look at both the positive and negative opinions of brands. It is also necessary to take into account how these opinions have changed over time.

Once this information has been collected, we use it to create the Net Change of Overall Opinion Ranking, a metric that demonstrates which brands are perceived as getting better, and which are in decline, on an overall basis. Net Change in Overall Opinion provides a more balanced view each brand because it takes into account both the positive and negative perceptions of brands, along with how these opinions have changed over time.

An explanation of how these results were calculated can be found at the end of this article.

The complete list of vendor brands covered in the 2013 BBS is here.

 

The Net Change in Overall Opinion findings from the 2013 BBS are shown below in two ways:

  • An overall industry “league table” that shows the 30 highest ranked vendors for the metric “Net Change of Overall Opinion.”  The data in this chart is broken out globally and regionally.

 

  • An analysis of the “frequency” of appearance of each vendor in the Net Change of Overall Opinion league table

 

The top 30 ranked brands for Net Change of Overall Opinion are shown below for both the global sample of all respondents as well as for all respondents in each of the geographic regions.

When reading these results, please keep the following in mind.

 

Both audio and video brands are included in these rankings, and all response data shown herein is from the global sample of from all 2013 BBS participants, regardless of organization type, size, geographic location, or size of budget; and that actual results in the BBS Brand report may be different.

Please note that inclusion of any brand in any cut of the data shown the tables in this article is dependent on available sample size.  The minimum sample size for inclusion in these charts is 30 respondents per cut of the data. Therefore it is possible that a highly regarded brand was excluded from these findings based on sample size.

In all cases, these results are shown in alphabetical order, NOT in the order in which they were ranked by respondents to the study.


The 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table:

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion

 

 

A total of 53 broadcast technology vendor brands are included in this table (versus 59 in 2012 and 51 in 2011), illustrating the geographic variation of opinion. Analysis of these results shows that are some clear market leaders on a global basis, while others are strong on a regional basis.

It’s useful to understand how often each brand appears in the 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table.

This is shown below, along with the equivalent data from both 2012 and 2011 for comparison.

 

Frequency of appearance of brands in the 2013 BBS Net Change in Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 10 brands appear four times (compared to 9 brands in 2012 and 13 brands in 2011), meaning they were ranked in the top 30 globally and in each geographic region

 

  • 13 brands appear three times (compared to 13 brands in 2012 and 10 brands in 2011)

 

  • 11 brands appear two times (compared to 11 brands in 2012 and 9 brands in 2011)

 

  • 19 brands appear one time (compared to 26 brands in 2102 and 19 brands in 2011).  This illustrates a fragmentation of opinion  about many brands based on geography

 .

 

Brands appearing four times in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

 

  • 2013 BBS: Adobe, Aja Video, Autodesk, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Evertz, Panasonic, Riedel, Rohde & Schwarz, Sennheiser

 

  • 2012 BBS: Adobe, Avid, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Harmonic, Panasonic, Riedel, Sennheiser, Sony

 

  • 2011 BBS: Adobe, Aja Video, Apple, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Cisco, Genelec, Omneon, Panasonic, Riedel, Sennheiser, Sony, Tektronix

 

 

Brands appearing three times in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 2013 BBS: AmberFin, Angenieux, ateme, Cisco, Elemental Technologies, EVS, Harmonic, NewTek, Ross Video, Sony, Telestream, Vizrt, Wide Orbit

 

  • 2012 BBS: Aja Video, Apple, Autodesk, Digital Rapids, EVS, Front Porch Digital, NewTek, Omneon, Phabrix, Rhozet, Ross Video, Vizrt

 

  • 2011 BBS: Ateme,  Evertz, EVS, Harmonic, Net Insight, Rhozet, Rohde & Schwarz, Ross Video, Shure, Vizrt

 

 

Brands appearing two times in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

 

  • 2013 BBS: Adam, Ensemble, Front Porch Digital, Lawo, Net Insight, Neumann, Nevion, Phabrix, Screen Service, Snell, Solid State Logic

 

  • 2012 BBS: AmberFin, ateme, brightcove, Cisco, Gigawave, Net Insight, Rohde & Schwarz, Screen Service, Tektronix, Telecast, Wohler

 

  • 2011 BBS: AKG, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Ensemble,  Front Porch Digital, Lawo, Telestream, TVIPS, Wohler

 

 

Brands appearing once in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:

  • 2013 BBS: arvato / S4M, Avid, Axon, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Fujinon, Linear Acoustic, On-Air (Oasys), Ooyala, RTW, Shure, Soundcraft, Studer, Tektronix, Telecast, TVIPS, Wheatstone, Xen Data, Yamaha

 

  • 2012 BBS: Aspera, Axon, Calrec, Clear-Com, Dolby, Elemental Technologies, Ensemble, Envivio, Evertz, Genelec, Harris, Isilon Systems / EMC, Kaltura, Kit Digital, Lawo, Neumann, PubliTronic / Grass Valley, RTW, Schoeps, Shure, Snell, Telestream, Wheatstone, Wide Orbit, Wowza, Yamaha

 

  • 2011 BBS: AmberFin, Audio-Technica, Avid, Fujinon, Grass Valley, Harris, Inlet Technologies, Linear, Linear Acoustic, Miranda, MSA Focus, Nevion, Playbox, PubliTronic, Schoeps, Screen Service, Solid State Logic, Telecast, Yamaha

 

..

Frequency Analysis of the Brands in the in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table:  

In order to provide a better understanding of which brands were most highly ranked in each geographic region, the data has been provided in the table below, which shows the global and regional performance for each brand in the top 30 ranking of overall opinion.

.

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion -- Frequency Analysis

 

 .

This frequency analysis chart shows that there are some interesting geographic variations in the data. Here’s a closer look at how brands appeared by geography:

 

Appearing only in the global ranking of the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

Four brands achieved a top 30 ranking in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion league table, despite not being listed in the top 30 of any of the three geographic regions.  This may be a function of sample size.  As discussed above, there is a minimum sample size requirement for inclusion in each cut of the data presented in these chart, and the global ranking, by definition, has the largest overall sample.

  • Ensemble, On-Air Systems, Ooyala, Xen Data

 

Appearing only in one region of the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

The following  brands appear in one regional category of the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table, but do not appear in the global ranking:

  • Arvato/S4m, Avid, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Fujinon, Linear Acoustic, RTW, Shure, Soundcraft, Studer, Tektronix, Telecast, T-VIPS, Yamaha

 

Appearing only in the EMEA region in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Arvato/S4m, Axon, RTW

.

Appearing only in the Asia-Pacific region in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Avid, Digital Rapids, Dolby, Fujinon, Shure, Soundcraft, Studer, Tektronix, Yamaha

 

Appearing only in the Americas region in the 2013 BBS Net Change of Overall Opinion League Table

  • Telecast, T-VIPS, Wheatstone

.

 

How These Results Were Calculated

No company is perfect, and the brands we measured in the 2013 BBS are no different.  All brands in the 2013 BBS had both positive (got better) and negative (got worse) connotations associated with them.  There were also are significant percentage of respondents who said their opinion of a brand had “stayed the same.”

2013 BBS participants were asked to rank their opinion of broadcast technology vendor brands on a scale of 1-10 — with 10 being best in the market, and 1 being worst in the market.

We then asked respondents whether their opinion of these brands has changed over the last few years – specifically whether they feel their opinion of each brand has “improved,” “declined” or “stayed the same.”

The Net Change in Overall Opinion for each brand was then calculated by subtracting the percentage of respondents who said a brand “got worse” from the percentage of respondents who said their opinion of a brand had “got better,” while ignoring the “stayed the same” responses.

This “change of opinion data” provides a more comprehensive view of how each brand is perceived by the market because it takes into account positive and negative perceptions.

 

 

Please note that inclusion of any brand in the tables in this article is dependent on available sample size.  The minimum sample size for inclusion in the tables shown herein is 30 respondents per cut of the data. Therefore it is possible that a highly regarded brand may have been excluded from any or all of the tables in this article due to insufficient sample size.

Also, please keep in mind when reviewing this information that all data these charts are presented in alphabetical order, NOT in the order brands were ranked by respondents to the 2013 BBS.

 

.

The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

.

.

Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Previous Year:  The 2012 BBS Net Change of Overall Brand Opinion League Table

.

© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

.

.

 

When Will Broadcast Engineers Be Replaced as Key Decision Makers?

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 12 2013

“The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated.”
– Mark Twain

.

This is the sixth in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 

In a previous article we discussed how the “transition to file based operations” has become increasingly important to broadcasters and media companies over the past five years, and is now ranked as the #2 trend in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index.

The transition to file-based operations has a number of significant implications for both broadcasters and technology vendors.

A primary benefit of file-based workflows is increased operational efficiency, which our research shows is now one of the primary drivers of broadcast technology purchasing.  In many cases, increased operational efficiency and saving cost is more important than cutting-edge technology.

In response to this trend, vendors have beefed up their software offerings, and many are working to port functionality that has traditionally been performed in hardware to software-based systems running on generic IT hardware.  Our research shows that as a result of this, vendors predict that the mix of products they sell is likely to shift in favor of software versus hardware.

The shift of many products from hardware to software products beg the question of whether the background and job title of the decision makers will shift as well. Ever since the beginning of file-based systems, industry participants have been predicting that traditional broadcast engineers will be replaced by IT personnel.

What do technology vendors think?

As part of the 2013 BBS, we asked more than 1,000 executives of broadcast technology vendors who they see as the key decision maker today, and who they believe this will be in 2-3 years’ time.

The results, shown below, reveal that vendors believe that a power shift within their customer base is coming over the next several years.

 

2013 BBS -- Vendors which category of buyer is most important

 

 

Today, vendors see engineering staff as their most important customers, followed by operations, IT, and finance personnel, but they predict the power of the engineer as decision maker will decline in favor of not only operations, but also IT departments and finance personnel.

These findings appear to be consistent with the changing priorities of broadcast technology buyers illustrated in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index.  It stands to reason that as technology buyers complete their HD build-outs, their commercial focus is shifting towards achieving operational efficiencies and generating new revenue streams.

Although broadcast engineers are still perceived by vendors to be the top dog when it comes to making procurement decisions, they also believe that changing customer priorities will erode this position and shift decision making power to other departments.

The demise of the broadcast engineer as key decision maker has been long-predicted by industry pundits as IT technology has permeated the broadcast industry.

Is now the time when this will actually happen?

Given the fact that we ask this question in the context of both what’s happening today and what respondents predict about the future, the answer to this question depends in large part on the clarity or cloudiness of the technology vendor’s crystal ball.

Because we’ve been asking this same question to vendors for several years, it’s now possible to go back and review the answers and compare them to future predictions.

The chart below consolidates the responses to this question for the past four years.

 

2013 BBS -- Vendors which category of buyer is most important -- 2010-2013

.

 

Notice the similarity in the way this question has been answered since 2010.  In fact, the results from 2010 – 2013 are nearly identical.

In other words, for the past four years vendors have been predicting that by 2012-2013 the importance of engineers as key buyers would have diminished considerably in favor of other departments, particularly IT.

However, in 2013 vendors ascribe the same importance to engineers as they did in 2010.

What’s going on?  It is likely that three years ago engineers were seen by vendors as potentially losing out to operations and IT staff because they required new skills.  However it’s apparent that in the intervening timeframe, broadcast engineers have sharpened their IT and networking skills, and perhaps consolidated their position within their organizations.  Another possibility is that respondents tend to over-predict the velocity of change in the market.  Or perhaps it’s a combination of the two.

Whatever the reason, it appears that as Mark Twain might have said: “reports of the demise of broadcast engineers have been greatly exaggerated.”

 .

.

 

The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

.

.

Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

Previous Year: The 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

.

© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

.

.

 

 

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 10 2013

This is the fifth in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

Previous articles about the 2013 BBS discussed the most important broadcast industry trends, how the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends have changed over time, where money is currently being spent in the broadcast industry, and broadcast technology products being evaluated for purchase in 2013 and 2014.

 

How 2013 BBS Participants Ranked Broadcast Technology Vendors

This is the first in a series of posts about how broadcast technology vendors were ranked and benchmarked on a variety of metrics by the respondents to the 2013 BBS.

Each year, as part of the Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), we ask a global sample of broadcast professionals to rank a variety of technology vendor brands on a wide range of metrics.

We use this information to create a series of reports, which through benchmarking and industry “league tables” provides a view as to how each vendor is positioned in the market relative to the industry as a whole, as well as against their direct competitors.

This post looks at how the global sample of broadcast professionals who participated in the 2013 BBS ranked their overall opinion of the 151 broadcast technology vendors we covered in the study.

An explanation of how these results were calculated can be found at the end of this article. The complete list of vendor brands covered in the 2013 BBS is here.

 

Research findings are displayed in two ways in this article:

  • An overall industry “league table” that shows the 30 highest ranked vendors for the metric “overall opinion.”  The data in this chart is broken out globally and regionally

 

  • An analysis of the “frequency” of appearance in the “overall opinion league table”

 

The top 30 ranked brands for overall opinion are shown below for both the global sample of all respondents as well as for all respondents in each of the geographic regions.

.

Please note that in all cases, these results are shown in alphabetical order, NOT in the order in which they were ranked by 2103 BBS participants.      

 .

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table (smaller)

 

 .

A total of 46 broadcast technology vendor brands are included in this table, (versus 48 in 2012 and 43 in 2011), illustrating the geographic variation of opinion, which will be discussed later.

In terms of frequency of appearance in the above ranking:

.

  • 17 brands appear four times, meaning they were ranked in the top 30 globally and in each of the three geographic regions.  For comparison, in the 2012 BBS (when we covered 152 brands) there were 15 brands that appeared in the top 30 globally and in each of the 3 regions.

 

  •  9 brands appear three times, versus 10 brands that appeared three times last year.

 

  • 5 brands appear two times, versus 7 brands that appeared two times last year. 

 

  • 15 brands appear one time, which demonstrates that some brands are strongest in one geographic area. In the 2012 BBS, 16 brands appeared one time.

 

Analysis of the data shows that are some clear market leaders on a global basis, while others are strong on a regional basis.

A breakdown of how many times each company appears in the ranking shows how many times each brand appears in the chart above.

.

Brands appearing four times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table: 

The following brands are listed four times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, meaning that research participants ranked them in the top 30 for overall opinion globally, as well as in each of the three geographic regions:

  • Adobe, Aja Video, AKG, Blackmagic Design, Canon, Cisco, Dolby, Genelec, Neumann, Panasonic, Rohde & Schwarz, Sennheiser, Shure, Solid State Logic, Sony, Studer, and Tektronix

 

Although many of these brands also appeared four times in the BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table last year, there are also several changes to the composition of this list.

The following brands that appear in all four categories (global, EMEA, APAC, Americas) in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table were listed fewer than four times in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table. The numbers shown in parentheses show the number of times each brand was listed in the BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table last year, and the year-over year change:

  • Aja Video (2x, +2), Blackmagic Design (1x, +3), Rohde & Schwarz (3x, +1), Solid State Logic (2x, +2), Studer (2x, +2)

 

The following brands were listed in all four categories in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and appear fewer than four times in 2013:

  • Apple, Avid, Schoeps

 

 

Brands appearing three times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table: 

The following brands are listed three times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table.

The numbers shown in parentheses show the number of times each brand was listed in the BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table last year, and the year-over year change:

  • Angenieux (3x, no change), Avid (4x, -1), Clear-Com (3x, no change), EVS (1x, +2), Fujinon (3x, no change), JBL (3x, no change), Schoeps (4x, -1), Snell (2x, +1), Yamaha (3x, no change)

 

The following brands were listed in three categories in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and appear fewer than three times in 2013:

  • Autodesk, beyerdynamic, Ikegami, Wohler

 

 

Brands appearing two times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table:

The following brands are listed two times in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table.

The numbers shown in parentheses show the number of times each brand was listed in the BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table last year, and the year-over year change:

  • Apple (4x -2), Autodesk (3x, -1), beyerdynamic (3x, -1), Mackie (+2), Soundcraft (+2)

 

The following brands were listed in two categories in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and appear fewer than two times in 2013:

  • Electro Voice, Grass Valley, RTW

 

 

Brands appearing one time in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table:

The following brands are listed one time in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table.

The numbers shown in parentheses show the number of times each brand was listed in the BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table last year, and the year-over year change:

  • Adam (no change), Audio-Technica (+1), Barco (+1), Evertz (no change), Grass Valley (2x, -1), HP (no change), Ikegami (3x, -2), Lawo (no change), Leader (+1), NEC (no change), Riedel (no change), RTS Intercom Systems (no change), RTW (2x, -1), Wheatstone (+1), Wohler (3x, -2)

 

The following brands were listed in one category in the 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table, and are not listed in 2013:

  • DK Technologies, Harmonic, Harris, Omneon (not covered in 2013 BBS), Salzbrenner Stagetec, Telex, Thomson

.

.

Frequency Analysis of the Brands in the in the 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table:  

The table below, which shows the global and regional performance for each brand in the top 30 ranking of overall opinion, provides a better understanding of where each brand was highly ranked for overall opinion.

.

 

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table Frequency Analysis (smaller)

 

.

The frequency chart shows some interesting geographic variations in the data, which is detailed below.

.

Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking globally + one region

Three brands achieved a top 30 ranking globally, despite being in the top 30 of only one out of the three geographic regions.

  • Apple, Autodesk, beyerdynamic

 

Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking in one region

The following 15 brands did not make the top 30 in the global league table of overall opinion, but they did appear in the top 30 overall opinion ranking in one of the geographic regions:

.

Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking only in EMEA

  • Barco, Lawo, Riedel, RTW

.

Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking only in Asia-Pacific

  • Audio-Technica, Evertz, HP, Leader, NEC

 

Appearing in the top 30 “overall opinion” ranking only in the Americas

  • Adam, Grass Valley, Ikegami, RTS Intercom Systems, Wheatstone, Wohler

 

.

How These Results Were Calculated

2013 BBS participants were asked to rank their opinion of broadcast technology vendor brands on a scale of 1-10 — with 10 being best in the market, and 1 being worst in the market.

This data was then aggregated and averaged in order to generate the global score for each brand based on these responses. In order to create the regional scores, this data was broken out geographically based on the location of the respondent.

The top 30 brands for each of the four ranking lists (global, EMEA, Asia-Pacific, Americas) was sorted by alphabetical order to create the tables shown in this article.

Please note that inclusion of any brand in the tables in this article is dependent on available sample size.  The minimum sample size for inclusion in the tables shown herein is 30 respondents per cut of the data. Therefore it is possible that a highly regarded brand may have been excluded from any or all of the tables in this article due to insufficient sample size.

Also, please keep in mind when reviewing this information that all data these charts are presented in alphabetical order, NOT in the order brands were ranked by respondents to the 2013 BBS.

.

.

The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

.

.

Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

Previous Year: The 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

.

© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

.

.

 

 

Business Model Questions Linger As Broadcasters Shutter 3D Offerings in Favor of Multi-Screen Services

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 05 2013

Earlier this week the BBC announced that it will broadcast select matches from the Wimbledon Championships in 3D this year.  At that time, Kim Shillinglaw, Head of BBC 3D, said: “We’re delighted to provide live 3D coverage from the biggest matches of this year’s Wimbledon. Major UK sporting events are a big part of our trials with 3D content and this allows us to build on our work from previous Wimbledon Championships and the London 2012 Olympics.”

Now, Broadband TV News reports that the BBC is taking “a three-year holiday from the development of 3D programming with the corporation’s head of 3D admitting the UK public had not taken to the format.”

Broadband TV News quotes the BBC’s Shillinglaw saying “Watching 3D is quite a hassly experience in the home. You have got to find your glasses before switching on the TV. I think when people watch TV they concentrate in a different way. When people go to the cinema they go and are used to doing one thing – I think that’s one of the reasons that take up of 3DTV has been disappointing.”

Shillinglaw’s sentiments echo the statement made by ESPN last month and first reported by the Sports Video Group (SVG) that the leading US sports network was discontinuing its ESPN 3D service “due to limited viewer adoption of 3D services to the home.” ESPN went on to say that it plans on committing the resources currently assigned to 3D production to “other products and services that will better serve fans and affiliates,” specifically citing 4K (UHDTV) as an example.

At the time of the ESPN announcement, SVG said that the discontinuation of ESPN 3D raises serious questions regarding the future of 3D sports programming in the U.S. While Europe — especially the UK — has seen continued interest in live 3D sports, American consumers failed to adopt the format at a high rate.” The BBC’s announcement implies that UK consumer appetite for 3D is as lukewarm as it has been in North America, making it impractical for even a publicly funded broadcaster to continue with the format.

A remaining piece of the 3D puzzle is the 2014 FIFA World Cup, which will probably be the most watch global event of the year.  According to SVG, HBS (Host Broadcast Services), which will produce the world feed for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, has yet to confirm whether the tournament will be produced in 3D.

 

Research Shows Commercial Importance of 3D Down, Multi-Screen Up

These announcements from BBC and ESPN are consistent with the findings of the Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), our annual study of the global broadcast industry.  In particular, the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, reveals that multi-platform content delivery is once again the top industry trend for broadcast technology end-users worldwide, while 3D lags far behind in terms of its commercial importance to broadcast professionals.

Not only have research participants consistently told us that 3D lags other industry trends in terms of its commercial importance to their businesses, we’ve also found that 3D has become increasingly less important each year for the past several years.

For example, the chart bellows shows the chart below shows a comparison of the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index from 2012 and 2013.  It measures changes in how end-users ranked the commercial importance of industry trends on a year-over-year basis.

 

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index -- Red Box Around 3D (small)

 

Note that in this chart, 3D had the largest reported year-over-year percentage decline in commercial in both between 2012 and 2013.  This was also the case last year.

However, the above chart also demonstrates that while interest in 3D has waned, multi-platform content delivery is and continues to be the dominant trend in the broadcast industry, with more research participants citing it than any other trend as being most important commercially to their business.

The BBS’s plans for Wimbledon are further evidence of this.  The broadcaster said that it will make coverage of the tournament available on an increasing number of platforms, including ten live streams that will be available to PCs, mobiles, tablets and connected TVs.  The BBC will also offer three streams for “Red Button” for viewers on cable and satellite and Digital Terrestrial TV.

 

What about the business model?

Our research, as well as studies from many other firms, leaves no doubt that the popularity of multi-screen services in increasing.

However, it’s another matter to create a commercially successful business model in an environment where audiences are fragmenting, additional content preparation costs are required, and bandwidth providers charge steep fees for unicast delivery of video stream to consumers.

Delivering multi-screen services to consumers is a relatively straightforward process from a technical perspective. Monetizing content on multiple platforms, devices, and use cases is a different matter.

For example, in March 2013 Broadcasting and Cable magazine reported that one panelist at Next TV Conference said that multi-platform content monetization is still a ‘train wreck,’ although other did express “great optimism about the leaps technology will take in coming years.”

In our conversations with broadcasters, Devoncroft analysts have found that many broadcasters and media companies are indeed finding it a challenge to create a sustainable multi-screen business model with a margin profile similar to their traditional business.

The issue is that the shift to multi-platform has dramatically altered the economic model of the TV business. There are a number of reasons and examples why this is the case, but the end-result is that many broadcasters and media companies feel that in order to thrive in this new environment, they must radically change their cost structure.

The resulting decision these organizations will take will have significant implications for content owners, broadcasters, and technology vendors.

We’ll be addressing some of these in future posts on this website.
Some of the information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location. Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

.

.

Related Content:

Broadband TV News: BBC puts 3D development on hold

BBC Press Release: BBC confirms 3D coverage plans for Wimbledon

Sports Video Group: ESPN To Discontinue ESPN 3D by Year’s End  

Broadcasting & Cable: Monetization Still a ‘Train Wreck,’ But Shows Signs of Clearing

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

.

.

© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2013. All Rights Reserved.

.

.

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, Quarterly Results | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 03 2013

This is the fourth in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 

Previous articles about the 2013 BBS discussed the most important broadcast industry trends, how the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends have changed over time, and where money is currently being spent in the broadcast industry.

This article expands on the findings of the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index by drilling down into the specific product categories that are being evaluated for purchase this year by our global sample of nearly 10,000 broadcast technology end-users in 100+ countries.

We presented research participant with a list of relevant product categories and asked to indicate which ones they are currently evaluating for purchase.

The results are shown in the chart below.

 

2013 BBS -- Product Being Evaluated for Purchase

 

In 2013 it is likely that production technology – such as video editing systems, camera-related products, and audio technology – will be in demand as broadcast professionals continue to upgrade their facilities to HDTV operations.

The new studios, OB vans, and channels that broadcasters have planned and budgeted for will drive the evaluation and purchase of a wide variety of equipment including studio cameras, production switchers, multiviewers, automation, storage, and transmission encoders. As always, test & measurement products will be required for these new facilities.

Strong interest in multi-platform content delivery is driving interest in products and services such as ingest/ streaming/ transcoding and online video delivery platforms.

The ongoing transition to file-based/tapeless workflows will drive the evaluation and purchase of products such as near-line/off-line/archival storage, production servers, and playout automation.

All of the above will likely benefit software-oriented systems such as workflow / asset management, library/storage management, and broadcast business management systems. These products help broadcast technology increase their operational efficiency by facilitating content storage & search; linear and multi-platform playout & distribution; and of course monetization.

 

The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

.

.

Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

.

.

© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

.

.

 

 

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 01 2013

This is the third in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

 

In a previous article, we published the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which shows how a global sample of nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals ranked a set of broadcast industry trends in terms of the commercial importance of each one to their business.

This was followed by a post called Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013, which examined how the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends have changed over time.

Rather than looking at industry trends, which are often an indicator of what might happen in the future, this article examines what technology products and services are actually being purchased today by broadcasters and media companies globally.

.

 

The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index (which can be found here) showed that the top-ranked broadcast industry trend in 2013 is “multi-platform content delivery.”  Other important trends include “file-based workflows,” “IP networking and content delivery,” and the “transition to HDTV operations.”

The 2013 BBS Trend Index includes a mix of current and future commercial priorities, some of which have already been widely deployed, on a wide scale, some of which are currently being trialed, and others which have not yet been widely implemented. Industry trends evolve and change over time, so tracking this evolution is helpful to better understand what customers are discussing and thinking about implementing in the future.

However, a top ranking in an industry trend Index does not necessarily translate into where broadcast technology buyers are actually spending their budgets in 2013 and 2014. Therefore, it’s important to make a clear distinction between what broadcast customers are thinking and talking about doing in the future (trends), and where they are spending their technology budgets today (projects).

Technology spending in the broadcast industry is typically project-based. Real (budgeted) projects are where broadcast technology budgets are being spent today, not just what people are talking about doing in the future.

Capital projects come in many forms.  They might include international elections, sporting championships, new services designed to attract incremental revenue, and the long-term planned capital upgrades of broadcast infrastructure and facilities.

In order to better understand this dynamic, we presented 2013 BBS participants with a list of 18 projects (determined based on feedback of BBS stakeholders), and asked them to indicate which of these projects they are currently in the process of implementing or have budgeted to implement within the next year.

Unlike industry trend data, which highlights what respondents are thinking/talking about doing in the future, this information provides direct feedback about what major capital projects are being implemented by broadcast technology end-users around the world, and provides useful insight into the capital expenditure plans of the industry.

Taken together, information about trends and projects collected in the 2013 BBS can be used to understand the difference between “trend and spend,” and/or hype and reality.

 

The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index, shown below, measures the number of projects that research participants are currently implementing or have budgeted to implement.

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

 

Comparing the above chart with the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index illustrates the difference between what end-users are thinking and talking about (trends), and where they are actually planning to spend their budgets today (projects).

While “multi-platform content delivery” was this year’s top-ranked trend, when it comes to where money is actually being spent in 2013, more broadcast technology buyers said that they have budgeted for “upgrading infrastructure for HD/ 3Gbps operations” than any other project.

This finding is consistent with our previous research. Upgrading infrastructure for HD / 3Gbps operations has consistently been the top driver of broadcast technology spending for the past several years, and this is once again the case in 2013.

This year’s top project correlates directly with “transition to HDTV operations,” which was ranked #4 in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index.

The projects ranked #3, #4, #5, #7, #9, and #12 in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index – “upgrading cameras,” “upgrading transmission & distribution capabilities;” “building new studios / OB vans;” “launching new channels;” and “upgrading newsroom operations” – are also related to the transition to HDTV operations. These new cameras, transmission upgrades, new studios, new channels, and upgraded news environments will almost certainly be at least HD capable, if not fully HD.

In some cases, industry trends and budgeted projects line up nicely. In others however, there are significant differences.

A good example of the latter is “multi-platform content delivery,” which has been the top-ranked trend in the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index since 2010, and dominated the Index this year.  However, the corresponding project measured in the chart above, “distribute and monetize content on multiple distribution platforms,” ranked #10 out of 18 in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index, significantly below items ranked much lower in the BBS Trend Index.

These findings are consistent with previous BBS studies, as well as our other research in the professional broadcast technology marketplace.

Despite strong interest in multi-platform content delivery, it appears that creating a sustainable (and profitable) business model for distributing and monetizing content on multiple digital distribution platforms has proven elusive to date for both end-users and technology vendors.

We have conducted numerous projects about multi-platform business models that involved interviewing senior executives from broadcasters and media companies. Although these executives immediately agree that getting to “multi-platform nirvana” is strategically important to their organizations, many readily admit that they have yet to find the right business model.

Many broadcasters and content owners believe that in order to achieve increased revenue and profitability in a multi-platform world, they must first dramatically increase their efficiency through the implementation of new workflows and technical systems, some of which do not yet exist.

This implies that there are likely to be significant opportunities in the future for broadcast technology vendors that are able to solve the technical, operational, and business challenges facing end-users who see multi-platform distribution and monetization as a critical part of their business strategy.

It also helps explain why “file-based/tapeless workflows” was ranked #2 in the 2013 BBS Trend Index, with many research participants saying it is the industry trend that is most important commercially to their businesses over the next few years.

Indeed, a number of capital projects are being implemented in 2013-14 are directly related to “file-based/tapeless workflows” trend. Examples of this are “cloud technology/cloud services,” “workflow / asset-management,” “archive-related projects,’ and “automating workflows.”

In particular, the #2 ranked project in 2013 — “install or enhance workflow / asset management system” – is an area where there has been a great deal of recent activity. Although it may seem that MAM has been set to become “the next big thing” for the past decade or so, it now appears that broadcasters are increasingly focusing on MAM deployments.

One reason for this could be that many end-users believe that in order to be profitable in a multi-platform world, they must significantly increase the efficiency of their operations, and broader use of MAM is seen as one part of solution.

Indeed, in a recent Devoncroft project, more than half of the senior executives from broadcasters and media companies we interviewed cited multi-platform content distribution as the factor that will drive the most change in their organizations over the next few years; and because of this, more than two-thirds predicted their spending on MAM and workflow tools will increase over the next two years.

The remainder of the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index offers a mixed picture of project activity across the world, and includes everything from upgrading audio and newsrooms to migrating infrastructure from copper to fiber.

And as seen in the 2013 BBS Trend Index, some projects are being planned as the direct result of government or corporate mandates. “Prepare for analog switch-off” is the best example of this.  In the territories where governments have mandated a switch to digital broadcasting, tremendous planning and focus is being devoted to these projects, resulting in strong revenue for transmission and distribution-related products and services.

Interestingly, despite the fact that they may have the potential to deliver increased efficiencies and new revenue streams, some very large projects appear towards the bottom of this list. For example, “consolidate operations in regional hubs (centralcasting),” and “outsourced operations (playout),” are the bottom ranked projects in 2013. This is because although these are high value projects, they will be undertaken by a relatively small number of organizations — i.e. large broadcasters.  This highlights that the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index is a graphic representation of the number of all planned projects across all respondents, regardless of organization type, size, or location.  It does not measure size, value, or relative commercial importance of planned projects.  Please keep this in mind when reading this information and interpreting these findings.

.

The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location.  Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

.

.

Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2012 – 2013

Devoncroft Partners: 2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

Previous Year: The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

.

.

© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved.

.

.

 

 

2013 Broadcast Industry Market Research Findings

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jun 28 2013

Since we are often asked for broadcast industry market research information, we have compiled a list of the articles that have been published based on our 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS).

This list will be updated when new articles are published, so please check back regularly.

If you are not familiar with the BBS, it is an annual global of the broadcast technology and digital media market.  Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries participated in the 2013 BBS, making it BBS the largest and most comprehensive study ever done in the broadcast industry.

The BBS is the definitive demand-side study of the broadcast industry and is used by a wide variety of technology vendors, investment banks, broadcasters, and strategy consultants.

BBS Reports deliver insight into the opinions and attitudes of key technology buyers including broadcasters, playout centers, cable/satellite/IPTV operators, radio stations, recording studios and more. This includes industry trends; purchase intent and buying behavior; major project plans; products being evaluated for purchase; and detailed opinions of vendor brands.

To find out more about the 2013 BBS, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

.

Selected Market Research Findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey

.

1. The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – Information and available reports

An overview of the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), including a review of the types of available reports, and a complete listing of technology vendor brands and product categories covered in 2013.

 

 

2. Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

This article examines how a global sample of broadcast technology end-users rated a variety of industry trends in terms of commercial importance to their business. The results are presented via the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which ranks the commercial importance of each trend across the entire industry.

 

 

3. Tracking Changes in the Commercial Importance of Broadcast Industry Trends, 2012 – 2013

Understanding changes in how technology buyers rank the relative commercial importance of industry trends provides important insight into what might be next for the industry. This article discusses the evolution of the annual BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, and looks specifically at the year-over-year changes between 2012 and 2013.

 

 

4. Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

A comprehensive understanding of the commercial importance of industry trends is very useful to broadcast technology strategists. However, industry trends are often an indicator of what may happen in the future, rather than where money is being spent today – indeed, the two can actually vary considerably. This article describes the major capital projects that broadcasters and media companies have budget to deploy in the near-term, and by extension the products and services that will likely be purchased.

 

 

5. Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

This article expands on the findings of the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index by drilling down into the specific product categories that are being evaluated for purchase in 2013 – 2014 by our global sample of nearly 10,000 broadcast technology end-users in 100+ countries.

 

 

6. Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

This post looks at how the global sample of broadcast professionals who participated in the 2012 BBS ranked their overall opinion of the 151 broadcast technology vendors we covered in the study.

Research findings are displayed in two ways in this article:

  • An overall industry “league table” that shows the 30 highest ranked vendors for the metric “overall opinion.”  The data in this chart is broken out globally and regionally.
  • An analysis of the “frequency” of appearance in the “overall opinion league table”

 

 

7. When Will Broadcast Engineers Be Replaced as Key Decision Makers?

Our research shows that the transition to file-based workflows is an important issue for broadcasters and media companies. As a result, vendors are now offer software providing functionality traditionally performed by hardware products.  The shift of many products from hardware to software products beg the question of whether the background and job title of the decision makers will shift as well.

This article examines who broadcast technology vendors say is the most important decision maker at their customers today, and how this may change over the next 2-3 years. Broadcast engineers are seen as the most important decision maker today, but will this continue?

 

 

Related Content:

When Will Broadcast Engineers Be Replaced as Key Decision Makers?

Ranking Broadcast Technology Vendors Part 1 – The 2012 BBS Overall Brand Opinion League Table

Broadcast Technology Products Being Evaluated for Purchase in 2013 – 2014

Analyzing Where Money is Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry – The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Project Index

Tracking Changes in the Commercial Importance of Broadcast Industry Trends, 2012 – 2013

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

.

© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2013. All Rights Reserved.

.

.

 

Tracking Changes in the Commercial Importance of Broadcast Industry Trends, 2012 – 2013

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jun 26 2013

This is the second in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. 

.

In a previous article, we published the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which shows how a global sample of nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals ranked a set of broadcast industry trends in terms of the commercial importance of each one to their business.

This article compares how the relative commercial importance of these trends has changed over time, and looks specifically at what trends were ranked higher or lower in terms of commercial importance in 2013 versus 2012 by our global panel of research participants.

 

Why Tracking Movement of Trends is Important

Understanding changes in how technology buyers rank the relative commercial importance of industry trends provides important insight into what might be next for the industry.

Whereas it’s tempting to use historical sales data to try to determine what factors will drive industry CapEx in the future, it’s actually quite difficult to use the relative performance of a technology vendor in the past as predictor of the behavior of technology buyers in the future.

Broadcast industry CapEx tends to be project-based. Expenditure is typically contemplated based on business needs, and then deployed according to available resources. And yet, technology buyers must always be cognizant of a wide variety of factors, including technology evolution, business risk/reward, and even government intervention.

Changes to end-user rankings of the commercial importance of trends can be used to predict where technology expenditure may be headed in the future.

This is because industry trends drive capital projects, which in turn drives technology budgets, which in turn drives product purchase.  In other words, what technology buyers say is commercially important to their business in the future (i.e. trends) will likely turn into what they are budgeting for tomorrow (i.e. projects).

Therefore it’s useful to review how the relative importance of broadcast industry trends has changed over time, because it provides a preview of where technology purchases will be made in the future.

 

  • In 2009, the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index was dominated by the “transition to HDTV operations.”  “Multi-platform content delivery” was ranked #4 on this list.

 

  • The following year, in 2010, “multi-platform content delivery” had become the most important industry trend, narrowly eclipsing “file-based/tapeless workflows” (which were combined in the 2010 index) and the “transition to HDTV operations.”

 

  • By 2011, multi-platform content delivery began to dominant trend in the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, ranking significantly higher than all other industry trends.  Analog-switch-off was added to the Index in 2011.

 

  •  Last year (2012) multi-platform content delivery continued to dominate the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, and file-based workflows surpassed transition to HDTV operations for the first time.  Cloud computing/cloud-based services was added to the Index in 2012.

.

.

The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

To create the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, we presented BBS respondents with a list of 16 industry trends and asked them to tell us which one trend they consider to be “most important” to their business, which one trend they consider to be “second most important” to their business, and which other trends (plural) they consider to be “also very important.”

We then apply a statistical weighting to these results, based on how research participants ranked the commercial importance of each trend, and use this information to create the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, which is shown below.

2013 BBS -- 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

 

In 2013, “multi-platform content delivery” was ranked by research participants as being the most important industry trend – by an order of magnitude versus other trends included in the 2013 Index.  More information about the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index can be found here.

In the context of this article, it should be noted that trends included in the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index have not changed from the previous year.

The composition of the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index is reviewed each year in conjunction with Devoncroft clients, broadcast technology end-users, and a variety of domain experts.  New trends are added to the Index when BBS stakeholders believe that the value of this additional trend information outweighs the resulting distortion of the year-over-year comparisons.

Based on this input, it was decided not to make any changes to the composition of the 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index. The benefit of this is that it’s easy to make a 1:1 comparison of how trends were ranked in 2013 versus 2012.  The downside is that some emerging trends such as 4K, bonded cellular, HEVC encoding, social TV etc., were not included in the 2013 Index.   However, these issues (and more) were included in other parts of the 2013 BBS, and there is a significant amount of available data on these subjects within various 2013 BBS reports.

.

.

Comparing the Commercial Importance of Broadcast Industry Trends in 2013 Versus 2012 

The chart below shows a comparison of the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index from 2012 and 2013.  It measures changes in how end-users ranked the commercial importance of industry trends on a year-over-year basis.

 2013 BBS -- Comparison of 2012 and 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index (white background)

 

MPCD, file-based/tapeless workflows, IP networking & content delivery, and the transition to HD operations have occupied the top four positions in the BBS Global Trend Index since its inception in 2009, although it is interesting to note there has been considerable movement in their position in the actual rankings.

While multi-platform content delivery (MPCD), was once again the top-ranked trend in 2013, it did decline slightly on a year-on-year basis versus the rest of the Index. Nevertheless, MPCD was ranked considerably higher in 2013 than any other trend, which was also the case in 2012.

 

Leaving aside the numerical rankings for the moment, other observable changes in the relative commercial importance of broadcast industry trends between 2012 and 2013 include:

  • Y-Y increases in the relative importance of “IP networking & content delivery,” “improvements in video compression efficiency,” “cloud computing/cloud-based services,” “move to automated workflows,”  “centralized operations,” “transition to 5.1 channel audio,” “outsourced operations,” and “green initiatives.”

 

  • Y-Y decreases in the relative importance “multi-platform content delivery,” “file-based/tapeless workflows,” “transition to HDTV operations,” “video on demand,” “targeted advertising,” “analog switch-off,” and “3D-TV”

 

Some of these changes are subtle, and do not necessarily imply that the relative importance of the trends have changed over time.  However, other movements in the Index do indeed impact the actual numerical position of each trend within the ranking.

 

 

Changes in Numerical Ranking in the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

As shown below, there were some interesting changes in the numerical ranking of the trends in the 2013 Index versus the 2012 Index.

The column on the left of the table below shows the numerical rankings of trends in 2013. The number in parentheses to the right of each trend shows how it ranked in the 2012 BBS Index. Although there were no changes at the top and bottom of the 2013 Index versus the 2012 Index, there was movement in between.

2013 BBS -- Numerical Ranking Changes -  2012 and 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

 

 

Several trends were ranked more highly in 2013 than in 2012.  For example, IP networking & content delivery moved up one spot to the #3 ranking (eclipsing the transition to HDTV operations for the first time in the Index).

Other net gainers in numerical rankings include IP networking & content delivery, cloud computing/cloud-based services, centralized operations, transition to 3Gbps (1080p) operations, and transition to 5.1 channel audio; all of which show year-over year increases in the Index ranking.

Net decliners in 2013 versus 2012 include the transition to HDTV operations, video on demand, analog switch-off, and 3D-TV, which had the largest year-over-year percentage drop.

The table below provides a consolidated view of the relative movement in numerical rankings of broadcast industry trends between 2012 and 2013.

 

2013 BBS -- Chages of Relative Imporance of 2012 versus 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

 

So what does this all mean?

On a global basis, the strong showing of “file-based workflows,” coupled with a y-y decline in the commercial importance of the “transition to HDTV operations” implies that those broadcasters that have largely completed their HD transition are now focusing on introducing efficiencies that will ultimately lead to new sources of revenue.

Indeed, the continued domination of “multi-platform content delivery” and “file-based workflows,” combined with the increasing importance of “IP networking & content delivery” and “cloud computing/cloud-based services” demonstrates that in 2013 broadcast technology buyers will spend money to create operational efficiencies, while at the same time working to generate new revenue streams through multi-screen offerings.  However, it remains to be seen whether many broadcasters will be able to create sustainable profits from multi-platform offerings.

It should be noted that there may be significant regional variations in this data.  For example, the transition to HDTV operations is likely to remain a strong driver for those end-users who have not yet started, or substantially completed their migration to HD.  Likewise, although “analog switch-off” is ranked towards the bottom of the 2013 Index, it’s probably safe to assume this is a top priority in in those territories where governments have mandated a switch to digital broadcasting.

 

 

Turning Talk into Action – When do Trends Become Capital Projects?

There is a difference between recognizing that a trend is commercially important and having a business plan in place that capitalizes on that trend.  As stated previously, our view is that industry trends drive capital projects, which in turn drive technology budgets, which in turn drive product purchase.  In other words, what technology buyers say is commercially important to their business in the future (i.e. trends) will likely turn into what they are budgeting for tomorrow (i.e. projects).

The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index shows that monetizing content on multiple platforms remains the top objective for broadcast professionals in the year ahead.  However, many industry participants — on both the content and technology sides of the business — are still experimenting with their business models.

At some point these trends will drive capital projects, if they are not already doing so today.  When that happens they will become major drivers of technology spending in the broadcast industry.

In a future article, we’ll look at where money is being spent today in the broadcast industry.

 

 

The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2013 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Unless otherwise specified, all data in this article measures the responses of all non-vendor participants in the 2013 BBS, regardless of factors such as organization type, organization size, job title, purchasing and geographic location. Please be aware that responses of individual organization types or geographic locations may be very different. Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2013 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

.

.

Related Content:

The 2013 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) – overview of available reports, including covered brands and product categories

Largest Ever Study of Broadcast Market Reveals Most Important Industry Trends for 2013

The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

Tracking the Evolution of Broadcast Industry Trends 2009 – 2012

The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2010 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2009 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

.

.

© Devoncroft Partners. All Rights Reserved..

.

.

%d bloggers like this: