Archive for the ‘Broadcast technology channel strategy’ Category

As Rumored, Blackmagic Announces Purchase of Echolab Assets

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 12 2010

As predicted here last month, Blackmagic Designs announced today that it has acquired “all the assets of Echolab,” putting Blackmagic in the production switcher business.

Echolab was forced into liquidation a few months ago when its primary shareholder stopped funding its operations.  The company had been in business for more than 35 years, specializing in low-end production switchers.

Blackmagic is buying Echolab for the latter’s ATEM product line, which was introduced about two years ago and has been continuously upgraded since under Echolab’s former CEO Nigel Spratling, who apparently not part of the Blackmagic deal and has now joined Ross Video in a marketing role.

This is great news for the affected Echolab employees, who were left jobless in an instant when the company shut its doors in mid-May.  It’s also good news for the industry, because the ATEM switcher product line, which looks like a pretty good product, will continue to be available through Blackmagic.  In fact, Blackmagic has said that it is adding to the engineering team responsible for ATEM.

It will be interesting to see how Blackmagic approaches the production switcher market, which is different than the company’s core post production market.  The part of the production switcher market where Echolab is active has considerable competition. In addition to Echolab, Sony, Panasonic, JVC, For-A and Ross Video are all very active players in this space.   

In addition to the competitive aspects of the deal, it seems to me that selling production switchers is a bit of a departure business-wise for Blackmagic.  Production switchers are a “high-touch” product category.  They are mission critical elements of the live production workflow, and as such they can require extensive demonstrations and training.  The majority of Blackmagic’s products are plug-in cards or stand-alone units, which are sold primarily through third-party dealers.  

At this point, I am unsure whether Blackmagic’s all-dealer sales approach is a positive or a negative for Echolab.  On the plus side, the compact HD production switcher market is a large and somewhat amorphous, running the gamut from broadcasters to corporation, to churches to education —  so it requires a large dealer network, which Blackmagic already has in place.  On the other hand production switchers require a specialized sales approach. Every buyer wants a demonstration, which typically involves shipping equipment and people, thereby increasing the cost of each sale.  Blackmagic will probably have to augment their approach somewhat in order to be successful selling production switchers.

Still if they can get the distribution right, Blackmagic may have a good chance of making their purchase of Echolab a success.  Blackmagic most likely paid very little for Echolab’s assets, and since it’s buying the assets and not the company, it gets a brand new HD switcher line, but not 35 years of legacy products that need support.  And Blackmagic does have experience buying distressed “traditional” vendors and changing their approach.  Last year, Blackmagic acquired leading color grading vendor Da Vinci Systems, and proceeded to radically change Da Vinci’s market approach, not to mention its pricing, turning a $200,000 hardware product into a sub-$1000 product according to TVB Europe.

Arguably however, Da Vinci’s color grading products (which are used off-line in post production) were easier to port to software platforms – and they still require a very expensive hardware controller.  Live production switchers are a different kettle of fish than off-line color grading systems for post production.  They are the key element of any live broadcast production, and they are still a relatively expensive hardware platform that requires specialist sales and support.

Blackmagic CEO Grant Petty is obviously familiar with this.  In the company’s press release that announced the deal he said: “I have been using live production switchers since I was in school where we covered local theater, sports, racing and bands. I think it’s the most exciting way to do production because it’s all live and thousands of people are watching what you are doing! Production switchers need to be powerful while also being familiar and easy to operate.”

Petty also said that “Since the acquisition, we have already dramatically expanded the engineering team working on ATEM. This fresh engineering team, which is a combination of new as well as experienced EchoLab staff, will allow us to move faster in adding new features to the ATEM product.”

Blackmagic will be displaying the ATEM on its booth at the IBC show next month. 

Here is a link to the full press release announcing the deal.

When it Comes to Purchasing Broadcast Technology, Who are the Most Important Decision Makers Today? Who Will it be in the Future?

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 11 2010

I recently wrote an article called Broadcast Industry’s Largest Market Study Reveals Most Important Technology Trends, which shows that the move towards “file-based / tapeless workflows” is one of the most important issues to broadcasters today.

But how will this shift affect how broadcast technology products are purchased, not to mention who buys them?  Traditionally these products have been purchased primarily by engineers.  Will this be the same for products that are increasingly IT-based, or will there be a new set of buyers?

Broadcast vendors need to know this because a new set of buyers may require a new market approach.

To find out we asked the nearly 800 broadcast technology vendors who responded to the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey who they feel is currently the most important decision maker in the sales process, and who they feel will be most important in 2-3 years.

 

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The Most Important Decision Makers Today

Let’s start with the most important buyers today. Respondents were asked “when selling your products / services, which category of customer is typically the most important decision maker today”

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Today, broadcast tech vendors see engineering staff as their most important customers, followed by operations, IT, and finance personnel.  Engineers are clearly seen as the most important decision makers, with operations staff a distant second.

These results are fairly consistent with vendors of all types, but as the table below shows, a look at these results in detail does highlight some variation.

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Vendor respondents based in Americas, along with those who primarily sell hardware products, currently see engineering staff as the most important technology purchasing decision makers.

Large vendors, and those that primarily sell software products, see engineers as marginally less important.  But even so most of these vendors still see engineers as their top customers today.

 

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The Most Important Decision Maker in the Future

When these same respondents were asked who they feel will be the most important decision makers in 2-3 years time, the results were different.  As the following table illustrates, broadcast technology vendors are anticipating a shift in the type of decagons maker they will be targeting in the future.

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In a fairly dramatic shift, operations staff are predicted to become the most important decision makers in the broadcast technology buying process, eclipsing engineers.  In these results, engineers fall from 48% to 31%, while operations increases from 28% to 33%.

Engineers will still be a very important part of the buying process, but vendors are predicting that the power of the engineer as decision maker will be diminished in favor of not only operations, but also IT and finance personnel.

These results are once again fairly consistent across all types of vendors, but there are some variations when one looks at the detail.

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Once again, those vendor respondents based in the Americas along with those who sell primarily hardware products, continue to view engineers as the most important decision makers in the future, albeit it at a reduced percentage versus today.

Respondents from EMEA along with those who primarily sell software, or a hardware/software mix, see engineers as much less important in the future.  Instead, these respondents view operations and IT personnel as their most important targets.

Respondents from Asia-Pacific see operations personnel as the most important decision makers, in contrast to those from the Americas where engineers are still seen as the top target.  Indeed 42% of respondents from the Asia-Pacific region see operations staff as the most important decision maker in the future (up from 31% today), while just 21% of respondents from the Americas see operations staff as most important. 

These findings are consistent with the industry trends that are most important to broadcast technology buyers, which I mentioned earlier.  As technology buyers complete their HD build-outs, their commercial focus is shifting towards achieving operational efficiencies and generating new revenue streams.  Thus operations, IT, and finance personnel will become an increasingly important part of the decision making process at broadcast technology buyers.

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This article is based on the findings from the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of industry trends, technology purchasing behavior and the opinion of vendor brands.  With more than 5,600 people in 120+ countries participating, the 2010 version of the BBS is the largest and most comprehensive market study ever done in the broadcast industry.

Broadcast Tech Vendors Sell Direct Today, Increasingly Indirect Tomorrow

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Aug 02 2010

Although the broadcast industry is global, many industry vendors are relatively small.  So for many technology providers, reaching a world-wide customer base can be a significant challenge.  

Vendors have a variety of go-to-market options, including direct sales, a network of dealers & reps, and of course systems integrators.  There is no one-size-fits-all approach to selling successfully, so all vendors use some kind of mix of the available options.  

To better understand how broadcast technology vendors are selling today and what how they are thinking about their future distribution strategies, we asked the nearly 800 broadcast technology vendors who responded to the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey about their current and future sales channels.  Here’s what we found:

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Current Vendor Sales Mix

Vendors were first asked what percent of their sales goes through each of the go-to-market alternatives.

  

Question: How do you currently sell?

In general, broadcast technology vendors show a strong preference to sell direct where possible.  Just under half of vendor respondents indicated that they sell more than 50% of their products on a direct basis.  Yet a large number of vendors responded that they sell their products on an indirect basis through both dealers and systems integrators.

  

 

Future Vendor Sales Mix

As a follow-on question, vendors were asked how they see this sales mix changing in the future.  The results are presented in the chart below.

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Question: How do you expect your sales mix to change in the future?

Although direct sales will undoubtedly continue to be important, vendors predict that direct sales will increasingly decline in favor of indirect channels. 29% of vendors predict that their direct sales will increase by more than 10%, but at the same time 6% expect their direct sales to decrease by 1-10% and 3% expect them to decrease by more than 10%

Systems integrators are seen to be increasingly important, with 32% of vendors anticipating that their sales through SIs will increase by more than 10% over the next several years.

Keep in mind that these results are presented at a high level and that they represent the opinions of all vendor respondents.  Findings may vary based on the type of vendor (e.g. hardware or software), geographic location, product categories produced etc.  If you’d like a granular breakdown of these results, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

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This article is based on the findings from the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of industry trends, technology purchasing behavior and the opinion of vendor brands.  With more than 5,600 people in 120+ countries participating, the 2010 version of the BBS is the largest and most comprehensive market study ever done in the broadcast industry.

Strategic Planning and Business Development Top Broadcast Technology Vendor Improvement Wish List

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Jul 19 2010

As part of the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey, just under 800 broadcast technology hardware and software vendors were asked what they would most like to improve about their organizations.

Respondents were presented with the following list of nine issues and asked to rank which ones they would most like to change about their business. 

  • Strategic planning / vision
  • Relationship with customers
  • Business development (partnerships)
  • Engineering
  • Marketing
  • Relationship with channel partners
  • Internal communications
  • Product management
  • Sales

 

 The results are summarized in the chart below, which also provides interesting insight into the difference in attitudes and business approach of vendors of different sizes types and businesses.

Question: What would you most like to change in your organization?

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This table shows the difference in response based on size of organization, percentage of revenue derived from the broadcast industry, geographic region, company ownership structure, product mix, and finally by the role of the respondent.

Across all vendors, 42% of respondents want to change some aspect of their sales and marketing organization (sales, marketing, or business development).  An additional 13% cast their vote to change strategic planning / vision.  For all respondents, business development is ranked as the top area that vendors would most like to change about their organizations, followed by sales and strategic planning / vision, which are tied for second place.

When these results are viewed by organization size, the rankings marketing-related issues decrease as the organization size increases, so it appears that the marketing functions of larger vendors are better regarded internally than those of smaller companies.

However, as organizational size increases, different issues appear to become more problematic within broadcast technology vendors.  The top issues for improvement cited by employees of large vendors include product management, relationships with customers, and strategic planning / vision.  In large organizations, the top-ranked issue for improvement is strategic planning / vision.

From a geographic point of view, results are fairly consistent, however the top factor is different in each region.  In the Americas, the top issue is strategic planning / vision, in EMEA the top issue is business development, and in Asia the top issue is sales.  Please note that these results are based on the location of the respondent rather than the headquarters of the company in question.

Finally, there is a contrast between the small and large vendors.  Small companies are focused on improving sales and partnerships (business development) above all other issues.  Every sale is critical to small firms, and many must work through third parties such as partners and channel partners.  Larger, more established companies are less concerned with sales than with strategic vision, customer relationships, and product management.

If you work for a broadcast technology vendor, do these findings resonate with you?  Either way, let me know.  I’d interested to hear your perspective on this issue.

Recent Findings from the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast Vendor Brand Research, Top Broadcast Vendor Brands | Posted by Joe Zaller
May 26 2010

Recent Market Research Findings from the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey

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The Top 30 Broadcast Technology Vendor Brands, Ranked by “Overall Opinion,” Globally and Regionally

An overview of how broadcast technology vendor brands were ranked for “overall opinion” in the 2010 BBS. Results are shown globally and regionally

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What factors most influence the purchase of broadcast technology products?

Regardless of how broadcast technology products are purchased, what many in the industry want to know is why they are bought, i.e., what is the most important factors that influence the decision to buy one product over another.

When it comes to selling broadcast technology, there are several strategies that vendors have adopted. This includes positioning their offerings as having the best technology, the best feature set, the lowest cost, the best value, the best service, the most recommended, etc. But which factor is the most important to the most buyers?

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Purchasing Preferences of Broadcast Technology Buyers – “Best-of-Breed” or “One-Stop-Shop?

How do buyers of broadcast technology products prefer to purchase: using a best-of-breed approach (evaluating products from multiple vendors) or a one-stop shop where one vendor provides a complete solution?

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How are broadcast technology products typically purchased — direct from vendors, through an SI or a dealer?

This article examines the way broadcast technology products are purchased, i.e., what purchasing channels are typically used by buyers of broadcast technology products.

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NAB 2010: NAB: Stations Focus On Web, Mobile, HDTV (TVNewsCheck Interview)

In this interview conducted by Harry Jessell of TV News Check, Joe Zaller discusses the major trends that are impacting US broadcasters, including the transition to HDTV, multi-platform content delivery and 3D.

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What Broadcast Buyers Are Evaluating for Purchase in 2010

This article focuses on the products that are being evaluated for purchase this year by broadcast professionals.  We presented technology buyers with a list of relevant product categories, and asked them to indicate which product type they are currently evaluating for purchase.

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Where is Money Being Spent in the Broadcast Industry? — A Review of Major Projects Being Planned

In the current environment, everyone in the broadcast business wants to know which parts of the industry are doing well, where money is being spent and what is driving this spending.

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Broadcast Industry’s Largest Market Study Reveals Most Important Technology Trends

This article looks at how respondents ranked a variety of technology trends in terms of importance to their business. This article presents the answers to this question in two ways: as a global trends index and by the percentage of respondents who indicated the importance of each trend to their business.

What factors most influence the purchase of broadcast technology products?

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
May 17 2010

This is the third in a series of posts about how broadcast technology products are purchased.

Previously I have looked the purchasing channels typically used by different types of broadcast technology buyers, as well as whether these buyers prefer a best of breed or one-stop-shop approach when sourcing broadcast technology products.  The information in these posts reveals that there is considerable variation in the way different types of buyers purchase broadcast technology products.

Regardless of “how” broadcast technology products are purchased, what many in the industry want to know is “why” they are bought — i.e. what are the most important factors that influence the decision to buy one product over another.

When it comes to selling broadcast technology, there are several strategies that vendors have adopted.  This includes positioning their offerings as having the best technology, the best feature set, the lowest cost, the best value, the best service, the most recommended etc.

But which factor is the most important to the most buyers?

To find out we asked several thousand broadcast professionals around the world what is most important to them when buying broadcast technology products.  The results are shown in the chart below.

Question: When purchasing / evaluating broadcast technology products, which of the following are the most important factor?

These results show that in a highly technical business like the broadcast industry, when it comes to purchasing broadcast hardware and software products, technical specification and technical performance is the most important factor for the majority of today’s buyers.

In fact, technical performance in the broadcast industry is so critical, that at least three times more respondents cited technical performance / specification than the next most important factor.  It looks like in this case “the only race is for second place.” 

Having said that, other factors such as operational features, service and support, total cost of ownership, and purchase price are also seen as very important criteria for product purchase. 

The challenge for vendors is to deliver sufficient technical performance that is “fit-for-purpose” for the customer’s application and then work to differentiate their offering through the factors that are seen as most important to each type of customer.

They key to this is understanding how these results can vary when broken out by demographic factors such as organization type, company size, job title, and kind of product that is being evaluated for purchase.  Indeed a granular breakdown of this information shows that there may be considerable variation in purchase criteria based on a number of these factors.

If you would like more information, please contact Devoncroft Partners.

This article is based on the findings from the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of industry trends, technology purchasing behavior and the opinion of vendor brands.  With more than 5,600 people in 120+ countries participating, the 2010 version of the BBS is the largest and most comprehensive market study ever done in the broadcast industry.

Purchasing Preferences of Broadcast Technology Buyers – “Best-of-Breed” or “One-Stop-Shop?

broadcast industry technology trends, broadcast industry trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
May 11 2010

In previous post, I looked at the purchasing channels that are typically used by different types of buyers when broadcast technology products.   This reveled that there is considerable variation in the way broadcast technology products are purchased.

Today I am going to look at how buyers of broadcast technology products prefer to purchase – a “best-of-breed” approach (evaluating products from multiple vendors) or a “one-stop-shop” where one vendor provides a complete solution.  

There are a huge number of vendors in the broadcast technology space, and the industry’s vendor community is fragmented.  Major international trade exhibitions such as NAB and IBC often have between 1,000 and 1,500 exhibitors at their shows.

On the one hand are the many vendors who are relatively small and specialize in one or two product types.  There are also a small number of large international vendors who produce dozens of product types.

There are obvious advantages that come with the scale that large companies have achieved, but small companies often argue that their more nimble, focused approach results in superior products.

This has led to an ongoing debate within the broadcast industry about whether it’s better to buy so called “best-of-breed” solutions from a variety of suppliers, or go to one large company and buy everything from a single vendor.

There are pros and cons to each approach.  Dealing with a number of companies may indeed enable buyers to assemble a “best-of-breed” system, but this approach brings the possibility of interoperability issues and potential finger-pointing between vendors if things go wrong.  Dealing with a large “one-stop-shop” gives buyers the peace of mind that interoperability issues have been solved, that there is one phone number to call if things go wrong, and that there will be no finger pointing.

To find out what the market thinks about this issue, respondents to the 2010 BBS were asked the following question:

When purchasing broadcast technology products, do you prefer to buy from a single “one-stop-shop” or select “best-of-breed” solutions from multiple vendors?

 

In an era when vendor consolidation is on the rise, it’s interesting to note that where possible, the majority of traditional broadcast technology buyers prefer to evaluate and purchase so called “best-of-breed” solutions from multiple vendors.

Broadcasters, as well as cable programmers, playout, and centers cable / satellite / IPTV operators showed the strongest preference to select best-of-breed solutions. These customers typically have large-scale operations requiring large amounts of technology products.  They also tend to have significant technical resources to evaluate and select best-of-breed solutions.

Conversely, film studios, government and educational buyers exhibited the strongest preference to purchase from a single supplier.  This reflects the fact that there are several strong dealers who cater specifically to the Hollywood studios; and it’s likely that government & educational buyers may consider local dealers and systems integrators to be single suppliers.

Once again, these results show that there is considerable variation in the broadcast technology purchasing process, based on customer category.  They also highlight the importance to vendors of developing go-to-market strategies that encompass direct sales, while at the same time developing and maintaining strong relationships with third-party players in the distribution channel.

This article is based on the findings from the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of industry trends, technology purchasing behavior and the opinion of vendor brands.  With more than 5,600 people in 120+ countries participating, the 2010 version of the BBS is the largest and most comprehensive market study ever done in the broadcast industry.

Devoncroft Digest — Week Ending April 30, 2010 — Good new outnumbers bad news for the week

broadcast industry technology trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research, Broadcast technology vendor financials | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 30 2010

Devoncroft Digest – Week Ending April 30, 2010

 

Is the market picking up?  Good new outnumbers bad news for the week.

TVB reported that broadcasters have resumed their HD newsroom upgrades.  The article lists multiple stations that have moved ahead with the transition to HD news.  This is welcome news for broadcast vendors, and further reinforces my post-NAB thoughts that the market is picking up.

TVB also reported that, according to BIA/Kelsey, US broadcast station income will increase by 7.5% this year versus 2009.

Further signs of the market is improving were see this week with the four big US broadcast networks seeing a healthy increase in upfront ad sales.  According to Media Post (via TVNewsCheck) Barclays Capital estimated a 20% jump in the upfront market, giving the Big Four broadcasters a combined $8.26 billion.

 

 Earnings Season Continues

 Earnings season is in full swing this week, with Arris, Belden, DivX, Dolby, Discovery and Harris reporting their results.

For the most part, the results were positive, indicating that the market has picked up:

  • Belden announced strong results for their first quarter of 2010.

 

 

 

  • Discovery Communications also posted strong earnings, beating analyst expectations.  Both revenue and profits increased, with an especially strong showing in the international market

 

However, not all results were positive:

  • Arris reported a revenue increase of 5% versus the same period a year ago, but its net income declined 11% versus the previous quarter.  The stock was downgraded by several banks.

 

  • The Broadcast Communications Division of Harris posted a $5m loss for the quarter and took a $1m restructuring charge.  The company lowered guidance for the broadcast division for the full year and announced that it would be taking a further $6m restructuring charge in the current quarter in order to achieve further cost reduction.

 

Other interesting things this week:

According to the Wall Street Journal, RED Cameras has paid almost $20m for a house in Beverly Hills, CA that will be used for guests of the company.  How do I get invited to that house warming party?

Google is reportedly working on Android-based software to enable set-top boxes, TVs and other devices to more content from the Internet.  According to the Wall Street Journal Google’s move has attracted interest from partners that include Sony Corp., Intel Corp. and Logitech International SA, which are expected to offer products that support the software, these people said. None have so far discussed the efforts publicly.

 

 

Market Research Note of the Week:

How are broadcast technology products typically purchased – Direct from vendor, SI or dealer?

As part of the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey I asked several thousand technology buyers (including broadcasters, playout centers, cable/satellite/IPTV operators, education, film studios etc) in 120+ countries how they typically buy broadcast technology products – direct from a vendor; through a systems integrator; through a dealer; or some other way.

It turns out that there is considerable variation in the way broadcast technology products are purchased, with each category of buyer exhibiting different purchasing preferences. 

These results help readers to better understand the channel structure in the broadcast market.  They are interesting because they highlight that there are some times when it makes more sense for vendors to use a channel than go direct.  They also show that there are some types of buyers who are more used to buying through the channel versus direct.

To see the results, including a chart that breaks responses down by company type, please click here.

How are broadcast technology products typically purchased — direct from vendors, through an SI or a dealer?

broadcast industry technology trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 28 2010

This article is based on the findings from the 2010 Big Broadcast Survey (BBS), a global study of industry trends, technology purchasing behavior and the opinion of vendor brands.  With more than 5,600 people in 120+ countries participating, the 2010 version of the BBS is the largest and most comprehensive market study ever done in the broadcast industry.

I have previously discussed marco findings from my market research such as the most important technology trends in the broadcast industry, where money is being spent in the broadcast industry, and what broadcast technology products are currently being evaluated for purchase.

Today I am going to look at the way broadcast technology products are purchased – i.e. what purchasing channels are typically used by buyers of broadcast technology products.   

Survey respondents were asked how they typically buy broadcast technology products – direct from a vendor; through a systems integrator; through a dealer; or some other way. 

To show the variation in response, the results in the chart below are broken out by organization type.

Question: How do you typically purchase broadcast technology products?

Breaking out the answers to this question by organization type shows that there is considerable variation in the way broadcast technology products are purchased, with each type of broadcast technology buyer exhibiting different purchasing preferences.  These results are interesting because they highlight that there are some times when it makes more sense for vendors to use a channel than go direct.  They also show that there are some types of buyers who are more used to buying through the channel versus direct.

For example, cable/satellite/IPTV operators showed a strong preference to purchase directly from vendors (perhaps because of the relatively small number of these platforms as well as the large amount of equipment they require).

Respondents from educational institutions, film studios, post- production, and recording studios reported that they tend to purchase broadcast technology products via third-party dealers. 

Systems integrators (SIs) sit between the vendor and the dealer in terms of the percentage of customers who prefer to buy through them, but keep in mind that these rankings show only the number of customers who prefer to buy in a certain way.  They do not look at the value of the purchase that goes through any individual channel. 

SIs play a strong role across all customer types, but particularly with playout centers, cable programmers, and broadcasters.  It’s worth noting the customer types who show the strongest preference for systems integrators tend to the ones with the largest and most complex projects.

Compact HD Production Switcher Market Heats Up

broadcast industry technology trends, Broadcast technology channel strategy, broadcast technology market research | Posted by Joe Zaller
Apr 05 2010

There is a lot of activity these days in the in the compact broadcast production switcher market.

Harris and Echolab announced today that Harris will exclusively resell Echolab’s Atem compact production swithcer.  As part of the deal, Echolab’s Atem will be demonstrated on Harris’ NAB booth, integrated with Harris graphics products.

With the Harris-Echolab deal, there is a lot of activity in this part of the market:

 

Clearly this is a market that everyone wants to get in on.

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