Archive for the ‘broadcast technology market research’ Category

Industry Thought Leaders to Discuss “Shifting Media Economics: Impact on Strategy, Finance, and Technology” at 2015 NAB Show

Analysis, broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast technology vendor financials, Broadcast Vendor M&A, Conference Sessions, Online Video, OTT Video | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 09 2015

Whether you are a supplier, buyer, or investor in the media technology sector, you won’t want to miss the fourth annual NAB Show event co-produced by Devoncroft Partners and the organizers of the NAB Show.

 

NAB Devoncroft 2015 Shifting Media Economics Session Announcement

 

Now part of the NAB 2015 Media Finance and Investor Conference, “Shifting Media Economics: Impact on Strategy, Finance, and Technology,” will be held on Sunday April 12, 2015 in room N235 of the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Designed to be a thought-provoking kickoff to the 2015 NAB Show, this half-day conference examines the “the business of the media business” from the perspective of all levels of the media value chain. It includes panel discussions featuring C-level executives from leading broadcasters, service providers, technology vendors, and private equity investors. Each group will offer a candid assessment of how their respective business models, operational practices, and strategic decision making have been impacted by the dramatic shift in media industry economics.

The keynote, “The Future of TV. One Man’s Opinion.” will be delivered by Bob Bowman, President, Business & Media of Major League Baseball (MLB), who oversees MLB Advanced Media (MLBAM) and MLB Network.

MLBAM has been involved with several recent high-profile streaming events including WrestleMania 31, the opening day of Major League Baseball, the NCAA March Madness basketball tournament, and the recent launch of HBO Now.  Bowman is scheduled to take the stage just one hour before the highly anticipated season 5 premiere of “Game of Thrones” becomes available via HBO Now.

The conference will also include presentations of the latest market research on industry trends and financial performance.  This includes preliminary excerpts from the Devoncroft Big Broadcast Survey, the industry’s definitive demand-side study of the broadcast and digital media industry; and the 2015 IABM DC Global Market Valuation Report, the industry’s definitive supply-side market sizing report.

In advance of the NAB Show, Devoncroft Partners has published an analysis of the trends and strategic drivers in the broadcast and media technology sector. This report is available to download here (registration required).

This conference is intended for senior executives from technology vendors, end-users, and investment firms in the media technology sector. It provides an excellent opportunity to network with industry executives and the financial community ahead of NAB show commitments.

Approximately 400 executives attended this standing-room only event in 2014. We hope to see you there on Sunday April 12, 2015.

Please note that because this event is part the 2015 NAB Show Media, Finance and Investor Conference, registration is required.

 

An overview of the conference is included below.  Full details are available on the NAB Show website.

 

Shifting Media Economics: Impact on Strategy, Finance, and Technology

 

1:40pm – Welcome and Introductions

Presenter:

  • Peter White, CEO IABM

 

 

1:50pm – Review of Market Developments

Josh Stinehour of Devoncroft will take the podium for his annual (enthusiastic) presentation on developments in the media technology sector.  If you have any final announcements you would like Josh to consider for his presentation, let him know.

Presenter:

  • Joshua Stinehour, Principal Analyst Devoncroft Partners

 

 

2:15pm – The Broadcast & Media Technology Industry in 2015

Devoncroft founder Joe Zaller will present a data-driven overview of the forces bringing dynamic change to the media technology sector in 2015. This will include preliminary results of the 2015 Big Broadcast Survey, the industry’s most comprehensive demand-side study, and observations from the 2015 IABM DC Global Market Valuation Report, the industry’s definitive supply-side market sizing report.

Presenter:

  • Joe Zaller, President Devoncroft Partners

 

 

2:40pm – Business Strategy Perspectives from Industry Executives

CEOs from four of the media and broadcast industry’s largest technology suppliers will debate the most important commercial issues facing the industry, and discuss their strategies to position their companies for success in a rapidly evolving marketplace.  The panelists will also offer opinions on how changes in the business environment are impacting vendors and customers.

Moderator:

  • Joe Zaller, President Devoncroft Partners

 

Panelists:

  • Patrick Harshman: President and Chief Executive Officer, Harmonic, Inc.
  • John Stroup: President, Chief Executive Officer, Belden, Inc.
  • Tim Thorsteinson: Chief Executive Officer, Quantel and Snell
  • Charlie Vogt: Chief Executive Officer, Imagine Communications

 

 

3:20pm – The Broadcast Buyer Perspective on Industry Trends

Senior technology executives from four leading broadcasters will offer informed perspectives on the most significant industry trends affecting technology budgets and the technology purchase decision.  The audience will benefit from an emphasis on the business implications of technology decisions to broadcasters.

Moderator:

  • Joe Zaller, President Devoncroft Partners

 

Panelists:

  • Ken Brady: SVP Media Technology and Operations, Turner Broadcasting Systems
  • Richard Friedel: EVP & General Manager, Fox NE&O
  • Fred Mattocks: GM Media Operations & Technology, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  • Bob Ross: SVP East Coast Operations, CBS Broadcasting, Inc.

 

 

4:00pm – The Service Provider Perspective on Industry Trends

A panel of executives from leading media service providers will discuss views on both technology developments and deployment considerations for media organizations.  Discussion topics will include solutions for multi-platform content delivery, the economics of outsourcing, how service providers can leverage their scale to deliver increased performance and agility, and how next-generation data center architecture may impact the media ecosystem.

Moderator:

  • Joe Zaller, President Devoncroft Partners

 

Panelists:

  • Darcy Antonellis: Chief Executive Officer, Vubiquity
  • Anil Jain: SVP & GM Media Group, Brightcove, Inc.
  • Steve Plunkett: Chief Technology Officer, Ericsson Broadcast & Media Services

 

  

4:30pm – The Institutional Investor Perspective on Industry Trends

A panel of leading investment professionals in the media and entertainment sector will offer the audience the institutional investor’s perspective on the industry. The discussion will include the panelists’ intelligence-gathering plans for the NAB Show, views on the trends that are driving investment dollars in the sector, and a review of the characteristics influencing the evaluation of an investment opportunity in the media technology industry.

Moderator:

  • Joshua Stinehour, Principal Analyst Devoncroft Partners

 

Panelists:

  • Chris Kanaley: Vice President, Parallax Capital
  • Nick Lukens: Vice President, Vector Capital
  • Bryce Winkle: Vice President, The Gores Group

 

5:00pm – Keynote: The Future of TV. One Man’s Opinion.


Presenter:

  • Bob Bowman, CEO MLB Advanced Media

 

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2015. All Rights Reserved.

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Download New Devoncroft Partners Report: NAB 2015 – Observations and Analysis of the Media Technology Industry

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 09 2015

In advance of the 2015 NAB Show, Devoncroft Partners has published an analysis of the trends and strategic drivers in the broadcast and media technology sector.

A link to download this report can be found at the bottom of this page.

 

Devoncroft Partners - 2015 NAB Show Strategic Analysis

 

The report covers and provides commentary on a variety of significant market trends, drivers, and events, including:

  • Market dynamics: step-change in media technology growth, and ongoing value shift

 

  • Financial performance of selected industry vendors

 

  • Consolidation, investor activity, M&A – end-users, service providers, and vendors

 

  • Fierce competition in media, and the opportunity for value creation

 

  • Digital Disruption – this time it’s for real, and the implications extend far beyond the obvious

 

  • Transition of traditional revenue models to new platforms

 

  • Uncertainty about the future of technology deployments

 

  • Fundamental implications to technology vendors, service providers

 

  • Business, technical transitions facing vendors, service providers

 

  • Thoughts on the future

 

Included in the analysis are preliminary excerpts from the 2015 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), the largest and most comprehensive study of technology trends, buyer behavior, and vendor brands in the broadcast and media technology sector.

We welcome feedback, comments, and questions on this report.

If you would like to schedule a meeting at the NAB Show, please let us know as soon as possible.  We are in the process of finalizing the NAB Show schedule for the Devoncroft team, and have limited availability remaining.

We hope to see you in Las Vegas.

 

Please click here to download a PDF copy (6 MB) NAB Show 2015 – Observations and Analysis of the Media Technology Industry from Devoncroft Partners (registration required).

 

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2015. All Rights Reserved.

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Avid and Adobe Integrate Editing and Storage Systems

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Mar 10 2015

Adobe_LogoAvid Logo_ white  backgroundSince launching its Media Central platform last year, Avid been telling the industry that they are the “most open” company in the media technology space.

Today Avid went a long way towards putting its money where its mouth is, by announcing that its ISIS high-performance shared storage systems now fully support Adobe’s Premier Pro CC editing platform.

According to the two companies Adobe has made enhancements to Premiere Pro CC that “significantly improve its performance when connected to Avid ISIS® | 7500 and ISIS | 5500 shared storage systems.”

Adobe and Avid have also enabled interoperability between their editing systems, meaning “it’s now possible to mix Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro CC on the same ISIS system in the same storage group, without worrying about complex configuration issues or performance compatibility.”  The collaboration also enables users to “edit higher resolution projects using Premiere Pro CC on ISIS shared storage more efficiently and cost effectively than ever before.”

Avid said the collaboration between the two companies is “unprecedented,” and “delivers on the openness of Avid Everywhere, by enabling flexible and efficient workflows for all video editors and creative professionals, regardless of their choice of editing application.”

“We are pleased that Avid’s shared storage systems now provide the high performance required for Adobe solutions,” said Simon Williams, director of strategic relations at Adobe. “With this news, Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Media Composer can share Avid DNxHD or Avid DNxHR media and other open file types on the same infrastructure. Our large base of shared customers will undoubtedly realize significant workflow benefits from this collaboration.”

“One of the critical issues facing broadcasters and post-production facilities is the drag on productivity caused by having to manage and integrate different solutions from different vendors with different standards,” said Ray Gilmartin, senior director, Product and Segment Marketing, Avid. “This collaboration between Avid and Adobe is an example of the openness and flexibility that we are committed to delivering to the industry with Avid Everywhere.”

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Related Content:

Press Release: Avid and Adobe Collaborate on Integration With Shared Storage to Enhance Openness, Flexibility, and Efficiency

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2015. All Rights Reserved.

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Save the Date: Fourth Annual “Shifting Media Economics: Impact on Strategy, Finance, and Technology” at NAB 2015

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Mar 02 2015

Whether you are a supplier, buyer, or financier of media technology; if you’re interested in the business of the media business, you won’t want to miss the fourth annual NAB Show event co-produced by Devoncroft Partners and the organizers of the NAB Show.

NAB Devoncroft 2015 Shifting Media Economics Session Announcement.png

 

Part of the NAB 2015 Media Finance and Investor Conference, it is called “Shifting Media Economics: Impact on Strategy, Finance, and Technology,” and will be held on Sunday April 12, 2015 in the Las Vegas Convention Center.

This half-day event includes panel discussions featuring C-level executives from leading broadcasters, service providers, technology vendors, and private equity investors.  Each group will offer a candid assessment of how their respective business models, operational practices, and strategic decision making have been impacted by the dramatic shift in media industry economics.

It will also include presentations of the latest market research on industry trends and financial performance.  This includes preliminary excerpts from the Devoncroft Big Broadcast Survey, the industry’s definitive demand-side study of the broadcast and digital media industry; and the 2015 IABM DC Global Market Valuation Report, the industry’s definitive supply-side market sizing report.

A preliminary agenda is available here, but is subject to change.  The agenda will be updated as speakers are confirmed.

This conference is intended for senior executives from technology vendors, end-users, and investment firms in the media technology sector; and conference registration is required.

Approximately 400 executives attended this standing-room only event in 2014. We hope to see you there in April 2015.

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2015. All Rights Reserved.

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EVS Parts Ways with CEO Joop Janssen Over Differing Opinions on Strategic Implementation

broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Oct 13 2014

Production and playout video server specialist EVS announced that CEO Joop Janssen is leaving the company, effective as of October 14, 2014.

Jassen remains available to EVS as an advisor, allowing for a smooth transition.

The decision was made during a meeting on October 10, 2014, during which the company’s board of directors and Janssen mutually agreed to end the term of the office and duties of Janssen as managing director and CEO of EVS.

According to EVS, Jassen and the company are parting ways “due to differences in view about the implementation of the company’s long term strategy.”

EVS says its board of directors has launched the search for a new CEO.

In the interim, Muriel De Lathouwer, currently a member of the Board of Directors of EVS, chairing the Strategy Committee, has been appointed as the President of the Executive Committee. “I have great confidence in Muriel De Lathouwer’s capacities to perform this task, in close cooperation with the management team in place,” Pierre Rion added.

Jassen, who was named CEO of EVS in 2012, unveiled a new corporate strategy in early 2013 that focused EVS on four key markets: Sports, Entertainment, News and Media.  At that time, Janssen said the new strategy will “enable us to better deliver our investments in R&D and product innovation, help drive the expansion of our sales network, and continue to improve our user training and customer support and bring even better products to the market faster.”

“The entire Board of Directors would like to thank Joop Janssen for his work during the past two years. Under his leadership, the structure of EVS has been strengthened and professionalized, enabling the company to further grow in its four key markets: Sports, Entertainment, News and Media,” said Pierre Rion, Chairman of the Board of Directors of EVS.

Prior to joining EVS, Jassen was the Chief Executive of the Videocom division of the Vitec Group. During his nine years with Vitec Videocom he was the architect behind its significant profitable growth and brand expansion. Prior to that he was VP and General Manager of Phillips Broadcast (formerly BTS) North America where he was instrumental in the successful divestment to Thomson Multimedia and the subsequent acquisition of the Grass Valley Group. He has held senior and executive management positions including those at Philips Electronics Digital Networks in France and Philips Business Electronics in the Netherlands.

EVS says its board of directors has launched the search for a new CEO.

In the interim, Muriel De Lathouwer, currently a member of the Board of Directors of EVS, chairing the Strategy Committee, has been appointed as the President of the Executive Committee. “I have great confidence in Muriel De Lathouwer’s capacities to perform this task, in close cooperation with the management team in place,” Pierre Rion added.

During her career, Muriel De Lathouwer worked for Accenture, was Associate Principal at McKinsey and a member of the Executive Committee at Base (KPN). She is an Engineer from ULB (University of Brussels) and holds an MBA from INSEAD.

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Related Content:

Press Release: EVS Announces Departure of Joop Janssen, Managing Director and CEO

EVS Posts Record Revenue in 2012, Unveils New Strategy and Vision for Future

Press Release: EVS Broadcast Equipment Appoints Joop Janssen as CEO

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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There’s a Lot of Talk About Cloud Technology in Media & Entertainment, But What’s Actually Being Deployed?

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Sep 30 2014

This is the second in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2014 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

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There’s no question that cloud technology is a hot topic in the media and entertainment industry.

Indeed, it seems that these days you can’t read anything about industry technology trends (in broadcast or any other industry for that matter), NAB or IBC Show wrap-up piece, and/or manufacturer white paper, without coming across some mention of “the cloud.”

We see this in our own research too.

In the 2014 Devoncroft BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, “Cloud Services / Cloud Technology” was ranked the #5 in terms of the industry trends that are most important commercially to broadcast technology end-users world-wide.

This indicates that while there continues to be skepticism (not to mention security concerns) about cloud technology, the acceptance of (or at least the willingness to consider) cloud technology and services increased rapidly in 2014.

For example, data from the Devoncroft 2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) Global Market Report shows that Cloud Services / Cloud Technology had one of the largest year-over-year percentage increases in terms of broadcast technology end-user project spending, when compared to wide variety of other capital projects.

So while there is still a great deal of hype about cloud in media and broadcast, there also appears to be genuine interest on the part of buyers to actually deploy technology in the cloud.

But what are buyers of broadcast technology actually planning to deploy in the cloud, and do they actually trust cloud technology?

To find out we asked participants in our 2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) what they have already deployed, or plan to deploy in the cloud over the next 2-3 years.

Since we typically get about 10,000 people in 100+ countries participate in the BBS (thanks to all who participated, we really appreciate the time you spent sharing your feedback and opinions), we’ve gathered a lot of data on this and many other topics.

As simple example is shown in the “word cloud” below, which provides a graphical representation of how the many thousands of broadcast technology end-users who participated in the 2014 BBS responded to this simple question:  “what have already deployed in the cloud, or plan to deploy in the cloud over the next 2-3 years?”

Please note that the chart shown below is derived from “free-text” answers received in 10 separate languages from the many thousands of 2014 BBS respondents, so there is a lot going on in this diagram.

The free-text responses from 2014 BBS participants were used to create the “word cloud” shown below, whereby the font size of each term was made larger based on how often it was mentioned by 2014 BBS respondents (the colors do not mean anything, but they are pretty).

 

 

2014 BBS -- Likely Cloud Deployments in Broadcast Over Next 2-3 Years (small)

 

 

Although the data in this chart just scratches the surface in terms of the overall scope of opinions captured in the 2014 BBS, it’s a useful illustration of what broadcast technology buyers are thinking about actually deploying in the cloud.

It’s probably not surprising to most readers that “storage” was the use-case mentioned most often by 2014 BBS participants. The combination of low-cost digital acquisition technology, ever-increasing shooting ratios, and the desire to monetize content assets over multiple distribution platforms is driving the need for more storage (both on and off-premise). As one vendor told me recently, “the one thing I can tell you about content archives is that they are not getting smaller every day.”

More interesting, is that when you compare the above diagram with how last year’s BBS respondents answered this same question, is appears that there is more consensus beginning to emerge about media use-cases for cloud technology beyond the obvious.

In previous years, BBS respondents also reported that storage was one of the most important things they planned to deploy in the cloud.  However, after storage, the next most important response was typically “I Don’t Know.”

While there are still some BBS respondents who remain unsure about their cloud deployment plans, there are now many fewer, and it appears that in 2014 broadcast technology end-users are more serious than ever about deploying cloud technology.

In 2014, commonly cited use-cases for media and entertainment cloud deployments include streaming, archiving, editing, transcoding, and content distribution.

It’s also interesting to see specific vendors (including Adobe, Amazon AWS, Apple, and Dropbox) being frequently mentioned as being “the thing” that will be deployed in the cloud. This may indicate that technology buyers are looking to these vendors to provide them anything from specific cloud-based tools, to a complete end-to-end cloud solution.

Leaving aside specific technologies and vendors, sometimes it’s more useful to “zoom out to a 10,000 foot view” of the potential deployments of cloud technology in the professional media and entertainment industry.

Considered from this perspective, we believe that more significant than the technologies and vendors mentioned in the above chart, is the fact that cloud technology is being seen as increasingly important by major broadcasters and media companies.

There is plenty of evidence to support this premise, including several recently announced end-user initiatives and many discussions about creating a “virtualized broadcast infrastructure” in order to drive greater efficiencies. If this is the case, there are significant implications for all involved in the media supply chain, including both vendors and end-users.

Much more information about the attitudes of broadcast technology buyers towards cloud technology, and what broadcast technology buyers are likely to actually deploy in the cloud is available from Devoncroft Partners as part of our 2014 BBS Global Market Report. This report also includes information about what technologies end-users are planning to deploy in the cloud, when they are planning to deploy them, and what efficiencies they hope to achieve by doing so.

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Related Content:

2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) Reports Now Available

2014 Broadcast Industry Market Research from Devoncroft Partners

Devoncroft Research: IBC 2014: Observations and Analysis of Broadcast and Media Technology Industry (free 52 page report, registration required)

2014 BBS: Ranking the Most Important Trends in the Broadcast Industry, Based on Commercial Importance to End-Users

2013 BBS: With All the Hype About Cloud, What Are Media Organizations Actually Going to Deploy?

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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Ranking the Most Important Trends in the Broadcast Industry, Based on Commercial Importance to End-Users

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Sep 29 2014

This is the first in a series of articles about some of the findings from Devoncroft’s 2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2014 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry.

 

Measuring the Most Important Trends in the Broadcast and Digital Media Technology Industry

Each year, Devoncroft Partners conducts a large-scale global study of the broadcast industry called the Big Broadcast Survey (BBS).  Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries participated in the 2014 BBS, making it the most comprehensive study ever done in the broadcast industry.

One of the key outputs from the BBS is the annual BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index. This is a ranking of the broadcast industry trends that are considered by BBS respondents to be the most commercially important to their businesses in any given year.

In order to ensure that the trends we measure each year in our research are the most relevant to the industry, we spend a considerable amount of time seeking feedback about the structure of our reports from a wide variety of industry professionals.

As part of this process, the composition of the BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index is reviewed each year in conjunction with Devoncroft clients, broadcast technology end-users, and a variety of domain experts.  New trends are added to the Index when BBS stakeholders believe that the value of this additional trend information outweighs the resulting distortion of the year-over-year comparisons.

Based on the input we received during the planning stages of the 2014 BBS project, it was decided that the following two trends should be added to the list of trends included in the composition of the 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index:

  • 4K / UHD
  • Remote Production

 

The benefit of this change is that we were able to capture a significant amount of information about information about the perceptions of 4K/UHD and remote production, including deployment plans.

The downside of this approach is that the inclusion of new trends will almost certainly cannibalize the rankings of other trends in our Index. Therefore, it is slightly more complicated to make a 1:1 comparison of how trends were ranked in 2014 versus 2013 across different demographics.

 

The 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

To create the 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, we presented BBS respondents with a list of 18 industry trends and asked them to tell us which one trend they consider to be “most important” to their business, which one trend they consider to be “second most important” to their business, and which other trends (plural) they consider to be “also very important.”

We then apply a statistical weighting to these results, based on how research participants ranked the commercial importance of each trend.

Please note that our goal from this question is to help clients gain insight into the business drivers behind the respondent’s answer. Therefore, respondents were asked to rank these trends in the context of the commercial importance to their business, rather than “industry buzz,” or “cool technology,” or marketing hype.

The table below shows the 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index.

 

2014 Devoncroft BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

 

Keep in mind that this chart shows a measure of what people say is important to the future of their businesses, not what they are doing now, or where they are making money today.  These topics will be addressed in future posts.

Please note that this chart shows a weighted index, not a measure of the number of people who said which trend was most important to them.

Also, please note that this chart measures the responses of all non-vendors who participated in the 2014 BBS, regardless of company type, company size, geographic location, job title etc.  Thus the responses of any demographic group such as a particular company type or geographic location may vary widely from the results presented in this free summary information.

The fact that multi-platform content delivery (MPCD) is considered by respondents to be the industry trend that is most important commercially to their business jumps off the page, and is perhaps not surprising, given the rise of on-demand video platforms, consumer mobility, and sales of smartphones and tablets.  Indeed, across multiple studies, research participants have repeatedly told us that multi-platform content delivery is the trend that is most commercially important to their business over the next several years.

However, our discussions with broadcasters, content owners, and technology vendors indicate that despite the obvious fact that the way content is delivered and consumed has changed forever, this has not yet translated into profitable revenue streams for end-users.  There are a number of reasons why this is the case, and these have significant implications for content owners, broadcasters, and technology vendors.

These will be addressed in future posts, as well as on the Devoncroft website.

Although multi-platform content delivery is by far seen as the most important trend in 2014, there are quite a few other interesting things to consider in the above chart.

Since the first BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index was published in 2009, “multi-platform content delivery,” “file-based / tapeless workflows,” “IP networking and content delivery” and transition to HDTV operations” have been the top ranked trends.  However their relative position has shifted dramatically.  For example, in 2009, the transition to HD operations was the #1 ranked trend globally, and MPCD was ranked #4.  In 2014, these were ranked #6 and #1 respectively.

For a number of years the transition to HDTV operations has been a major driver of end-user technology budgets, and therefore technology product sales. The HD transition continues to be and is likely to remain one of the strongest drivers of broadcast industry revenue, particularly in emerging markets, but has this year dropped to the #6 position on a global basis.

We provide significant coverage of the global transition to HDTV operations in the 2014 BBS Global Market Report (report available for purchase). This includes a granular breakdown of the current and projected future progress that end-users have made in their transition to HD, as well as the upgrade plans for more than a dozen product categories including cameras, switchers, routers, servers, graphics, encoders, communication links, and encoders. We’ll also be publishing more information about project-based spending and the HD transition later in this report, as well as on the Devoncroft website.

Another trend that has become increasingly more important over the past several years is “IP networking & content delivery,” which is ranked as the #2 most important trend in the 2014 BBS Global Trend Index.

The move to IP-based infrastructure become increasingly important as broadcast technology buyers continue to look for efficiencies as they transition to new technical platforms and business models.  In 2014, the move to IP-based infrastructure took on a new sense of urgency as buyers began to seek ways to implement IP-based systems in broadcast operational environments.

With new standards (e.g. SMPTE 2020-6), new market entrants (e.g. Arista Networks), and a high-profile joint task force on networked media (JT-NM), sponsored by the EBU, SMPTE, and VSF; the move to IP not only looks more and more inevitable, it is also likely to be a major industry driver over the mid to long-term.  As a result, we believe that the coming move to IP (which is still at least a year or two away in practice) has profound implications for both broadcast technology buyers and suppliers.

The move to IP is driven by an ever-increasing desire for broadcast technology buyers to gain operational efficiencies.  We believe this trend is set to accelerate, and will continue to be a strong macro driver of the overall industry for the next several years, as broadcasters continue to deploy new workflows.

The trend ranked #3 in the 2014 BBS Global Trend Index, “file-based / tapeless workflows,” is another indication of the importance of increased efficiency for broadcast technology end-users.  This trend has accelerated as the transition to HDTV (ranked #6 this year) begins to wind down in developed markets around the world.

Over the past several years, we’ve observed a pattern whereby broadcasters, who have invested considerable time, effort, and money into transitioning their operations to HD, begin to shift their focus towards increasing the efficiency of their operations.

Over time, efficiency has become a key driver of broadcast technology purchasing.  In fact, our research shows that in many cases, increased operational efficiency and cost savings are more important than cutting-edge technology.

This is because the economics of the entire industry have changed – because of MPCD and other factors – and as a result, end-users must change their cost structure (radically in some cases) in order to generate sustained profitability into the future.

This has implications for the broadcast industry in terms of both workflows and product procurement, and as a result, the importance of both file-based workflows and “IP networking & content delivery” has increased as broadcast technology buyers continue to look for efficiencies as they transition to new technical platforms and business models.  The desire for broadcast technology buyers to gain operational efficiencies will likely continue to be a strong macro driver in 2014, as broadcasters continue to deploy new workflows.

The trend ranked #4 in the 2014 BBS Global Trend Index is “4K / UHD.

2014 is the first year that we have included 4K / UHD as a component of the BBS Global Trend Index. It was added based on feedback from our clients, readers, and stakeholders.  The fact that 4K / UHD is ranked #4 in the first year of its inclusion in the Index demonstrates that these requests were well-founded.

Although 4K / UHD is still in its early phases of deployment, many in the industry see it as the next major driver of infrastructure upgrades – similar to the transition to HD a decade ago.

While there is no doubt that 4K / UHD is a very important developments, we are skeptical that it will have the same impact on the industry as the transition to HDTV operations, which drove a massive wave of technology spending that lasted more than a decade.

Although episodic and documentary content has or will soon move to 4K/UHD acquisition and archive (because it extends the useful life of content assets), it will take time for 4K/UHD to move into mainstream live production environments such as news and sports.  One reason for this is that it is still complex and expensive to create an entire live event in 4K/UHD, compared to today’s HD broadcast.  Uncompressed 4K/UHD requires real-time processing at 12 Gbps, and the full production chain is not yet widely available.  Another critical issue is that most 4K/UHD capable cameras utilize large format single sensors and cine-style PL-mount lenses. While the shallow depth-of-field produced by these acquisition systems is a perfect match for theatrical or drama production, it causes problems in live sports production, where depth-of-field is important to keep critical action sequences in constant focus.

Nevertheless, there’s no doubt that 4K/UHD is driving strong interest and excitement in the industry.  However, it remains to be seen whether it will become a mainstream technology driver as HD has been, or whether it will go the way of 3D production, which caused huge excitement in 2010 before being relegated to near-non-existence just a few years later.

Cloud computing / cloud based services,” is the #5 ranked trend (maintaining the same position as in 2013).

It seems that you can’t read anything about technology these days (broadcast or otherwise) without coming across some mention of “the cloud.”  So why is something that is apparently so important to so many people not ranked higher?

For the past several years, it was apparent that there was not a clear understanding of how cloud technology would be deployed in the broadcast environment, and what benefits it would bring.  This is still the case in many quarters in 2014, but this year our research shows that while there continues to be skepticism about the cloud (not to mention security concerns), the acceptance of (or at least the willingness to consider) cloud technology and services increased rapidly in 2014.

Indeed the Devoncroft 2014 BBS Global Market Report shows that Cloud Services / Cloud Technology is one of the fastest growing areas of project spending in the broadcast industry in 2014. This (paid) report also includes information about what technologies end-users are planning to deploy in the cloud, when they are planning to deploy them, and what efficiencies they hope to achieve by doing so.

For example, data from the Devoncroft 2014 BBS Global Market Report shows that Cloud Services / Cloud Technology has become one of the fastest growing areas of project spending in the broadcast industry this year.

Significantly more information about the attitudes of broadcast technology buyers towards cloud technology, and what broadcast technology buyers are likely to actually deploy in the cloud is available from Devoncroft Partners.

The #6 ranked trend in the 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index is the “Transition to HDTV Operations.

The transition to HDTV has been a huge driver of broadcast technology spending for more than a decade, but 2014 BBS respondents report that it is declining in terms of future commercial importance to their organizations.  In 2014, the technology required for the transition to HDTV is well understood by the majority of the market, even those who have not yet made the transition.

Despite its gradual decline in the 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index rankings, we believe that the HD transition will continue to be one of the most important industry drivers over the coming years. There are a number of reasons for this, but the most important is that there is still a long way to go in the HD transition on a global basis. Indeed, our research shows that 2014 is the first year that the total penetration of HDTV infrastructure has surpassed the 50% market for the global market.

Nevertheless, with the transition to HD having been a critically important driver for so many years, it begs the question of what’s next — as broadcast technology end-users in developed markets approach the completion of their HD transition, where does their focus (and spending) shift?

A review of the 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index seems to indicate the answer lies in products and services that facilitate increased operational efficiency, and new revenue streams.

“Improvements in compression efficiency,” which is ranked #7 in the 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index is consistent with the desire for increased efficiency. With content distribution models having migrated from single linear broadcast channels, to multi-channel Pay TV playout, to a totally on-demand environment, high quality compression is a critical success factor for broadcasters and content playout platforms.

A plethora of new channels, and the desire for simultaneous bandwidth saving and increased image quality for MPCD services have driven an increasing focus on high quality compression systems. For the past several years this has resulted in better MPEG-2 and H.264 compression products for primary distribution, contribution, and redistribution to consumers. H.265, aka HEVC compression technology holds the promise of further reducing the bandwidth required to deliver high quality images, particularly for 4K/UHD channels.  However, it’s still early days for HEVC, and widespread deployments are still a year or two away.  Nevertheless, it’s clear that for many end-users of broadcast technology, HEVC could be a game-changer.

In addition to creating greater efficiencies, end-users are also looking for ways to increase their revenue in an environment where the economic model of the industry is changing dramatically.  Thus “video-on-demand,” which is ranked #8 in the 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, will continue to be a strong driver for content owners, media companies and broadcasters.  The combination of MPCD, better compression technology, and an ever-increasing channel count, will continue to push video on demand deployment, whether via traditional broadcast and pay TV platforms, or over the internet or mobile networks.

The “move to automated workflows” is ranked #9 in the 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

Better compression technology and lower cost integrated playout platforms (aka “channel-in-a-box”), will facilitate an ongoing proliferation of new TV channels.  This will in turn drive a focus on bringing highly automated operations to channel playout and master control environments. Thus we expect to continue to see a strong interest in the “move to automated workflows” over the next several years.  Automated workflows are also seen as drivers of efficiency.

While efficiency is undoubtedly very important to end-users, actually making money through the monetization of the new automated channels that are coming on-line has driven a significant increase in focus on content monetization via “targeted advertising,” which is ranked #10 in the 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index.

“Remote production,” which is ranked #11 in 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index is another trend that is all about efficiency.  Through the use of remote production, broadcasters can lower their costs of producing live events, whether they are as small as a local soccer match or as large as the World Cup.

Similarly, broadcasters and media companies can achieve enormous cost-savings through the trend ranked #12 in the 2014 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index, “centralizing operations,” including playout and transmission

Although it’s towards the bottom of the rankings at #13, “analog switch-off” is very important for those regions where it’s happening today – primarily as mandated by local governments.  Our research shows that analog switch-off (also called “digital switch-over” in some territories) has driven huge waves of CapEx in those markets where it has already occurred.

As with previous years, the following trends were ranked towards the low-end of the Index: “transition to 3Gbps operations”, “transition to 5.1 channel audio”, “outsourced operations”, “3D TV” and “green initiatives.

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The information in this article is based on select findings from the 2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of broadcast industry trends, technology purchasing plans, and benchmarking of broadcast technology vendor brands. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries took part in the 2014 BBS, making it the largest and most comprehensive market study ever conducted in the broadcast industry. The BBS is published annually by Devoncroft Partners.

Granular analysis of these results is available as part of various paid-for reports based on the 2014 BBS data set. For more information about this report, please contact Devoncroft Partners

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Related Content

2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) Reports Now Available

2014 Broadcast Industry Market Research from Devoncroft Partners

Devoncroft Research: IBC 2014: Observations and Analysis of Broadcast and Media Technology Industry (free 52 page report, registration required)

The 2013 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2012 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2011 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2010 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

The 2009 BBS Broadcast Industry Global Trend Index

 

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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Download New Devoncroft Partners Report: IBC 2014 – Observations and Analysis of the Media Technology Industry

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast technology vendor financials, Broadcast Vendor M&A, market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Sep 09 2014

In advance of the upcoming IBC trade show in Amsterdam, Devoncroft Partners has published an analysis of the trends and strategic drivers in the broadcast and media technology sector.

A link to download this report can be found at the bottom of this page.

 

Devoncroft Partners – IBC 2014 – Observations and Analysis of Media Technology Industry (image)

 

The report covers and provides commentary on a variety of significant market trends, drivers, and events, including:

 

  • Review of recent significant industry developments, and thoughts on future trends

 

  • Financial performance of selected industry vendors

 

  • Business and technical observations from vendors end-users

 

  • Ongoing consolidation of end-users and vendors

 

  • Recent private placements, investments, and IPOs

 

  • The disruption of the TV business…. Still waiting

 

  • Selected vendor announcements

 

  • Broadcast industry trends

 

  • Where money is being spent in the broadcast industry

 

  • The “trend-spend disconnect”

 

  • Transition to IP – analysis of strategic drivers

 

  • Review of technology opportunities

 

  • Thoughts on the next big thing

 

 

Included in the analysis are excerpts from the 2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), the largest and most comprehensive study of  technology trends, buyer behavior, and vendor brands in the broadcast and media technology sector.

We welcome feedback, comments, and questions on this report

If you would like to schedule a meeting at the IBC show, please let us know as soon as possible.  We are in the process of finalizing the IBC schedule for the Devoncroft team, and have very limited availability remaining.

We hope to see you in Amsterdam.

 

Please click here to download a PDF copy (5 MB) copy of Devoncroft’s IBC 2014 – Observations and Analysis of the Media Technology Industry (registration required).

 

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Related Content:

Devoncroft Partners: IBC 2014 – Observations and Analysis of Media Technology Industry (registration required)

2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) Reports Now Available

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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Vislink Broadcast Revenue Declines 10 Percent in 1H 2014, Expects Improved Second Half

broadcast technology market research, Broadcast technology vendor financials, Broadcast Vendor M&A, Quarterly Results | Posted by Joe Zaller
Sep 08 2014

UK-based Vislink plc, which owns broadcast industry brands Advent, Link, MRC Gigawave, and Pebble Beach, announced that its total revenue from continuing operations for the first six months of 2014 was £27.1m, down 3.2% versus the same period a year ago.

Pre-tax profit for 1H 2014 was £2m, up from a net profit of £1.4m during the same period a year ago.

 

Broadcast Performance:

The company’s broadcast industry revenue for the first half of 2014 was £21.1m, down 10.2% versus the first six months of 2013. Vislink attributed the lower year-on-year broadcast revenue to market uncertainty and longer decision making cycles.

Broadcast orders during 1H 2014 were £21.5m, down 22.9% versus the first six months of 2013.

The table below shows a complete breakdown of Vislink’s broadcast revenue by geographic region.

 

Vislink - Broadcast Revenus 1H 2014

 

Vislink’s 1H 2014 broadcast revenue includes a contribution from Pebble Beach Systems, which was acquired by Vislink in March 2014 for $24.7m.

In the 3.5 months since it was acquired, Pebble Beach contributed £3.1m, and generated an adjusted operating profit of £1.1m.  The company said that Pebble Beach “is developing very quickly and continues to trade ahead of our expectations at the time of acquisition.”

Following on from the success of the Pebble Beach deal, Vislink telegraphed to the market its intent to make more acquisitions in the future, saying its move to the AIM stock market “has simplified and reduced the financial burden of making acquisitions, giving us continued benefits for bolt-on acquisitions.”

“Whilst the broadcast market has been challenging for our hardware business, overall, we are encouraged with these results,” said Vislink Chairman John Hawkins. “We have taken timely action to reduce costs in our Hardware Division and we have seen an improved trading trend, the order book strengthened in Q2 and the orders to sales ratio is better than 1.

“We are delivering on our software strategy with Pebble Beach Systems performing ahead of expectations. The Group’s revenue has benefitted from the change in revenue balance, with software providing longer term visibility. The partnership with Harmonic Inc, which is being announced later today, represents further excellent opportunities for the Group.”

The company ended 1H 2014 with £7.7m of cash. There was a net cash inflow from operating activities in the period of £5.5m, up significantly from £1.6m for the first half of 2013.

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Harmonic Acquires 3.6 Percent of Vislink, Signs £2 Million OEM Deal

Separately, Vislink announced that Harmonic has acquired 3.6% of the company, through the purchase of 4 million new ordinary shared valued at £0.50 each. Vislink says it will use the investment from Harmonic to further strengthen its balance sheet.

In parallel with the investment, Harmonic has also signed £2m OEM contract with Vislink, through which Harmonic sell playout solutions from Pebble Beach Systems to broadcast industry customers. Vislink acquired Pebble Beach in March 2014 for $24.7m.

Under the terms of the OEM deal, Harmonic will place an initial order for software licenses of £2.0m, receivable in 2014, to secure Pebble Beach Systems’ products for onward sale in its integrated package.

Vislink says the deal with Harmonic “should contribute to improved profitability and penetration of Pebble Beach Systems software globally in the second half [of 2014].”

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Outlook:

Vislink said it has “an improved outlook for the broadcast market,” and anticipates improved trading in the second half of 2014.

For the past several years, Vislink has told the market its goal is to increase its revenue to £80 million, with 10% return on sales.

However, in its latest earnings announcement, the company has changed this position slightly, saying “As the proportion of our business coming from higher margin software becomes more significant, the target revenue needed to generate our long stated operating profit target will change. The Company remains committed to its target operating profit of £8.0m through both organic growth and bolt-on acquisitions.”

“2014 represents a transitional and transformational year for the Group and with the increasing focus on our software division, we believe that this will enhance the Group’s overall quality of earnings in 2014 and beyond,” said Hawkins.

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Related Content:

Press Release: Vislink plc half year results for the six months ended 30 June 2014

Harmonic Invests in Vislink, Signs £2 Million OEM Order for Pebble Beach Software

Broadcast Vendor M&A: Vislink Buys Pebble Beach for $24.7 Million

 

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© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS) Reports Now Available

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, market research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 15 2014

After months of data collection, analysis, and visualization, we have now completed work on the 2014 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS). Reports from this study have now been published and are available from Devoncroft Partners.

If you’re not familiar with the BBS, it’s the most comprehensive annual study of technology end-users in the global broadcast industry. Nearly 10,000 broadcast professionals in 100+ countries participated in the 2014 BBS, making it once again the largest market study of the broadcast industry.

BBS reports have been designed to help readers improve their strategic decision-making, customer engagement, marketing strategy, product planning, and sales execution.  BBS reports are also used frequently for M&A-related activities by both buyers and sellers.

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Three types of 2014 BBS reports are available:

  • 2014 BBS Global Brand Reports:  provides deep insight into how each more than 100 broadcast technology suppliers (see full list below) are perceived by market participants, along with comprehensive benchmarking of broadcast technology vendors on a wide variety of metrics.

 

  • 2014 BBS Product Reports:  provide detailed information from buyers, specifiers, and users of broadcast technology products in 31 separate categories (see full list below)

 

  • 2014 BBS Global Market Report: provides detailed information about industry trends, major projects being planned, products being evaluated for purchase, current and future plant infrastructure, broadcast technology CapEx budgets, and planned deployment of new technologies including 4K, Connected TV, and Social TV.

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If you would like information about these reports and how they can help your business, please get in touch.

 

In addition to these paid-for reports, we will also be publishing highlights from the 2014 BBS on the Devoncroft website.  These articles will be posted on a semi-regular basis, so please check back often.

To receive posts when they are published, just enter your email in the box in the upper right-hand corner of the page.

 

The tables below show the product categories and broadcast technology vendor brands covered in the 2014 BBS.

 

 Product Categories Covered in the 2014 BBS:

2014 BBS -- Product Categories Covered in the 2014 Big Broadcast Survey

 

 

Broadcast Technology Brands Covered in the 2014 BBS:

 

2014 BBS -- All Brands included in 2014 BBS

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.© Devoncroft Partners 2009 – 2014. All Rights Reserved.

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